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a well wisher  
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 22 March 2010 at 8:48am

The Small Charity

"Do not belittle even the smallest act of kindness, even if it were no more than meeting your brother with a smiling and cheerful face." [Muslim]
"Guard against the fire, even though it be with half a date. And, if anyone does not have even that much, he should do so with a good word." [Bukhari]

We should never consider any charity too small or not worth doing or giving. Some people cannot bring themselves to  utter a kind and pleasant word. It will not cost a penny to say a good word, but so miserly have we become that we are not even prepared to utter a word of kindness, praise and encouragement. It will make a lot of difference to our spouses, siblings, and neighbours - be they Muslim or non-Muslim - if we were to be loving and kind in all our inter-personal relationships.

"In the Early Hours" - Khurram Murad
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 31 March 2010 at 6:50am
Feeding the Guest

A sahabi (companion of the Prophet) came to the Prophet (peace be upon him) and complained of hunger and distress. Just then, the Prophet (peace be upon him) had nothing in hand, or in his house, to feed him. He asked the sahaba if anyone would entertain him as a guest tonight on his behalf? One of the ansars said that they would do that.

The ansari took the person to his house and instructed his wife, "Look here, this man is a guest of the Prophet. We will entertain the best as we can."

The wife replied "By Allah! I have no food in the house, except a very little something just enough for the children."
 
The husband suggested his wife to put the children to sleep without feeding them, while he sits with the guest over the meager meal. He told his wife that when they start eating, put out the lamp pretending to set it right, so that the guest may not become aware of my not sharing the meal with him.

The scheme worked very well, and the whole family, including the children stayed hungry to enable the guest to eat to his full.

It was over this incident that Allah revealed the verse:

“They prefer others above themselves, even though poverty becomes their lot” (59:9)

http://www.spiritofislam.com/manners/feeding_guest.php

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 12 April 2010 at 3:01pm

Deal With People in a Good Manner

Allah repeatedly tells us in the Qur'an to observe good manners in our dealings with others. He says,

(Hold to forgiveness (O Muhammad), command what is right, but turn away from the ignorant.) (Al-A`raf 7:199)

Allah also says,

(The good deed and the evil deed are not alike. Repel (the evil deed) with one which is better; then lo! he, between whom and you there was enmity, (will become) as though he were a bosom friend.) (Fussilat 41:34)

The Prophet (peace and blessings be upon him) is the perfect example of what it means to possess good manners. Allah says, describing him,

(And you (stand) on an exalted standard of character) (Al-Qalam 68:4).

The Prophet (peace and blessings be upon him) emphasized how good manners are of paramount importance in Islam when he said, "I was sent only to perfect good manners" (authenticated by Al-Albani).

Indeed, he tells us that good manners are part of faith. He said, "The believers with the most complete faith are those who have the best manners" (At-Tirmidhi and Abu Dawud).

Among the good manners that we should cultivate is to be sensible in our dealings with others and to abstain from reacting hastily when they do what displeases us.

The Prophet (peace and blessings be upon him) said to Ashaj `Abd Al-Qays, "You possess within yourself two qualities that Allah loves: discernment and deliberateness" (Muslim).

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 16 April 2010 at 3:08pm

Human Rights in Islam

The theory of human rights in Islam has a strong spiritual dimension. The human being is directly accountable to his Lord. It is not just a matter of accountability before the law. Honoring the rights of other human beings is a means by which a person can become elevated in the sight of his Lord – or debased if he does not honor those rights. In other words, the issue of upholding human rights becomes a means by which a person’s fate in the Hereafter can be sealed.

Indeed, the Prophet (peace be upon him) describes how a person can arrive “bankrupt” on the Day of Judgment without any good deeds to his credit, simply because he failed to uphold the rights of others.

Abű Hurayrah relates in Sahîh Muslim: The Prophet (peace be upon him) asked us: “Do you know who is bankrupt?” We replied: “The one among us who is bankrupt is someone who has neither gold nor silver nor any provision.”

The Prophet (peace be upon him) then said: “Among my people, the one who is bankrupt is the one who – after praying, fasting, and paying charity – arrives on the Day of Judgment having cursed one person and slandered another, assaulted another, and misappropriated the wealth of someone else. Then those people will be given of his good deeds, and if his good deeds run out before redress is made, then some of their sins will be taken from them and put upon him. Then he will be cast into Hell.”


The Prophet (peace be upon him) said: “The best of you is the one who exhibits the best ethical conduct.” [Sahîh al-Bukhârî and Sahîh Muslim]
This ethical conduct is none other than to uphold the rights of others and safeguard their honor.

Islam teaches us to determine the rights of others by considering our own rights. A person may well know what his own rights are, but fail to honor the rights of others. This is why the Prophet (peace be upon him) said: “None of you believes until he loves for his brother what he loves for himself.” [Sahîh al-Bukhârî and Sahîh Muslim]

He also said: “Treat others how you wish to be treated.” [Sahîh Muslim]

In this way, Islam raises the devoted Muslim above selfishness. A Muslim should not act as if the world revolves around him, thinking only to safeguard his own rights and considering nothing of the rights that others have over him.

Islam has come with a concept that no body of legislation has addressed. This is the notion of “oppression of the self”. Islam seeks to preserves the person from transgressing the rights that he has over his own person. Allah says: “And whoever does evil or oppresses his soul, then asks forgiveness of Allah, he shall find Allah forgiving, merciful.” [Sűrah al-Nisâ’: 110]

Allah says: “We did them no injustice, but they were unjust to themselves.” [Sűrah al-Nahl: 118]

Islam has made the individual responsible to police his own conduct in how he fulfills the rights of others. At the same time, Islam has placed in its sacred law legal injunctions to safeguard those rights, in the context of a painstakingly detailed understanding of inter-personal ethics. In this context, it presents a formidable corpus of law to ensure human rights, the rights of women, spousal rights, the rights of citizens, and the rights of children, the rights of labor, and the rights of property owners. These rights, in turn, exist within the context of civil rights, political rights, and economic rights.

To prevent injustice, Islam has come with clear and precise ethical injunctions. These are put in place to ensure that the human being can live in dignity, with freedom of speech, or vocation, and of religion.

Allah says: “Let there be no compulsion in religion.” [Sűrah al-Baqarah: 256]

Allah details many of the civic rights that people have over each other in Sűrah al-Hujurât, verses 11-12:

O you who believe! Let not a folk deride a folk who may be better than they (are), nor let women (deride) women who may be better than they are; neither defame one another, nor insult one another by (offensive) nicknames. Bad is the name of lewdness after faith. And whoever does not turn in repentance, such are evil-doers.

O you who believe! Shun much suspicion; for lo! some suspicion is a crime. And spy not, neither backbite one another. Would one of you love to eat the flesh of his dead brother? You would abhor it. And keep your duty (to Allah). Lo! Allah is relenting, merciful.

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 20 April 2010 at 3:14pm
Good Council with Gentleness and Mercy
 
 
"With Allah's mercy you treated them gently. If you had been rough and hard-hearted, undoubtedly they would have dispersed from around you..." (Surat Al-i Imran, 159). The description in the Quran of the Prophet (pbuh)'s approach to people is: "With Allah's mercy you treated them gently." Refraining from roughness and hard-heartedness and being gentle is mentioned as a manifestation and result of Allah's mercy. This and similar expressions describing the Prophet's character and his approach towards people actually points to characteristics of the Prophet that all believers should possess.

How should our approach be towards other people, particularly those with beliefs and ideas different from ours? Should we reject them or embrace them? What should be the yardstick for our attitude and approach towards them? Undoubtedly, all these are vitally important in establishing sound relations among people, and the Prophet's life is full of important foundation stones on this subject.

As extensions of mercy and compassion in man's life, gentleness, compassion, forgiveness and affection are very important in Islam. They are seen as essential values that need to be taken as a basis in human relationships. Furthermore, evaluating the universe and man's life as a harmonious whole within a framework of the creed of Tawhid (Unity), Islam builds man's relationships with both the natural world and his social environment on these basic values: mercy and goodness. A believer equipped with these values is constructive, not corruptive; positive, not negative; and forgiving, not revengeful towards his natural and social environment. This attitude and approach of believers begins in relations with closest family relatives and expands outwardly in circles towards his whole social and natural environment. Pointing out that compassion is an extension of Allah's mercy, the Prophet emphasizes the importance of this basic value saying, "Those who do not act with mercy will not be treated with mercy." Also, when a man who saw the Prophet showing affection to children said he never showed love to his children or kissed them, the Prophet said, "If God removed mercy from your heart, what can I do," thus indicating how important love, mercy and good behavior are in a believer's life (Buhari, Adab 18; Muslim, Fadail 65). Mercy and love shown to his children, wife and other family members by a believing individual expands to his surroundings, circle by circle, thus becoming a memorial of mercy to his environment. In this manner, it is seen that these qualities should be shown not only to close family members or other believers, but they should be reflected towards all of mankind. Even when a person has to struggle against others, still these qualities should give direction to a believing individual's attitude and approach. The Quran gives a basic yardstick to all believers in the personality of the Prophet: "Call people to God's path with wisdom and good guidance. Discuss with them in the best manner..." (Al-Nahl 125).

The wisdom of human relations in Islam is good council and the principle of giving precedence to mercy. In relation to being a human being, seeing others as one with himself and showing empathy in relationships with others is a guide given to believing people. The advice of the Prophet to want for others what you want for yourself or not to do to others what you do not want done to yourself are not just warnings and advice to Muslims, but each is a basic moral principle for all mankind on a universal level. They are basic values that must be ascribed to in order for people to be able to live together in peace and sustain their existence in an environment of mutual respect.
 
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 25 April 2010 at 1:34am
Watching What We Say
 
The Qur’ân gives us a clear and precise approach to verifying the truth about what we say. To begin with, the Qur’ân says:
 
“Indeed We have made the communications clear for a people who are sure.” [Sűrah al-Baqarah: 118]

In this verse, Allah has singled out the “people who are sure” since these are the one’s who verify the truth about thing. They are the one’s who seek evidence and strive for accuracy and certainty. These are the people who truly benefit from a message that is free from doubt, since they are not satisfied with mere words and claims, but seek after certainty.

Allah says: “O ye who believe! If a sinful person comes to you with any news, ascertain the truth, lest you harm people unwittingly and afterwards become full of regret for what you have done.” [Sűrah al-Hujurât: 6]

This verse provides an essential principle of Islamic teachings. It instructs us to pay attention to the character and circumstances of a person who tells us something. We are not supposed to passively accept all the rumors and doubtful claims that circulate in society. ...
 
 
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 29 April 2010 at 1:06am

Kindness to the Poor

The Prophet, peace be upon him, said:

"Do not turn away a poor man...even if all you can give is half a date.

If you love the poor and bring them near you...God will bring you near Him on the Day of Resurrection."

(Hadith in Al-Tirmidhi)

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 03 May 2010 at 8:41am
Judging Others
 
As Muslims, the default assumption we should have about other people in any matter is that they are free of blame. Islam demands fairness and impartiality when it comes to judging others.
 
Allah says: "And when you speak, then be just, though it be (against) a relative." [Sűrah al-An`âm: 152]
 
He also says: "O you who believe! stand out firmly for Allah, as witnesses to fair dealing, and let not the hatred of any people make you swerve to wrong and depart from justice. Be just: that is next to piety: and fear Allah. For Allah is well-acquainted with all that you do." [Sűrah al-Mâ'idah: 8]
 
It is wrong for a person to accuse anyone else of something wrong except with full knowledge and tangible proof. It is forbidden to base a judgment against someone on hearsay, conjecture or suspicion.
 
Allah says: "O you who believe! If a wicked person comes to you with any news, ascertain the truth, lest you harm people unwittingly, and afterwards become full of repentance for what you have done." [Sűrah al-Hujurât: 5]
 
He also warns us: "O you who believe! Shun much suspicion; for lo! some suspicion is a sin." [Sűrah al-Hujurât: 12]
 
In those cases where one is compelled to mention another person's faults, it is best to mention that person's good points as well. It is wrong to exaggerate the importance of the person's error or stress the fault too much, especially if it is possible that the error was an honest mistake or in a matter where the truth is not 100% clear.
 
If a person's error is clearly manifest and established by solid evidence, then it is not wrong to warn people against the error and clarify the truth. However, that correction must be carried out appropriately, in a gentle manner that does not drive people away. The mistake itself should be corrected without delving into anything beyond that.
 
 
 
 
 

 


Edited by a well wisher - 03 May 2010 at 8:42am
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 03 May 2010 at 4:37pm

Mercy Between Mankind

Mercy’ is one of the foremost ethical characteristics that Islam emphasises between mankind.  Behind every good act that a person performs is some element of mercy... 

Mankind show love to one another based on this one portion of mercy, it leaves one in awe as to how Merciful Allah will be to man on the Day of Judgment, far more merciful than a devoted mother to her child.

In Islam, the most worthy recipients of a person’s mercy are his immediate family. Children are a gift to mankind; as a result love and affection are crucial for their development in the early stages of their lives. 

http://www.mercyofallah.com/about/mercy3.html

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 17 May 2010 at 5:17pm

The Ideal Personality of the Muslim

His attitude towards people

With his parents, the Muslim is an example of sincere filial piety. He treats them with kindness and respect, infinite compassion, utter politeness and deep gratitude. He recognizes their status and knows his duties towards them. Allah Says (what means): "And serve Allah. Ascribe nothing as partner unto Him. (Show) kindness unto parents..." [Qur'an 4: 36]

With his wife, the Muslim exemplifies good and kind treatment, intelligent handling, deep understanding of the nature and psychology of women, and proper fulfillment of his responsibilities and duties. 

With his children, the Muslim is a parent who understands his great responsibility towards them which is, as well as flooding them with love and compassion, to pay attention to anything that may influence their Islamic development and give them proper education, so that they become active and constructive elements in society, and a source of goodness for their parents, community, and society as a whole. 

With his relatives, the Muslim maintains the ties of kinship and knows his duties towards them. He understands the high status given to relatives in Islam, which makes him keep in touch with them, no matter what the circumstances.

With his neighbors, the Muslim illustrates good treatment and consideration of others' feelings and sensitivities. He puts up with mistreatment and turns a blind eye to his neighbor's faults while taking care not to commit any such errors himself.

The Muslim relationship with his brothers and friends is the best and purest of relationships, for it is based on love for the sake of Allah. He is loving, not cold towards them; he is loyal and does not betray them; he is sincere and does not cheat them; he is gentle and never harsh; he is tolerant and forgiving; he is generous and he supplicates for them (his brothers and friends).

In his social relationships with all people, the Muslim is well-mannered, civil and noble, characterized by the attitudes which Islam encourages.

The Muslim does not envy others. He fulfils his promises. He has the attitude of shyness. He is cheerful. He is not pushy. He is patient. He avoids slandering or uttering obscenities. He does not unjustly accuse others. He is shy and modest. He does not interfere in that which does not concern him. He refrains from gossiping, spreading slander and stirring up trouble. He avoids false speech and suspicion.

When he is entrusted with a secret, he keeps it. He is modest and never arrogant. He does not make fun of anyone. He respects his elders. He mixes with the best of people.  He strives to reconcile between the Muslims. He calls others to Islam with wisdom and beautiful preaching. He visits the sick and attends funerals. He returns favors and is grateful for them. He guides people to do good. He always likes to make things easy and not difficult.

The Muslim is fair in his judgments ...

http://www.islamicity.com/articles/Articles.asp?ref=IW1001-4068

 

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 02 June 2010 at 12:31am
Sharing the Joy of Giving

What a great quality to instill in our children: the joy of giving. If we could share with our own children the joy that giving can bring, they can feel for themselves the spirit of sharing and distributing the blessings that Allah has bestowed on them ...

http://www.islamicity.com/articles/Articles.asp?ref=JM0708-3345
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 06 June 2010 at 12:43am

Rights of Neighbors in Islam

Prophet Muhammad, peace be upon him, said,

"He who believes in Allah and the Last Day let him not harm his neighbour; and he who believes in Allah and the Last Day let him show hospitality to his guest; and he who believes in Allah and the Last Day let him speak good or remain silent".

[Hadith in Sahih Al-Bukhari and Sahih Muslim].

Commentary: This Hadith unfolds the fruits of Faith. One who does not have the qualities mentioned in it, is deprived of the blessings of the Faith. Faith of such a person is like a fruitless tree, or a flower without fragrance, or a body without soul.

http://www.muhammad.net/morals-and-manners-mainmenu-66.html

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 14 June 2010 at 11:44pm
Patience in Islam as Taught by Prophet Muhammad, peace be upon him

Part of a talk by Sheikh Hamza Yusuf on the virtue of patience and following the example of our beloved prophet, peace be upon him

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=alx3q8Om30Y
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 24 June 2010 at 12:34am

Etiquettes of Seeking Islamic Knowledge

Etiquettes Pertaining to the Student’s Relationship with His Lord:

1. The student should be sincere to Allah in his intentions for seeking knowledge. He should not seek Islamic knowledge for fame or status...

Etiquettes Pertaining to the Student’s Relationship with His Teachers:

1. The student should take as much care as he can to select teachers known for their piety, humility, and religious commitment...

http://islamtoday.com/artshow-421-3073.htm
 


Edited by Al-Cordoby - 24 June 2010 at 12:34am
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