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a well wisher  
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 30 March 2014 at 6:33am

Talisman of Joy - Shaykh Abdal Hakim Murad

 
We often feel the need to 'get away from it all', an impulse which seems to reflect a strange paradox of modern society. On the one hand, we can be overwhelmed by the hustle and bustle of daily life, always part of a busy crowd. Yet at the same time, are we truly connected to what is around us? Or are we somehow cut off from a genuine relationship with our environment and fellow human beings, always 'alone in the crowd'? The sheikh reflects on the spiritual importance of solitude, and discusses how to cultivate the inner sense of stillness and realisation it can bring. But he also reminds us that this cannot be achieved at the cost of actually cutting ourselves off from society. Rather it should be enhanced by channelling it to transform our relationships with those around us, following the incomparable example of the Prophet Muhammad (peace and blessings be upon him) whose mission began in the solitude of the Cave of Hira but which continued in the upliftment of his people and all of mankind.

From the full lecture titled, "Society & Solitude":
http://www.cambridgekhutbasetc.blogsp...
 
 
 
 
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 02 April 2014 at 2:16pm

Birth, growth, maturity, decay, and death: these are the cycles we see around us, and these are our own reality.

Dunya is change; things either grow or decay. Such is the nature of the spiritual world; the heart's either growing with iman or decaying.

Spring is here gently reminding those willing to listen: ‘Come back, come back, a thousand times come back.’
 
 
~Sh.Hamza Yusuf~
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 23 April 2014 at 4:32pm






According to a beautiful hadith, the Prophet ﷺ said that on the Last Day, when the last two souls are brought forth before God, they are both condemned to hell. As the angels escort them to their final fiery abode, one of them wistfully looks back. Thereupon, God commands the angels to bring him back and asks the man why he turned back. The man replies, “I was expecting something else from you.”
God responds, commanding the angels, “Take him to My Garden.”




It is our expectation of God that determines where we are. This points up the need for thinking well not only of God but also of God’s creation, despite the fact that we are all messy, imperfect works in progress, struggling along in this journey.


~Shaykh Hamza Yusuf~



Edited by a well wisher - 30 August 2014 at 4:18pm
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 20 May 2014 at 3:57am

The Journey of the Heart:

Combating Spiritual Diseases of the Heart

Many humans, Muslims even, live their entire lives with hearts that are very sick at the spiritual level, and many of these hearts eventually die, though physically they may continue to beat for decades.

Islamic scholarship is rich with descriptions of the spiritual diseases of the heart—their various types, how to diagnose them in ourselves and how to remedy them.

As mentioned in this series of articles, the heart is the vessel by which we know God, love Him, and seek closeness to Him—that is the purpose for which it was created. If it is unable to fulfill this purpose, then by definition, it is sick...

http://www.onislam.net/english/reading-islam/living-islam/growing-in-faith/472599-combating-spiritual-diseases-of-the-heart.html


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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 23 May 2014 at 5:55pm





A heart that is pleased, busied and impatient with notions of ‘more’ or ‘less,’ is not a heart but a stomach.



~Hazrat Mir Ghotbeddin Mohammad~
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 02 July 2014 at 3:18am

The Journey of the Heart:

On the Journey to Allah, Beware of Three ...

The Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) warned us of three destructive qualities that can cause our hearts to deviate from their spiritual journey to Allah. In fact, these qualities are so dangerous, so noxious, that they can prevent us from undertaking the journey at all. He said:

"Three are destructive: an obeyed stinginess, a desire that is followed, and a person who is pleased with himself.” (Ibn Majah, 4014)

At first glance, we might overlook the severity of these qualities, thinking, “Those don’t sound so bad.” However, the destruction they cause to the heart is like the destruction a tornado causes when it touches down on land: not only do they harm the people who harbor them but they can cause the demise of an entire community.

What’s perhaps most concerning is that sometimes qualities can be very difficult to detect by the individual who harbors them. Much introspection and reflection is required on our parts to make sure our hearts are purified from such vices...

http://www.onislam.net/english/reading-islam/living-islam/growing-in-faith/474199-on-the-journey-to-allah-beware-of-three.html


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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 17 August 2014 at 3:11pm



Seek scholars that take you from:

1. Doubt to certainty
2. Ostentation to sincerity
3. Desire of the world to detachment of the world
4. Arrogance to humility
5. Animosity towards others to sincere goodness for others.


Translation of Imam al-Ghazali's Ihyā' 'Ulūm ad-Dīn, Kitāb al-'Ilm
 (The Book of Knowledge)

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 20 August 2014 at 11:40pm
Smart Ways for Training Your Heart

There are a lot of successful people who have forged habits out of what makes them successful, and who have learned to love the very things which are the keys to their prosperity.

In this way, they manage to take control of every aspect of their lives, all the way down to the details of when they eat, drink, sleep and bathe.

Even though Allah says: {Know that Allah comes between a person and their heart.} (8: 24); nevertheless He still calls upon us to believe in Him and develop our faith.

Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) said, speaking about matters of the heart:

“O Allah! This is how I divide up what I control, so do not rebuke me for what is outside of my control.” (At-Tirmidhi, 1140)


http://www.onislam.net/english/reading-islam/living-islam/growing-in-faith/476351-smart-ways-for-training-your-heart.html
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 30 August 2014 at 4:04pm





"The martial arts first teach students how to fall because they will inevitably be knocked down. They must learn to do so without irreparable injury. We need to learn to fall without breaking, with grace, with humility and with gratitude for what we find “down there.” We discover our own poverty, our own fallibility, our own desperate need for God’s grace, and in the process, a new found compassion for the flaws of others.

 Never look at someone’s fall and think “never me.” If they fall different from you know that it was not your strength or smarts, but God’s infinite protection that spared you their sin. So when you fall, learn to fall with dignity, never into despair. Our deen began with a graceful fall. Adam’s wasn’t a fall into darkness. It opened forgiveness, humility and return. This is how a believer should fall."


~Dalia Mogahed~



"If, as Islam asserts, the human heart reflects the Names and Attributes of God, then this little vessel of clay must break into many pieces unless held together by Him Who has chosen it as His mirror."

~Charles Le Gai Eaton (ra)~

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 31 August 2014 at 3:56pm







Be whole. And learn to accept people in wholes. As parents, we need to stop teaching our kids that being imperfect makes us bad people. Learning this, we spend our lives trying to pretend we're perfect, living fake, fractured lives, terrified to make or admit a mistake, lest we get written off as unworthy.


As teachers, we need to stop telling people that only "bad people" and "bad Muslims" commit sins. And that to be a "good Muslim", you must be perfect and sinless. This thinking is so dangerous and a powerful weapon of shaytan. It leads to temporary arrogance, and eventual despair (when we inevitably do mess up).

A "good Muslim" is someone who never stops trying to be better, who repents, who doesn't lose hope because that hope is in something infinite (Allah's mercy), not in something finite (our deeds)...


~Yasmin Mogahed~
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 07 September 2014 at 4:06am

Dr.Maher Hathout | The Perils of Anger

http://vimeo.com/51781509



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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 02 October 2014 at 2:54am







When we visit the House, we are therefore invited to remember the Great Covenant: that forgotten moment when we committed ourselves to our Maker, acknowleding Him as the source of our being. The Black Stone itself is, according to a hadith which Imam Tirmidhi declares to be sound, ‘yaqutatun min yawaqit al-janna’ - a gemstone from Paradise itself.

The Ka‘ba functions, in the imagination of those who visit it on Hajj, or turn towards it in Salat, as the centre and point of origin of all diverse things on earth. It is oriented towards the four cardinal points of the compass. Its blackness recalls the blackness of the night sky, of the heavens, and hence the pure presence of the Creator. Allah tells us that there are signs for us in the heavens and the earth; and recent astronomy affirms that the spiral galaxies are revolving around black holes. A powerful symbol, written into the magnificence of space, of the spiritual vortex which beckons us to spiral into the unknown, where quantum mechanics fail, where time and space are no more.

The yearning for the Ka‘ba which sincere Muslims feel whenever they think of it is therefore not, in fact, a yearning for the building. In itself it is no less part of the created order than anything else in creation. The yearning is, instead, a fragment, a breath of the nostalgia for our point of origin, for that glorious time out of time when we were in our Maker’s presence.

That yearning is the central emotion of Islam. It is of the heart: the heart knows the Ka‘ba’s splendour; the mind cannot understand it: it is, after all, only a cube 12 metres high. Hence Jalal al-Din Rumi says:

‘The intellect declares: The six directions are limits, and there is no way out. 
Love says: There is a way, and I have travelled it many times.’
And later he says:
‘By the time the intellect has found a camel for the hajj, love has circled the Ka‘ba.’
This fundamental emotion of the Islamic religion, which is in fact part of the fitra - the primordial human nature, the state of grace into which we were born - is love, mahabba, a painful desire to return to the beloved. Wa’lladhina amanu ashaddu hubban li’Llah. ‘Those who have faith’, as the Qur'an insists, ‘have the greatest love for God’. (2:165) To know one’s origin is to love it. This nostalgic yearning to return, to circle back to the point of origin, for which the Ka‘ba is no more than the earthly symbol and reminder, is the most common theme in the splendid and subtle poetic tradition of Islam.


Islam is hence the religion of the Alastu bi-rabbikum: ‘Am I not your Lord?’. We follow the Great Covenant, unlike adherents of previous religions who follow lesser, local, ethnic covenants. The Ka‘ba represents our way of centring ourselves directly on the divine presence, the origin of all manifestation. We need to ponder the divine wisdom in this.

Those of us who have lived far from nature, and far from beauty, and far from the saints, often have anger, and darkness, and confusion in our hearts. But this is not the Sunna. The sunna is about detachment, about the confidence that however seemingly black the situation of the world, however great the oppression, no leaf falls without the will of Allah. Ultimately, all is well. The cosmos, and history, are in good hands.

That was the confidence of Rasulullah (s.w.s.). It has to be our confidence as well. There is too much depression among us, which leads either to demoralisation and immorality, or to panic, and meaningless, ugly forms of extremism, which have nothing to do with the serenity and beauty to which the Ka‘ba summons us. But Islam commands wisdom, and balance. It is the middle way. And for us, whatever our situation, it is always available, and can always be put into practice. We are the fortunate umma in today’s world. Fortunate, because unlike Westerners, we are still centred on beauty. In other words, we still know what we are, and what we are called to be.


http://masud.co.uk/ISLAM/ahm/sunnah.htm


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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 07 November 2014 at 3:44pm





“Before God and in conscience, Muslims cannot satisfy themselves by repeating what the texts say and then snap their fingers at daily social realities: that would be to speak of an ideal while at the same time blind themselves as to their daily betrayal.”

       

-Dr. Tariq Ramadan, Islam, the West and the Challenges of Modernity
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 23 January 2015 at 7:06pm


THE DESTITUTE: A DISCUSSION ON THE SPIRITUALITY OF POVERTY | Shaykh Abdal Hakim Murad



http://tune.pk/video/5746950/the-destitute-a-discussion-on-the-spirituality-of-poverty-shaykh-abdal-hakim-murad-ᴴᴰ


Edited by a well wisher - 25 January 2015 at 4:30pm
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