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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 14 February 2010 at 12:17pm

Protect Your Tongue

I have found just one way of preventing oneself from falling headlong into hell: just keep your mouth shut about others except when you speak well of them. Never speak ill of others in their absence, nor level any accusation in their presence that you cannot prove.

Moreover, if you find people engaged in backbiting and you can neither get away from the scene, nor prevent others from backbiting, immediately begin to recite Istighfar (supplication seeking pardon from Allah).

Never try to find justification for your wrong actions. Having a relationship with others does not entitle you to violate their rights. On the contrary, because of this relationship, the action of violating their rights becomes even more grave.

Telling Tales

Calumny is another form of back-biting. The Quran condemns it thus: "A slanderer, going about with calumnies." (Quran 68:11) Hudhaifah ibn al-Yaman says on the Prophet's authority that such a person will not be admitted to Paradise. The Prophet (peace and blessings be upon him) gave this special directive to his Companions:
 
"You should not convey to me any report about others for I prefer to have a clear conscience about all of you." (Abu Dawud)
 
Calumny may be done with gestures and body language as well and this is also prohibited.
 
Inter-Personal Relations-  Khurram Murad

 

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 16 February 2010 at 1:53pm

Excellence of Adopting Moderation in Dress

`Amr bin Shu`aib on the authority of his father and grandfather reported: The Messenger of Allah (peace be upon him) said:

"Allah loves to see the sign of His Bounties on his slave.''
[At-Tirmidhi].

A simple dress is commendable if one wears it as a gesture of humility winning Allah's Pleasure. Yet, to zealously pursue the goal of goodness, to extend a helping hand to the indigent and the needy, to behave favourably towards one's relatives and to wear a fine dress as a manifestation of Allah's favours are equally good acts of high merit.

A fine dress is not impeachable in itself but it becomes so, if worn with an air of arrogance and self-importance. On the other hand, an expression of Divine bounty makes it praiseworthy. In other words, it is the intention which makes an act good or bad. Alongside the practice of the example of the Messenger of Allah, the sincerity of action and making the right intention, therefore, become indispensable.


"Riyad-us-Saliheen" - Abu Zakariya Yahya

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Islamic Manners

Islam, in its legislations, aims to produce a well-balanced individual in every way: psychologically, spiritually, and materially. Many of Islam’s injunctions are specially intended for producing peace and spiritual contentment by providing verbal remembrances for a Muslim’s every activity.

When a person’s thoughts are occupied with worldly concerns and his mind is full of worry about the future and all the problems of life, he becomes plagued with stress and mental pressure that impairs his productivity and makes him less able to deal with his problems.

For this reason, Islam pays careful attention to the psychological state of the human being and sets down for him a number of verbal remembrances. These remembrances strengthen his bond with Allah and provide for him a strong psychological and spiritual inspiration if he habitually uses them. Allah says:

“Verily, in the remembrance of Allah, hearts find tranquility.”

Dale Carnegie came to realize this fact, and said: “The psychologists have realized that strong faith and adherence to religion are enough to overcome worry and nervous tension and to even cure these diseases.”

For all of these reasons, Allah’s Messenger (may the peace and blessings of Allah be upon him) took care to make these remembrances an integral part of a Muslim’s behavior and good manners. When a Muslim adheres to all of the prophetic guidance, including the remembrances, he finds within himself the sweetness of obedience and spiritual contentment. He also attains great blessings from his Lord. Above all of this, he develops a strong bond with Allah Almighty.

1. The Etiquettes of Entering and Leaving the Home

Islam views the home as a place where people seek rest, security, and peace of mind. Therefore, it sets down a number of etiquettes to help realize all of these things.

A. Greeting those inside with salâm (peace): Salâm is the salutation of the inhabitants of Paradise. Allah says:

Their supplication therein will be: ‘Glory to You, O Allah’ and their salutation therein will be: ‘Peace’.”

Allah calls Paradise the abode of peace, because of the contentment and tranquility that it contains. Peace embraces within itself all goodness; otherwise it would not have been the reward of the inhabitants of Paradise.

Allah says:

“For them will be the abode of peace with their Lord. And He will be their protector because of what they used to do.”

For this reason, a person should give the greeting of peace upon entering the home, even if no one else is inside. Allah says:

“When you enter houses, greet one another with a greeting from Allah that is blessed and good.”

The manner of this greeting is to say: “Al-Salâm `alaykum wa rahmah Allah wa barakâtuh” meaning “Peace be upon you and the mercy of Allah and His blessings.”

The proper response is: “Wa `alaykum al-salâm wa rahmah Allah wa barakâtuh” meaning: “And upon you be peace and the mercy of Allah and His blessings.”

This has been related by `A’ishah (may Allah be pleased with her). She said: “Allah’s Messenger (may the peace and blessings of Allah be upon him) said to me: ‘Jibrîl (Gabriel) recites peace upon you.’ So I said: ‘And upon him be peace and the mercy of Allah and his blessings.”

Al-Bukhârî relates the following hadîth on the authority of Jâbir (may Allah be pleased with him) in his book al-Adab al-Mufrid. Allah’s Messenger (may the peace and blessings of Allah be upon him) said: “If you enter upon your family, greet them with peace, a greeting from Allah that is blessed and good.”

He then comments: “I see this as directing towards the statement of Allah: “When you are greeted with a greeting, greet in return with a better greeting or (at least) return the same.”

B. Mentioning Allah’s name: A person entering a house should mention the name of Allah, because Satan will not remain in a place where Allah’s name is mentioned. If the home is to be a place of contentment and tranquility, it has to be free from Satan whose goal is to lead the descendants of Adam astray. Allah says:

“Verily, Satan is an enemy of yours, so take him as an enemy.”

Allah the Exalted has informed us that the weapon to use to confront this enemy is to mention Allah Almighty. Allah says:

“And if an evil whisper from Satan tries to turn you away, then seek refuge with Allah. Verily, He is the All-Hearing, All-Knowing.”


Allah’s Messenger (may the peace and blessings of Allah be upon him) has taught us what to say when entering our homes: “O Allah, verily I ask you for the best entry and the best departure. In Allah’s name we enter and with Allah’s name we leave. And upon Allah we put our trust.”

When a person wishes to leave his house, he should greet its inhabitants with peace and then depart well dressed and groomed.

He should then recite the prayer of leaving the house: “In the name of Allah; I believe in Allah, rely upon Allah, and put my trust in Allah. O Allah, verily I seek refuge with you from falling astray or leading others astray, from stumbling into error or causing others to fall into error, from being oppressed or oppressing others, and from being ignorant or facing the ignorance of others.”

It is related by Anas (may Allah be pleased with him) that Allah’s Messenger (may the peace and blessings of Allah be upon him) said: “Whoever says (when leaving from his house): ‘In the name of Allah, I put my trust in Allah. There is no might or power except with Allah.’, then it will be said to him: ‘You are sufficed, you are protected, you have been guided, and you are saved from Satan’.”

http://www.imanway.com/site/en/islam56.htm

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Generosity
 
In Islam, it is an anathema to give away in charity what is shoddy and inferior. There is parsimony and miserliness in this. The Muslim tradition is to give away from what one loves; God blesses this charity and extends its goodness.

Generosity is one of the highest virtues of Islam and one of the manifest qualities of the Prophet (peace be upon him), who was known as the most generous person. The word for generosity here is derived from karam, which also means nobility. In fact, one of the most excellent names of God is al-Kareem, the Generous. It is better to go beyond the minimum of what the Sacred law demands when giving Charity. This generosity is an expression of gratitude to God, who is the Provider of all wealth and provision.

[Purification of the Heart]
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"Whoever receives a favor and says to the doer, "JazakAllahu khair (May Allah grant you a good reward)," has excelled in his appreciation."
 
 [Al-Tirmidhi]
 
 
Jazakallahu Khairan
 
This is a statement of thanks and appreciation to be said to the person who does a favour. Instead of saying "thanks" (Shukran), this phrase is used. It means: "May Allah reward you for the good."
 

"Glosssary of Islamic Terms" - Aisha Bewley
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MODESTY STEMS FROM FAITH

As related by Ibn Umar, Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) passed by a Muslim from Medina who was telling his brother to stop being modest and said to him:

“Leave him as he is; for modesty stems from faith.”

(Bukhari, Faith 16; Muslim, Faith 57-59)

Every Muslim who believes in Allah -the All-hearing, All-seeing and All-knowing- knows that a person is not alone even if no one is at his side. He is always in the presence of his Lord. The awareness of this helps a person to develop a system of auto-control. Modesty finds its source in this sensitivity and prevents a person from doing wrong.

The feeling of modesty tops the list of characteristics that distinguish man from other animate things. There is a widespread belief that modesty puts a person to a disadvantage in the modern world. However, the obstacle to getting one’s right is not the existence of modesty, but the person’s weakness, shyness, cowardice and inefficiency. It should not be forgotten that sahaba (companions of the Prophet) women have been praised for conveying the most private questions a woman could ask to the Prophet, because their modesty did not prevent them from learning their religion.

According to Imam Ghazzali, one of the signs of a child’s mental maturity is the emergence of the feeling of modesty, and he says that this period is the best time to begin the child’s education. In Islamic thought, because the mind is a vehicle for both mental and moral enlightenment, a genuine belief in Allah which can be instilled in a child’s mind will have prepared a strong foundation for training of the conscience and behavior. Different character and personality make-ups that will appear after this in the social structure will be accepted as a source of enrichment. Just so long as it is not forgotten that the race for superiority can only be to increase goodness.

The Prophet, peace upon him, said, “Every religion has a defining characteristic, and the defining characteristic of my religion is modesty.”Ibn Majah #4181

The Prophet, peace upon him, mentioned, “By shy before Allah as is His full right.” We said, “O Messenger of Allah! We are shy before Him, and all praise is for Allah.” He said, “That is not what I mean. Rather, to be shy before Allah as is His full right is that you guard your head and everything associated with it [ears, eyes, etc.]; and that you guard your stomach and what it consumes; and you should remember death and the time you will be decomposed. One who desires the hereafter leaves off chasing the adornment of the world. Whosoever does all of this has been shy before Allah as is His full right.”

 Tirmidhi #2458
 
 
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Humility in Islam

Muslims constantly strive to remember and practice Islamic virtues, and put them into practice throughout their daily lives. Among these great Islamic virtues are submission to Allah, self-restraint, discipline, sacrifice, patience, brotherhood, generosity, and humility.

In English, the word "humility" comes from the Latin root word which means "ground." Humility, or being humble, means that one is modest, submissive and respectful, not proud and arrogant. You lower yourself to the ground, not elevate yourself above others. In prayer, Muslims prostrate themselves to the ground, acknowledging human beings' lowliness and humility before the Lord of the Worlds ...

http://islam.about.com/od/prayer/a/humility.htm

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Taking pains to remove the pains of others is the true essence of generosity.

 [Abu Bakr radi Allah anhu]

SHEIKH HAMZA YUSUF GENEROSITY IN ISLAM PT: 1/4

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Helping Others to Reconcile their Differences
 
When people live together in harmony, life is beautiful. How good it is when all members of society get along with each other in a spirit of mutual respect and mutual affection. It is a sign of our faith in Allah when we deal with people in kindness and fellowship.

It is also part of human nature to seek the fulfillment of our needs. Some of these needs are material, like food, clothing, and shelter. There are other needs which are intangible, but which are just as important to a balanced existence. Human beings are social creatures. They need other people. They need meaningful relationships. For social relationships to be healthy and beneficial, they must be based upon personal dignity mutual respect. Problems arise when such respect and dignity are lacking.

Mutual respect does not require a close relationship, since the basis for all human interaction is that of human dignity. Allah says: "And truly We have honored the progeny of Adam." [Sűrah al-Isrâ': 70]

Therefore, respect is the underlying principle for our social existence.

Problems between people are inevitable. However, because people are social creatures, they cannot retreat into seclusion whenever problems arise. It is not always possible simply to avoid a person just because that person has done something wrong or hurt our feelings. People need to be able to live together.

Therefore, it is crucial that people find a way to coexist that guarantees societal cohesion and allows them to fulfill their social needs. Allah says: "O mankind! We created you from a single (pair) of a male and a female, and made you into nations and tribes, that you might get to know each other. Verily the most honored of you in the sight of Allah is (he who is) the most righteous." [Sűrah al-Hujurât: 13]

Yes. We need to get to know each other, just as Allah commanded us. We must deal with each other on a footing of equality and fairness, guided by our piety. The Prophet (peace be upon him) said: "None of you truly believes until he loves for his brother – or neighbor – what he loves for himself." [Sahîh Muslim (64)]

Problems will take place between people, no matter how sincere we try to be. We make mistakes, and at times that is part of our growth, since we learn from our mistakes. The problem is not that we will fall into disagreements or have disputes. The problem is when we fail to understand how to resolve them. Sometimes, even our most well-meaning attempts to make things better go wrong, and we only manage to exacerbate the situation.

At times, when there is a grievance between two people, we might want to intervene and resolve it. However, we must be careful not to aid someone in injustice or in denying someone else what is his or her right. The Prophet (peace be upon him) made this clear to us when he said: "Help your brother, whether he is the wrongdoer or the one who is wronged."

The Companions were certainly surprised by this statement. They said: "We understand how to help our brother when he is wronged. But how do we help him when he is the wrongdoer?"

The Prophet (peace be upon him) said: "Stop him from doing wrong. That is how you help him." [Sahîh al-Bukhârî (6438)]

This is a distinction we need to keep in mind when settling other people's disputes. We help a wrongdoer by getting that person to stop his or her wrongful behavior. We help someone who has been wronged by restoring to that person his or her rights.

The question remains as to what we do when neither party in a dispute is willing to budge. How do we break the deadlock? How do we reconcile their hearts?

1. Seek the help of insightful mediators

Not everyone is capable of putting various situations into perspective and of seeing things from opposing perspectives. These are unique talents.

Allah describes the type of person a mediator should be when he says: "And if you fear a breach between the (husband and wife), then appoint a judicious arbiter from his people and one from her people " [Sűrah al-Nisâ': 35]

And when He says: " So when they have reached their prescribed time, then retain them (in marriage) with kindness or separate them with kindness, and take for witness two persons from among you, endued with justice." [Sűrah al-Talâq: 2]

Therefore, an arbiter should possess insightfulness (wisdom) and be a just person. This is the only way to ensure that he or she will not inadvertently bring injustice upon either party to the dispute.

2. Do not resort to mere personal opinion in declaring something wrong

Even when we make an initial determination of fault, we also need to consider the outlook of the people involved. We must consider how they weigh the seriousness of various infringements. Some people might consider a certain act to be trivial while others consider it a problem of massive proportions. We need to take these differences of perspective into consideration. They are often the result of a person's environment, upbringing, or cultural norms.

3. Distinguish between actions & reactions

When someone does something wrong to another person, we need to identify the reasons behind the action in order to remedy it.

When the other person, in turn, reacts to the wrongdoing, we need to approach the matter a bit differently. Maybe the reaction was minor in comparison to the initial grievance. On he other hand, maybe the reaction was severe, so much so that it has manifested itself as a further problem in its own right. In this case, we need to advise both the initial wrongdoer and the one who overreacted in a suitable manner.

The perpetrator of the initial wrong needs to be prevented from persisting in his wrongdoing. Amends need to be made. The person who overreacted to that wrongdoing needs, in turn, to be placated. We need to be reminded him of the virtue of controlling our anger and of maintaining the moral high ground.

4. Distinguish between the restoration of rights & the virtue of clemency

It is critical to make this distinction. When attempting reconciliation between two people, we cannot gloss over legitimate grievances, nor can we fail to restore to the aggrieved party his or her rights. We cannot seek a mere cosmetic reconciliation by extolling the virtues of forgiveness, patience and clemency.

We need to emphasize the rights to which each the various parties to a dispute have a legitimate claim. We must assist the wronged parties to get those rights restored. This is the way to maintain people's relationships with one another on a sound basis.

The Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) is an excellent example for us in this matter. Once, he was straightening the ranks of the soldiers. He taped them into place using a thin tooth-stick. However, one of his Companions complained that he had injured him when he tapped him with the stick.

In response to this complaint, the Prophet (peace be upon him) calmly opened up his shirt and invited the Companion to strike him in turn. The Prophet (peace be upon him) did this, even though he had not intended to injure the person in the least. At this point, the Companion kissed the Prophet on the place where he was to hit him back.

We can draw two valuable lessons from this account.
a. We should hasten to make amends when we do wrong to others, even when we did not intend to do anything wrong. We should always do our best to maintain good relations with others.

b. We should make a distinction between the restoration of rights and expectations of clemency. We can see that the Prophet (peace be upon him) did not lecture that Companion on the virtues of patience, brotherhood, and forgiveness. He did not accuse the Companion of having a bad opinion of him. He simply offered to make amends.
Alas, today, we often add insult to injury when dealing with someone who has been wronged, criticizing the aggrieved party for not exercising patience and forbearance in adversity when all that is really needed is to simply make amends.

We see the same degree of judiciousness when `Umar, at the time he was Caliph, ruled that the Coptic Christian should disgrace Ibn `Amr b. al`-As publicly in the same way that Ibn `Amr had disgraced the Copt publicly. When people know that they will be made to live up to the consequences of their wrongdoing, this will prevent them from engaging in wrongdoing in the first place.

Finally, we need to recognize that, when it comes to the party who has been wronged, we need to make a distinction between those who are in a position of strength and those who are in a position of weakness. A person who possesses authority or who is in a strong position should be reminded of the virtues of clemency and be encouraged to pardon a wrongdoer. However, a person who is weak and does so out of fear or shame is not exercising a virtue. That person is simply being made to suffer further. The best way to restore social harmony and cohesion in this case is by redressing that person's injuries.

And Allah knows best.
 
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“Until he loves for his brother what he loves for himself”
 
Anas relates that the Prophet (peace be upon him) said:
 
 “None of you truly believes until he loves for his brother what he loves for himself.”
[Sahîh al-Bukhârî and Sahîh Muslim]
 
Al-Jurjânî says about it: “This hadith is one of the foundations of Islam.”
 
It is a most eloquent summary of how a Muslim is supposed to conduct himself with others. Al-Nawawî relates to us that Ibn Abî Zayd, the leading jurist in Morocco of his time, said: “All the etiquettes of virtue can be derived from four hadith – ” Then he mentioned the following statements of the Prophet (peace be upon him):
 
1. “Whoever believes in Allah and the Last Day should say something good or remain silent.”
2. “ From the perfection of a person’s Islam is his leaving alone what does not concern him.”
3. “Do not get angry”
4. “None of you truly believes until he loves for his brother what he loves for himself.”
 
This hadîth shows how people are supposed to relate to each other. It negates base emotions such as envy and establishes the vision of a society based on mutual responsibility and caring.
 
This hadith is not saying that a person becomes an unbeliever for failing to hold in his heart such love for others. It is merely stating that his belief is deficient.
 
This is made clearer by a narration in Musnad Ahmad that reads: “A worshipper does not attain the truth of faith until he loves for the people what he loves for himself of good.”
 
This is similar to many other statements of the Prophet (peace be upon him), like:
 
“By Allah he does not believe… whose neighbor is not safe from his abuse.” [Musnad Ahmad]
 
What is being said is that a person’s faith is incomplete, that the roots of faith are not firmly embedded in a person’s heart and soul.
 
This hadith shows the humanity of Islam. A person cannot be considered to be fully a believer until he loves for others what he loves for himself. This meaning is not restricted to his fellow Muslims; it applies to all humanity. Indeed, the Prophet (peace be upon him) said: “Love for the people what you love for yourself and you will be a believer.” [Sunan Ibn Mâjah]

http://en.islamtoday.net/artshow-427-3219.htm

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 09 March 2010 at 1:47pm

Excellence in all things

"Verily, Allah has prescribed (Kataba) excellence (Ihsan) in all things."

Ihsan is a very vast concept. It embodies both the concept of perfecting a deed in itself as well as doing excellence towards others. In this hadith, it seems that Allah is requiring both types of Ihsan. However, the more apparent meaning is the concept of performing an act in the best way possible. But this also implies doing well to others, beyond the minimum expected, as this is the best way to treat others.

The order of Ihsan is sometimes an obligatory order and sometimes a recommended order. For example, the order to have Ihsan towards one's parents or one's visitors is an obligatory type of Ihsan. The order to give voluntary charity is also an order of Ihsan but, obviously, in this case, it is only a recommended form and not a required one.

The important point that should be emphasized is that Ihsan is sought after. Allah has requested it and it is very pleasing to Him. Hence, regardless of which level it is, obligatory or recommended, every true believer should seek the quality of Ihsan in all of his deeds. He should realize that there is a level of Ihsan that is beyond that which he should strive for in all of his deeds.

Ihsan is not simply in matters of worship. Instead, this concept should rule a person's behaviour in every realm of his life. When dealing with others, the principle of Ihsan should dominate how he works and deals with others. He must fulfill their rights, this is the obligatory level of Ihsan. However, he should also try to go beyond that and be, for lack of a better phrase, "better than them". He should treat them beyond the minimum that is required of him.

"Commentary on the Forty Hadith of al-Nawawi" - Jamaal al-Din M. Zarabozo


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Ihsan in Relationships

No relationship can be established on measuring constantly whether one has fulfilled one's obligations. One should not be very particular about one's own rights, with a view to ensuring that one gets all that is one's due. Rather, one should be ever-ready to do favours for others.

A strictly business-like relationship may work. However, this would be lacking in mutual love, gratitude, sacrifice, sincerity and warmth, which are so important in life. Doing good stands for excellent conduct, generous dealings, a sympathetic attitude, good manners, forgiveness and making allowances. One should be prepared to accept less than one's due and give others more than what they deserve. This point is eloquently made in the following hadith:

"O Allah! Let me maintain ties with him who severs these. Let me grant him his due that deprives me of what is due to me. Let me forgive him who wrongs me." (Mishkat)

In other words, this character trait demands that one should give others over and above what is their due. More importantly, one should do good to him who wrongs one. For true believers are those who repulse evil with their good deeds.


"Inter Personal Relations" - Khurram Murad

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Righteousness is Good Character

On the Authority of Al-Nawwaas ibn Samaan (may Allah be pleased with him) from the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allah be upon him) who said, "Righteousness (birr) is good character (khuluq)." Recorded by Muslim.

The word birr is used in two senses. The first is treating others in a good fashion. If this is the usage intended by the Prophet in this particular statement, then the hadith must be understood to mean, "Good character is essential to righteous dealings with others."

The second sense in which birr is used refers to all acts of worship and obedience to Allah, both inward and outward. If this is what the Prophet meant in this hadith, it can be understood as, "Righteousness is good khuluq," in the general sense of khuluq as explained below.

One's khuluq is a combination of understanding, intention and deeds, with the last two aspects playing the most important role. If a person has good intentions followed by good deeds, it is said that he has good character or good morals. If a person has bad intentions followed up by evil deeds, it is said that he has bad character or bad morals.

Among many Muslims today, there is a misconception concerning khuluq. If a person is kind, nice and sweet, they say that he has a good character or khuluq. They may say this even if the person does not pray or fast, for example. One may even hear the statement, "He does not pray but he has a good character." This demonstrates a lack of understanding of the Islamic concept of khuluq and its all-inclusive nature.

Khuluq is often divided into three categories: khuluq with respect to the Creator, khuluq with respect to other humans and khuluq with respect to oneself. Two other categories should be added to the commonly mentioned three categories: khuluq with respect to all the other creatures that Allah has created, and khuluq with respect to the Earth and all of its natural resources. All of these categories comprise a person's khuluq. For a person to have good khuluq he must have good khuluq with respect to all of the different categories of khuluq. It is not sufficient to be good in one category and then fail with respect to the other categories.


"Commentary on the Forty Hadith of al-Nawawi" - Jamaal al-Din Zarabozo

La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 16 March 2010 at 9:48am

Personal Inner Qualities needed for Brotherhood- Mercy

  • A study of the Quran and Sunnah indicates that there are two inner qualities which form the foundation of this relationship of brotherhood (ukhuwwah) and love (hubb) among the Believers for the sake of Allah alone.
  • The first quality is the presence of Rahmah or Mercy. And the second is the feeling of Zull or Humility. When the Quran describes the Muslims it uses these two words to explain the state of their relationship: "they are merciful amongst themselves" [Surah al-Fath: 29] and "they have an attitude (a state of heart and mind) of humility towards the others" [Surah al-Hashr: 9-10].
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  • These two are essential not only for a successful interpersonal relationship but also for the cohesion of any jama'ah (or organization). We know that Rasul Allah himself has been described as Rahmatal lil 'Alameen (a Mercy for the Worlds). But in one place the Quran goes on to say "The Prophet is dearly compassionate ('azeez), kind (ra'oof) and merciful (raheem) to his followers" [Surah al-Tawbah: 128].
  • In another place the Quran says "It is only Allah's mercy that you (O Muhammad) are soft hearted to them. Were you hard in heart and crude and rough in your attitude all these people who are now flocking around you would have flown away" [Surah ale-’Imran:159].
  • It is not simply the Message but the Messenger's mercy and compassion that made people bind to the da'wah and jama'ah which was being built. This mercy, which is Allah's main attribute, is also the Prophet's attribute, and must therefore be enforced in all our conduct.
  • If I want to describe all the do's and do not's it will take perhaps a few hours, but if we want to simplify it, mercy cannot allow abusing, mercy cannot allow ridiculing, mercy cannot allow backbiting, mercy cannot allow saying words that which will hurt.
  • Actually mercy will encompass in it hundreds of things which off course have been elaborated in both Hadith and Quran. So the Hadith says "Be merciful to those who are on earth and He Who is in the heavens will be merciful to you!"

[ "Interpersonal Relationships" - Khurram Murad]

La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah
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