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Aviatrix  
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Aviatrix Replybullet Posted: 10 May 2007 at 6:33pm
That it doesn't make a lot of sense to refer to our Almighty Creator as "god" when we can read the names Hhe used for Himself.
 
And also, that it's a similar word in Judaism and Islam (Hebrew/Arabic.) Moreover, the plurality of the word in Hebrew has sometimes been used to denote the Trinity when in actuality that doesn't make any sense.
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wesley  
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote wesley Replybullet Posted: 11 May 2007 at 8:01am

Being more specific about which "god" one is speaking is advantagous.

When the context applies to Jehovah, the Hebrew Elohim is best explained as an intensive plural, denoting greatness and majesty, being equal to The Great God.
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algebra
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote algebra Replybullet Posted: 11 May 2007 at 9:05am
Originally posted by Aviatrix

That it doesn't make a lot of sense to refer to our Almighty Creator as "god" when we can read the names Hhe used for Himself.
 
And also, that it's a similar word in Judaism and Islam (Hebrew/Arabic.) Moreover, the plurality of the word in Hebrew has sometimes been used to denote the Trinity when in actuality that doesn't make any sense.


the name of G_D is the tetragrammaton.

elohim is not a plural of majesty.

no where, and I mean no where have the sages of old suggested that elohim is a plural of majesty. that is simply an attempt of goys to battle over their polytheistic beliefs (to trinity or not to)

i would post the etymology of the word Elohim but it is long

The most commonly accepted root of this source among Jewish scholars is that the word literally translates to "powers" meaning God is the One in control of these powers.

A plural noun governing a singular verb may be according to oldest usage. The gods form a heavenly assembly where they act as one. In this context, the Elohim may be a collective plural when the gods act in concert. Compare this to English headquarters, which is plural but governs a singular verb: there are many rooms or quarters, but they all serve one purpose. Thus, it is argued, the meaning of Elohim therefore can mean one god, with many attributes.


it does not denote many gods or trinity.

There is only on G_D.


We cannot begin to say that Elohim is the name of G_D, anymore than Dios is the name of G_D.

The name of the G_D of the Bible is most clearly the tetragrammaton.

Eloah (and its variants) is used by polytheistic semetic cultures to donate at least one of their gods, like canaanites and arabs.
was allah not one of the names of the statues in polytheistic islamic culture?






Edited by algebra - 11 May 2007 at 9:29am
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thejnk  
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote thejnk Replybullet Posted: 11 May 2007 at 10:22am
Originally posted by Aviatrix

2 Samuel 7:22Wherefore thou art great, Jehovah Elohim; for there is none like thee, neither is there any God beside thee, according to all that we have heard with our ears.

Actually it is Jehovah (YHVH) which is the name of the god. Elohim (ALHYM) is just a word denoting the plural for god.

For example in Exodus 20 when it says "thou salt have no other gods before me", the word for "gods" is also elohim (ALHYM).


You can see for yourself the original text of your quote here:

http://www.mechon-mamre.org/p/pt/pt08b07.htm#22

and that of exodus which refers to other gods as elohim here:


http://www.mechon-mamre.org/p/pt/pt0220.htm#2

The word elohim in hebrew is "אֱלוֹהִים"





Edited by thejnk - 11 May 2007 at 10:24am
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struggle  
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote struggle Replybullet Posted: 11 May 2007 at 4:12pm

Are you saying that the christians call out gods by the hebrew name Elohim?

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wesley  
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote wesley Replybullet Posted: 11 May 2007 at 7:48pm
Originally posted by OneGOD

Are you saying that the christians call out gods by the hebrew name Elohim?

Although not directed to me I'll answer the question. When anyone, Christian or otherwise, reads the Bible they will come to texts that translate the Hebrew Elohim which, according to context, will refer to gods other than Jehovah God.
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thejnk  
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Rating: 1 of 1 votes Quote thejnk Replybullet Posted: 11 May 2007 at 8:07pm
Originally posted by OneGOD

Are you saying that the christians call out gods by the hebrew name Elohim?



All I am saying is that the word elohim is not a name, it is a valid hebrew word meaning gods and it is used in exactly that context elsewhere in the Bible.


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struggle  
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote struggle Replybullet Posted: 11 May 2007 at 8:18pm

thats ridulious, because surely elohim is a name for a particular deity. Elohim is not a word such as "idol" from which it would direct to more than one god. So I think the context was trying to hide that name from what it actually means.  

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thejnk  
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Rating: 1 of 1 votes Quote thejnk Replybullet Posted: 11 May 2007 at 8:52pm
Originally posted by OneGOD

thats ridulious, because surely elohim is a name for a particular deity.

What is ridiculous is insisting on something that is demonstratably false. If you search for the word elohim (ALHYM) in the Bible and see in what context it is used in every instance you will find that it is clearly not the name of a god.



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wesley  
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote wesley Replybullet Posted: 11 May 2007 at 9:15pm
At Psalm 8:5, the angels are referred to as elohim. They are called beneh ha elohim, "sons of God" at Genesis 6:2, 4; Job 1:6; Job 2:1.
 
At Psalm 82:1, 6 elohim is used of men, human judges of Israel
 
Elohim is also used to refer to idol gods at Exodus 12:12; 20:23; 1Samuel 5:7; 1Kings 11:5; Daniel 1:2.
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knight  
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote knight Replybullet Posted: 11 May 2007 at 9:46pm
Hebrew grammar
Elohim has plural morphological form in Hebrew, but it is used with singular verbs and adjectives in the Hebrew text when the particular meaning of the God of Israel (a singular deity) is traditionally understood. Thus the very first words of the Bible are breshit bara Elohim, where bara ברא is a verb inflected as third person singular masculine perfect. If Elohim were an ordinary plural word, then the plural verb form bar'u בראו would have been used in this sentence instead. Such plural grammatical forms are in fact found in cases where Elohim has semantically plural reference (not referring to the God of Israel).

In most English translations of the Bible (e.g. the King James Version), the letter G in "god" is capitalized in cases where Elohim refers to the God of Israel, but there is no distinction between upper and lower case in the Hebrew text.

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meryem  
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote meryem Replybullet Posted: 12 May 2007 at 12:47pm
Algebra
 
"The name of the G_D of the Bible is most clearly the tetragrammaton."

tetragrammaton in greek means 4 letters, do u mean four or three. cause in greek it would be trigrammaton.  tetra > four.... grammaton or gramma> letter. Τριγράμματο not Τετραγράμματο. or in latin characters as u prefer trigrammato

 
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ezkl9four  
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote ezkl9four Replybullet Posted: 12 May 2007 at 1:03pm
The Hebrew generic term for God is El (neutral), Eloha (feminine singular), Elohim (masculine plural). Any of these tenses can apply to the Most High God or to any one whom the Most High puts into positions of power and rulership.
 
The Tetragrammaton, YHVH is specific to the only true God and is only used in reference to Him. The letters of the Tetragrammaton are pronounced Yah Heh Vav Heh, which is where the pronounciation YeHoVaH comes from. English speaking people misprounce that as "JeHoVaH" because the harsh sound of the Hebrew Yah sounds like a hard "G" to them, hence "J". There are Arabic words like this too, like hajib. The original spelling is "hayib".
 
So, there are many names which apply to God. All are correct, but some are more specific and more exclusive to Him than others. Jesus knew the unique Name of God and made it known to his disciples according to John 17. Unfortunately, the Jews have left off making that Name known to people today.
 
ezkl9four


Edited by ezkl9four - 12 May 2007 at 1:04pm
Go through the midist of Jerusalem and place a mark upon those sighing and crying over the abominations committed within the midist of her.
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote thejnk Replybullet Posted: 12 May 2007 at 4:21pm
Originally posted by meryem

Algebra
 
"The name of the G_D of the Bible is most clearly the tetragrammaton."

tetragrammaton in greek means 4 letters, do u mean four or three. cause in greek it would be trigrammaton.  tetra > four.... grammaton or gramma> letter. Τριγράμματο not Τετραγράμματο. or in latin characters as u prefer trigrammato

 
fi aman allah
maryam


Tetragrammaton is an alias for the name of the god. That is Yod, He, Vau, He. Jehovah, yahveh, or however else the name was originally pronounced.



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