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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 03 September 2009 at 8:16pm
 
Someone asked Hatim al-Asamm (may Allah the Exalted bestow His mercy upon him) : "On what basis have you developed this special condition of yours, this absolute trust in the Lord [tawakkul]?"
 
To this he replied:"I have chosen four things to know, and have discarded all the knowledge in the world besides." :
 
"(1) I came to realize that my sustenance will not be consumed by anyone other than myself, so I should not be concerned about it;
 
(2) I came to realize that my work will not be done by anyone other than myself, so I must be busy about it;
 
(3) I came to realize that death may come suddenly and unexpectedly, so I must waste no time in order to forestall it;
 
(4) I came to realize that I am in the sight of Allah (Exalted is He) in every condition and circumstance, so I must behave with due modesty under His gaze."

 
 
La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah
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"There was once a man, we are told, who never held his head up to the sky in all of forty years; so great were his modesty and humility before God, Glorified is He.

Some people assumed that al-Rabi' ibn Khaytham must be blind, because he always lowered his head and kept his eyes half-closed. For twenty years he was a regular visitor to the home of Ibn Mas'ud. When the latter's maidservant saw him, she would say to her master: 'Your blind friend is here.' Ibn Mas'ud used to laugh when she said this. Whenever she went to answer the guest's knock at the door, she would see him with his head down and his eyes averted. Ibn Mas'ud would look at him and say, quoting from the Quran:

    'And give good tidings to the humble.' [al-Hajj, 22:34] (Wa-bashshiri-lmukhbitin.)"

~Inner Dimensions of Islamic Worship by Al-Ghazali 



Edited by a well wisher - 04 September 2009 at 2:22pm
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 06 September 2009 at 3:17pm
 
 
In ‘Hilyat al-Awliya” (10/287), it’s related that al-Junayd said:


الإنسان لا يعاب بما في طبعه إنما يعاب إذا فعل بما في طبعه


“A person is not to be blamed for his nature. Rather, he is to be blamed if he acts according to his nature.”

This is a very deep statement.


A person should not bring his status as an imperfect human being to serve as an excuse for manifesting blameworthy characteristics and actions. Yes, we were fashioned with varying degrees of negative attributes within us, such as envy, greed, lack of gratitude, arrogance, etc.



However, we were also fashioned with the ability to repel, change, and strive against the inclinations to openly manifest them.


It is possible to abandon negative traits you find in yourself and change your character for the better. You just have to know what you want to become, and want it badly enough to put up a fight whenever the negative traits that get in the way begin to surface.

 

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 08 September 2009 at 1:29pm
 
 
“You should know that the beauty of a person's Islâm lies in his leaving those things that do not concern him. When Allâh(swt) wills evil for a person he puts him through the test of argumentation - when Allâh(swt) wills good for a person he inspires him to do good deeds.
 
If Allâh(swt) takes away your tongue and gives back to you your heart he has been extremely kind to you; but if he takes away from you your heart and gives you back your tongue then know that you are in a serious calamity.
 
~Al-Mutashâbihât fil-Qur’an – Page 11


Edited by a well wisher - 08 September 2009 at 1:30pm
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 09 September 2009 at 4:01pm
 

 
 
Yunus as-Sadafi’ said:

I have never seen a wiser man than ash-Shafi`ee, I was arguing with him one day about an issue and I left him.

One day, he met me, held my hand and said:
 
‘Cannot we be brothers, even if we disagree about something?’

 
The jurist of Samarkand says that the person who does one good deed should be weary of four things
 (imagine what a person who commits a sin should be afraid of!) :

The fear of not being accepted because Allah says:
‘Allah only accepts from those who fear.’ [Maidah: 27]

 
The fear of showing off, for Allah says:
‘They have been instructed to worship Allah sincerely; religion is for him Alone.’ [Bayinah: 5]
The fear of preserving the good deed because Allah says:
‘Whoever brings a good deed shall have ten times its reward.’ [An`am: 160]
The fear of being deserted in performing good deeds, for Allah says:
‘And my guidance cannot come except from Allah, in Him I trust and unto Him I repent’ [Hud: 88]
 
 


Edited by a well wisher - 08 March 2010 at 7:02am
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 10 September 2009 at 4:24pm
 

 
Al-Hasan Al-Basri – may Allah have mercy on him – said:

Faith is not by embellishment or wishful thinking, but it is what settles in the heart and is verified through your actions. Whoever says good but does not do good will have his words compared to his deeds by Allah. Whoever says good and does good will have his words raised by his deeds. This is because Allah ‘Azza wa Jall said:

To Him ascends the good word, and the righteous deed raises it. [Surat Faatir: 10]”

- Ibn Battah in Al-Ibaanah Al-Kubraa 3/120, and Al-Khateeb Al-Baghdaadi in Iqtidaa’ Al-’Ilm Al-’Amal #56.



Edited by a well wisher - 10 September 2009 at 4:24pm
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 11 September 2009 at 4:59pm
 
 
A Principle Regarding The Movement Of The Hearts
 
“…and it is essential to point out a principle regarding the movement of the hearts to Allah so that they become firmly tied to Him, and their blemishes become reduced – or even completely removed – with the Will and Power of Allah.

So, we say:

Know that there are three things that push the hearts towards Allah, and they are love, fear, and hope. The strongest of these three is love, and it is something that is sought after in and of itself, since it is something that is desired both in this world and the next, as opposed to fear, which disappears in the Hereafter. Allah Said: {“No doubt! Verily, as for the awliya’ of Allah, they will not have any fear, nor will they grieve.”} [Yunus; 62] And the whole point of having fear is that it prevents one from deviating from the path he is on. Love puts the slave on the path to his Beloved, and the speed and strength of his journey to Him is in accordance with how strong or weak this love for Him is. At the same time, fear prevents him from deviating from this path to his Beloved, while hope serves as his leader and guide on this path.

So, this is a great principle that every servant must pay close attention to, as he will not attain true servitude without it, and it is an obligation on everyone to serve Allah, and none other than Him.

If it is said that the slave does not always have the love that will push him to seek out his Beloved – in such a case, what can push and move the hearts? In such a case, we say that the hearts can be moved by two things:

Constant remembrance of the Beloved, since constantly remembering Him attaches the heart to Him. Because of this, Allah commanded us to remember Him in abundance. He Said: {“O you who believe! Remember Allah with much remembrance, and glorify His praises in the morning and afternoon.”} [al-Ahzab; 41-42]


Realizing His graces and blessings upon you, as He Said: {“So, remember the graces from Allah so that you may be successful.”} [al-A'raf; 69], and: {“And whatever of blessings and good things you have, they are from Allah.”} [an-Nahl; 53] and: {“…and has completed and perfected His graces upon you, both apparent and hidden…”} [Luqman; 20] and: {“…and if you were to try to count the blessings of Allah, you will never be able to count them.”} [Ibrahim; 34]

So, if the slave remembers what Allah has bestowed upon him, such as laying out the sky and the Earth and the plants and animals that are on it, as well as the inner blessings that He has provided him with, such as faith, etc., this will no doubt serve as a motivating factor.
 
Such is also the case with fear, as the heart is moved and pushed upon discovering the verses containing the threats of punishment, prohibition and discouragement from evil, being taken to account, etc.
 
Such is also the case with hope, as the heart is moved and pushed upon realizing His Generosity, gentleness, and Mercy…”

['Majmu' al-Fatawa'; 1/109-110 Ibn Taymiyyah (ra)]

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 13 September 2009 at 12:56am
 
 
Collected by Ibn ‘Abd al-Barr in ‘Jami’ Bayan al-’Ilm wa Fadlih,’ the chapter titled: ‘The Virtue of Looking Through Books and the Praiseworthiness of Tending to Them’

2414: Abu ‘Abdullah Muhammad bin Isma’il al-Bukhari was asked:

“What is it that strengthens one’s memory?”

He replied: “Constantly looking through books.”

2415: Ahmad bin Abi ‘Imran said:

“I was with Abu Ayyub Ahmad bin Muhammad bin Shuja’, and he was staying in his house. So, he sent one of his sons to Abu ‘Abdillah bin al-A’rabi to invite him over.

The boy returned, saying: “I asked him this, and he said to me: “I am with a group, and when I am done being taught by them, I will be over,” and I did not see a single person at his house. Rather, he had in front of him books that he was looking through. He would look in this book for some time, and then look in another book for some time.”

Shortly thereafter, he arrived. So, Abu Ayyub said to him: “O Abu ‘Abdillah! Glory be to Allah, the Mighty! You stayed behind and prevented us from your presence, and my son said that he did not see anyone with you, and that you said you were with a group, and that you would come as soon as you were done being taught by them!”

So, Ibn al-A’rabi said:

We have company who sit with us and do not bore us

Loyal ones who can be trusted while they are present or away;


They benefit us from their knowledge of what happened in the past

And intelligence, manners, and opinions that are correct;


With no fear of conflicts or bad companionship

 And one does not fear from their tongue or hand;


So, if you say that they are dead: nay! You are a liar

 And if you say they are alive, you are not far from the truth…

2416: It was said to Abi al-’Abbas Ahmad bin Yahya (Tha’lab):

“The people have greatly missed you. If only you could leave your house for just a bit and show yourself to the people so that they could benefit from you, and you could benefit from them.”

So, he stayed silent for an hour, and said:

If we accompanied the kings, they would act arrogantly with us 

 And would belittle the rights of those they were accompanying;


Or if we accompanied the merchants, we would become sorrowful

 And would become mere counters of money;


So, we remained in our homes, extracting knowledge

 And filling with it the stomachs of these pages…

2419: From what was memorized in the past:


What a great speaker and companion the book is! 

 You can seclude yourself with it if your friends bore you;


It does not reveal your secrets, and is not arrogant

And you can gain from it wisdom and uprightness…

2420: Ahmad bin Muhammad bin Ahmad recited to me:

And the sweetest that a youth can desire after piety

 Is knowledge that is beautified for him to seek it;


And for every seeker, there is a pleasure that he desires 

And the pleasure of the scholar is his books…

2421: And he asked me to add to the above, and I immediately followed up with this in his presence:

The book relieves the concerns of its reader 

 And when he reads, his exhaustion disappears;


What a great companion it is if you seclude yourself with it 

 You do not fear it plotting against you, or causing commotion…
2424: Abu ‘Amr bin al-’Ala’ said:
 

“I never entered upon a man or passed by his door – seeing him with a book in his hand, and his companion doing nothing – except that I judged him to be the more intelligent one.”

2425: ‘Abdullah bin ‘Abd al-’Aziz bin ‘Umar bin ‘Abd al-’Aziz said:

“I never saw a better admonisher than the grave, or anything more satisfying than a book, or anything safer than lack of socialization.”

2426: al-Hasan al-Lu’lu’i said:

“Forty years of my life have passed in which I never awoke or went to sleep except that a book was resting on my chest.”

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 13 September 2009 at 6:00pm
 
 
 
 
Tests Of Moral Character

Salman ibn Fahd al-'Awdah

 

Moral integrity and upright conduct are held in high esteem by all people and all religions. They are a fundamental part of the Message of all the Prophets (peace be upon him), so much so that the last of the Prophets – Muhammad (peace be upon him) – said: “I was only sent to perfect good moral character.”

There is no need to speak at lengths on this point, since it is something about which all people agree. You find that even those who campaign against moral character and act immorally and unscrupulously invariably speak highly of moral character and admit to its virtue.

A person might adopt good manners under certain circumstances, simply because they are prevailing or he might do so little by little. Even this is something good. Abű al-Dardâ said – and some narrations have him attribute the words to the Prophet (peace be upon him): “Knowledge is attained only through learning and gentleness is attained only through being gentle. Whoever is intent on attaining goodness will be given it and whoever keeps away from evil will be spared it.” [Târîkh Baghdâd and Târîkh Dimashq]

However, it is not at all praiseworthy for a person to make a show of good character in order to take advantage of others or win them over for some personal benefit or ulterior motive. The true test of a person’s moral fiber is constancy. This is why the old Arabic saying goes: “You see the true character of men when you travel with them.”

A person’s true character shows forth when he is at home in how he deals with his wife through the long years, in hardship and ease, when things are going well and when things go wrong. This is where has to hold himself together and where his patience is tested. His ability to keep clear of vanities, to remain clement and tolerant, and to exhibit good conduct are all tested by his married life and his family life.

The same can be said regarding friendships when a person is constant and sincere regardless of the changing circumstances. How often does a person see his friend as the one who he can rely on in need, only to find that “friend” adds to his hardships when that time of need arrives?

May the lives of those who are faithful and sincere be beautiful and blessed, those who resolve within themselves not to be fickle when circumstances change and not to turn their backs in times of misfortune. How rare such people are.

Long acquaintance and association reveal how substantial or superficial a person’s moral character really is.

There is another important test of moral character that shows how true or false a person’s morals are, and that is the test of power. A person who is weak might exhibit good moral conduct and a present a passive, subdued disposition. He does not do so because it is part of his nature, but simply because he does not have the power to behave any other way.

The Arabic poet al-Mutanabbî said:

Oppression is human nature, so if you find
Someone abstain from it, there is some reason why.


Perhaps al-Mutanabbî borrowed these words from Aristotle who said: “Oppression is part of human nature. Only one of two reasons withholds people form it: religiousness or fear or reprisal.”

When a person is in a position of strength, then his true moral character shows forth. If a person who attains power, wealth, or prestige continues to uphold his moral values, maintains his affection for others, remains humble, and shows clemency to those who ill treat him, this is a sign of the true nobility of his character and the true goodness of his person.

Alas, how often do we find people who are not corrupted by power, fame, and sudden wealth?

A third test of moral character is disagreement. Most people exhibit good conduct with those who agree with them and share their way of thinking, on account of their common interests. However, when differences arise, whether ideological or material, people tend to expose their true selves.

A person of dignity and good character will remain composed and sensible. He will articulate his disagreements in a clear and precise manner. Moreover, he will be respectful when doing so and avoid accusative, insulting, and offensive language. His moral character will prevent him from conducting himself in a mean and lowly fashion, so he will be able to retain his composure while talking to others, in spite of his disagreement with them. He will not react emotionally in a way that detracts from his character and merely demonstrates his inability to prevail on the strength of his opinion.

Another person, in the same situation, will start cursing and hurling accusations at his opponents, acting as if only he is right and everyone else is by necessity wrong. His misplaced anger will destroy the edifice of his good character. He may go so far to concoct lies and make false claims. He might resort to deceptive arguments to make his opponents stumble and deliberately take the words of others out of context.

People like to say that disagreements do not spoil their interpersonal relationships and it is good that they say so, but what really counts is how they conduct themselves in actual practice, not just in theory. I have observed many young, religious people in their disagreements amongst themselves, and have encountered them applying to one another statements so horrid and injurious that it grieved my heart made my eyes well up with tears. They would call each other idiots, insult each other, and accuse one another of deception, heresy, immorality, and unbelief. I would ask myself: When will these sick disputes come to an end? When will they attain a level of moral character suitable for the community that Allah has chosen and favored? When will they put into practice the values set forth by the Qur’ân and Sunnah that teach us how to deal with others, even our enemies, in a decent manner? “And do not let the hatred of others to you make you swerve to wrong and depart from justice. Be just. That is nearer to piety.” [Sűrah al-Mâ’idah: 8]

When will we come to realize that sometimes our motives stem from our own temperaments and emotions, though we might mistake them for religious conviction?

Then I would turn my attention to some writers who were regarded as being educated and intellectual, and not just part of the common folk. However, I found them to be the same, if not worse in their double standards and their shamelessness.

There are aggressive, predatory tendencies and feelings of enmity latent in the hearts of people, lurking in wait. Sometimes, with the mere appearance of a disagreement in ideology or politics, outward appearances of civility are often cast aside and people fall upon one another with the greatest possible ferocity.

When will we learn to preserve our amicable relationships with others when we disagree? When will we keep up the level of decorum that we want people to see from us? When will our moral values and principles translate from theory into a practical way of life, into something that endures throughout our lives and throughout our relationships, no matter how long they last? They must be values that stay with us even if we become powerful or attain to high administrative office, or a prominent media spot, or social prestige, or success in business. They must endure even when we disagree with one another, so we do not have to be always faced with the choice of either destroying our relationships or remaining silent whenever we disagree or see someone making a mistake.

Frankly, though I write all this, I do so with a pen that is hesitant and slow. It is as if it turning to me and asking: “Do you really live up to all of this?” I have to reply: “No, but I promise you that I will try to live up to it, and no matter how often I might stumble, I will keep trying…”

From www.islamtoday.com

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 14 September 2009 at 4:49pm
 

 

"By Allaah! Whenever I endure any adversity I gain four blessings of Allaah in exchange. The first of them is, when the adversity is not caused by my sin (virtue is earned). The second, when the adversity is not greater than my sin (virtue is earned). The third, when I am not deprived of contentment (virtue is earned). And the fourth, I hope for virtues thereby." ['Umar - radhiAllaahu 'anhu]

"There are four things with which Allaah is pleased - the external side of them is blessing and the inner side of them is compulsion. It is a blessing to associate with the pious servants (salihoon) of Allaah, but it is a compulsion to follow them (in deeds). It is a blessing to recite the Qur`aan, but it is compulsory to act according to it. It is a blessing to visit a grave, but it is a compulsion to make provisions for it. It is a blessing to take care of the sick, but it is a compulsion to take a lesson from it." ['Umar - radhiAllaahu 'anhu]
 


Edited by a well wisher - 14 September 2009 at 4:50pm
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 15 September 2009 at 4:59pm
 

 
 
 
 
Hasan al-Basri (rahimahullaah):

“I saw a people from the Companions of the Messenger of Allaah (sallallaahu `alayhi wa sallam) saying:


‘Whoever acts without knowledge, then that which he corrupts and ruins is greater than that which he sets aright. The one who does deeds without ‘ilm is like a traveller without a path, so seek knowledge with such a seeking that does not harm ‘ibaadah (worship) and seek (to perform) ‘ibaadah such that it does not harm ‘ilm.

And a man from amongst them would seek knowledge until it was readily seen from his khushoo’ (humbleness), his zuhd (asceticism), his speech and sight.”

[Siyar A’laam al-Nubalaa]

The link between ‘ilm and ‘ibaadah is one that we must all pay close attention to. If our knowledge is not adding to the quality and quantity of our ‘ibaadah, then it should be a cause for concern because the first benefit we receive from ‘ilm is evident in our ‘ibadah.

We ask Allaah swt for tawfeeq and tafaqquh (understanding)Aameen



Edited by a well wisher - 15 September 2009 at 4:59pm
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 16 September 2009 at 11:52pm
 
 
Calling Upon Allah with Our Words & Deeds
|Sheikh Salman al-Oadah|
 
 
I once saw a man get angry with a merchant. He turned himself to face the direction of prayer, raised his hands to the sky, and shouted out all of Allah's names in a single angry breath. I was amazed at how well he had memorized this noble list of names. I was equally amazed at his ignorance and the mean-spirited conduct that caused him to mention these names in such an unseemly manner, invoking them in supplication against his brother. How could he rush to angrily invoke those names in a rant at the first inkling of disagreement with someone else? He did not even have time to determine which of two of them was truly in the wrong.

He gave a new meaning to taking Allah's name in vain.

When we beseech Allah by His names, we should do so with dignity, composure, and understanding.

There are two ways that we call upon Allah. The first is to beseech him with our petitions, to entreat him with the concerns we have about our worldly lives and our hopes for the Hereafter. This is what we usually understand by supplication (du`â).

The second way we call upon Allah is through our devotions. We do so by invoking His names in our remembrances, by meditating upon the meanings and significance of those names. We do so by praising Him and glorifying Him as His noble attributes warrant through devotion in our prayers, our remembrances, and in our God-consciousness.

Ibn al-Qayyim observes: "Allah is Knowing and He loves those who have knowledge. He is Beautiful and He loves beauty. He is Merciful, and He loves those who show mercy. He is Kind and He loves those who show kindness to others."

When we take to ourselves something of the light of Allah's beautiful names by learning what they mean and developing ourselves and our temperaments accordingly, then we have truly comprehended His names.

I recall reading, in a book by al-Ghazzî entitled A Good Reminder, a hadîth which reads: "Inculcate in your character Allah's good manners."

Now, this hadîth is not authentic, as explained by al-Albânî in al-Silsilah al-Da`îfah (2822). However, as a statement – as a word of advice – its meaning is a good one.

It is as Ibn al-Qayyim explains, that Allah is Oft-Pardoning and He loves to pardon. Therefore, He rewards and blesses those of us who pardon their fellow human beings. He is Generous and loves for us to be generous as well. He is the Concealer of Faults, and He loves it for us to conceal the faults of those who might have wronged us. He is Merciful, and He shows His mercy especially to those of us who are merciful to others.

One way that we call upon Allah's names through our devotions is by reading the Qur'ân. This is because the Qur'ân is full of the mention of His names. We also do so when we call up their meanings in our minds so that they become a constant part of our lives. In this way, we become more fully reliant upon Allah, more penitent, more mindful of our conduct, and stronger in faith. These are all ways in which we bring Allah's names to full realization in our lives.


Edited by a well wisher - 16 September 2009 at 11:53pm
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 18 September 2009 at 12:02am
 

 
Ibn `Ata'llah Iskandarani (rahimahullaah) wrote in his hikam:


Do not leave the remembrance because of your lack of presence of heart with Allah therein, because your heedlessness of the remembrance of Allah is more harmful than your heedlessness during the remembrance of Allah. It may well be that He take you from remembrance in which there is heedlessness (ghaflah) to remembrance in which there is consciousness (yaqadhah); and from remembrance in which there is consciousness to remembrance in which there is presence of heart (hudoor); and from remembrance in which there is presence of heart to remembrance in which there is obliviousness to all but the One Remembered, “And that is not difficult for Allah.”



Edited by a well wisher - 18 September 2009 at 12:03am
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 18 September 2009 at 5:23pm
 
 
 
 
Ibn al-Jawzi(ra) said:
 
“Something was causing me a great deal of grief and distress, and I started to think long and hard about how to get out of this situation by any means, but I could not find any way out. then I came across this verse:
 
‘…And whosoever fears Allah and keeps his duty to Him, He will make a way for him to get out [of every difficulty].’ (65:2)
 
I realised that Taqwa (piety, fearing Allah) is the way out of every kind of grief and distress. As soon as I followed the path of taqwa, I found the way out.”
 


Edited by a well wisher - 18 September 2009 at 5:37pm
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