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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote searching Replybullet Posted: 08 March 2011 at 4:29am
Originally posted by Al-Cordoby

I just completed reading Dr. Tariq Ramadan's book on the life of Prophet Muhammad, peace be upon him
 

It's an excellent, highly recommended book to read, and the title is (The Messenger: The Meanings of the Life of Muhammad)

 

Dr. Ramadan gives a comprehensive summary of the main events in the life of the prophet, peace be upon him, while focusing on the gentle character of the prophet and his dealing with Muslims and non-Muslims in the most beautiful way

 

Reading the book was a great experience and once started the book, I could not let go (good job I started it on holiday)

 

Here is a formal review, which may be of interest:

 


<SPAN =TitreBiblio></SPAN> 
<SPAN =TitreBiblio>

Here is a fresh and perceptive look at Muhammad, capturing a life that was often eventful, gripping, and highly charged. Ramadan provides both an intimate portrait of a man who was shy, kind, but determined, as well as a dramatic chronicle of a leader who launched a great religion and inspired a vast empire. More important, Ramadan presents the main events of the Prophet’s life in a way that highlights his spiritual and ethical teachings. The book underscores the significance of the Prophet’s example for some of today’s most controversial issues, such as the treatment of the poor, the role of women, Islamic criminal punishments, war, racism, and relations with other religions. Selecting those facts and stories from which we can draw a profound and vivid spiritual picture, the author asks how the Prophet’s life can remain—or become again—an example, a model, and an inspiration. And how can Muslims move from formalism—a fixation on ritual—toward a committed spiritual and social presence?


In this thoughtful and engaging biography, Ramadan offers Muslims a new understanding of Muhammad’s life and he introduces non-Muslims not just to the story of the Prophet, but to the spiritual and ethical riches of Islam.


Released in February 2007 but already sold at the [COLOR=#544995">Toronto Islamic Convention[/COLOR">.


<P =spip>A STARRED REVIEW in <FONT face="Book Antiqua" color=#000080 size=2>Publishers Weekly Review (USA)


<P =spip>In the Footsteps of the Prophet: Lessons from the Life of Muhammad Tariq Ramadan. Oxford, $23 (208p) ISBN 978-0-19-530880-8


<P =spip>London-based Ramadan, the Oxford research fellow who authored Western Muslims and the Future of Islam, is probably best known for being denied entry into the United States, based on alleged violations of the Patriot Act.


This excellent, engaging book ought to turn public attention back toward Ramadan as a writer and a skilled interpreter of Islamic history. In deliberately brief chapters, Ramadan brings Muhammad to life. He highlights Muhammad’s resolute faith in spite of setbacks like poverty and being orphaned, and upholds the prophet as a spiritual hero-bravely compassionate and unusually tolerant of others, including non-Muslims.


Ramadan notes his extraordinary kindness, even to those he battled. For example, a slave who had been given to Muhammad turned down emancipation, saying he preferred service to Muhammad over freedom with anyone else. (Muhammad immediately freed the slave and adopted him as his own son.) Similar tales of mercy lace through Muhammad’s life: In the midst of a battle march, Muhammad advised his troops to be careful not to hurt a litter of puppies on the roadside; on another occasion, Muhammad released prisoners of war because they had taught community children how to read and write.


Ramadan ably demonstrates why Muhammad is a spiritual paragon to the followers of Islam




</SPAN> 


I loved this book. I read another biography of Muhammad (PBUH) by Karen Armstrong. It wad part of the Eminent Lives Series. It was good, but more focused on historical facts. In the Footsteps of the Prophet really attempted to show Muhammad's (PBUH) human side, his vulnerability and strength. His love for all of Allah's creation from plants and animals to human beings. I feel like I have a deeper understanding of the kindness and humanity of Muhammad (PBUH) after reading this book. Highly recommended.
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 23 April 2011 at 7:50am

Quest for Meaning: A Book by Dr. Tariq Ramadan

The Quest for Meaning : A journey in search of serenity and peace

How different do our various religions, philosophies and traditions of thought make us ? And can we see past what divides us to discover what we have in common ?

In The Quest for Meaning, Tariq Ramadan, philosopher and scholar sets out on a journey to answer these questions and find the universal truths we hold in common, no matter how we arrive at them. Attempting to diffuse flashpoints between societies, Ramadan attempts a bold synthesis of religion, from Christianity to Buddhism, between secularists and believers and argues that we urgently need a new philosophy of pluralism in order to coexist peacefully.

Exploring themes of love, respect, tolerance and reason, alongside fundamental issues such as relationships between men and women and the use of the term ‘civilization’, Ramadan argues that there are universally shared beliefs that are arrived at in many traditions of thought.

After having read and reviewed Tariq Ramadan’s The Messenger, A Spiritual Biography of Muhammad, which was simple in language and style, The Quest for Meaning took me quite a long time to read and understand. In this book, the author has set out travelling the paths of the heart, mind and the imaginary.

There has never been more talk of diversity and plurarity than in this era of globalization and modernization and yet, more so than ever before, we seem to be trapped into our identities and differences. The global world is a village, they say… a village of villagers who know nothing of each other. In more senses than one, they do not know who they are and they do not know who they are living with. This situation can only lead to half-hearted, fearful and dormant conflicts rather than a confident celebration of our riches. Edward Said suggested it would lead to ‘the clash of ignorance.’ Tariq Ramadan says it will lead to a ‘conflict of perceptions’.

The quest for meaning is a journey through time and across the world, but it always ends by bringing us back to ourselves. All paths lead us back to ourselves. In his Muqaddimah, which is aptly subtitled An Introduction to History, the mystic and philosopher Ibn Khaldun concludes from his study of history that the evolution and demise of civilizations are cyclical. Human beings, be they believers or atheists, idealists or rationalists, philosophers or scientists are on what Ibn Qayyim called ‘the seekers’ way and it leads us back to ourselves.

Very aptly, Tariq Ramadan says that our emotions imprison us, but spirituality is both an inspiration and a quest for freedom. The lived experience of spirituality demands of the human subject three things that are implicit in all the traditions : the autonomy of the subject (as opposed to dependency on that which affects the subject), the conscious acceptance of responsibility (as opposed to the victim mentality) and a hopeful and constructive attitude (as opposed to despair or defeatism that does not believe in the possibility of change). Spirituality liberates and gives things meaning. It is based upon an initiation into and education in self-awareness, maturation, the acceptance of responsibility and gradual transformations. Jewish, Christian and Muslim mysticisms constantly remind us of the arche-typal stages of this spiritual awakening.

In the quest for meaning, the author has not left out the importance of education ...

http://www.tariqramadan.com/The-Quest-for-Meaning-A-journey-in.html

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 23 September 2011 at 9:00am

Justice and Tolerance in the Qur'an

by Harun Yahya

When we talk about justice, everybody shares essentially the same basic concepts, and these are accepted by the majority of people right away.

This justice will include people from all walks of life, with no discrimination between them. It will allocate resources fairly among people, without taking their race, religion and language into consideration and will aim to create a world in which the superior is the one who is right, not the powerful.

What often distances people from justice is their rejection of it. They may concur in principle, but they reject it when it conflicts with their own interests. Everyone, for instance, spurns bribery and in theory agrees that taking bribes is immoral. However, faced with an attractive offer of a bribe, some people fabricate "justifications" and violate the principles they theoretically agree with.

Similarly, everybody knows and agrees that in finding out the truth and in the establishment of justice, the authenticity of witness statements are of major importance. In courts, however, some people whose evidence is given may readily lie and mislead the jury when their own interests or the interests of someone they love are at stake. These people accept justice in principle, yet see no reason not to violate it when the truth and their personal interests turn out to be at odds. Alternatively, everybody agrees that public resources should be shared equally. However, the recipients of an "aid campaign" may attempt to take a greater share and even tread over others to accomplish that. In this case, too, personal interests supersede justice.

The examples are legion. Yet we ultimately face the very same truth: even if some people believe in the necessity of justice, they may violate it when their interests are at stake. Since some people with such mentalities are in the majority in some societies, justice remains an illusionary concept.

For due administration of justice over the world, a morality which will enable people to set aside their personal benefits for the sake of justice is needed.

This morality is the values of the Qur'an which Allah commands and instructs us with in the Qur'an. That is because the values of the Qur'an command an absolute justice that makes no discrimination between people, that sides only with what is true and just.

http://www.harunyahya.com/justice1.php


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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 29 January 2012 at 12:36am

Introducing Islam to Non-Muslims

Islam: A Profound Insight (Book Review)

Islam: A Profound Insight is an informative book that presents a deeper insight into Islam with modern outlines, analysis, shapes and colors.

Unlike other books on Islam, Islam: A Profound Insight is an illustrated work based on a broad approach elucidating accurate and fundament sides of Islamic belief that succeed to drive the mind to logical conclusions.

With logical and scientific sources and evidence, Islam: A Profound Insight is a thematic summary of a longer work that may help some see Islam in a new light. In his preface Hemaya writes: "This work is the result of a deepened insight into Islam, which was established through the study of Islamic sciences and acquiring knowledge from more than 72 scholars over 17 years."

Throughout the six chapters of the book and through logical and philosophical questions, Hemaya - addressing the mind - has perfectly answered and remarkably illustrated his arguments by quotes of famous western scholars and authentic Islamic sources...

http://www.onislam.net/english/reading-islam/research-studies/reviews-a-interviews/455499-islam-a-profound-insight.html

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote poRTfoxtr Replybullet Posted: 15 March 2012 at 12:41pm
selamu aleykum firends

A book "The Seal of Wisdom" by Muhiyyid'd-din Ibn al-'Arabi  (1) is his magnum opus

brief of Ibn 'Arabi
ibn ‘Arabī was born into a respectable family in Murcia, Taifa of Murcia on the 17th of Ramaḍān 561 AH (27th or 28 July 1165 AD). Muḥyiddin Muḥammad ibn ‘Alī ibn Muḥammad ibn ‘Arabī was widely known as al-Shaykh al-Akbar; in medieval Europe he was called Doctor Maximus.(2)

a part of the book

"All the Divine Names contained in in the divine form4 appear in this human organism. Thus it possesses the rank of containing and integrating this existence. It was by this that Allah set up the proof against the angels,5 so remember that! Allah admonishes you through others. Look at where that originates and where it ends up. The angels did not realise what was implied by the organism of the khalif, nor did they realise what the presence of the Truth demanded as 'ibâda 6 (worship). Each one only knows from Allah what his essence accords him. The angels do not possess the universality of Adam, and they did not understand the Divine Names with which he has been favoured, and by which he praises Allah and proclaims His purity. They only knew that Allah had names whose knowledge had not reached them, so they could not praise Him nor proclaim His purity through them. What we mentioned overcame them and this state overpowered them. They said about this organism, "Why put on it one who will  cause corruption on it?" (2:30) This is only the argument which they were voicing.

What they said regarding Adam is exactly the state they were with regard to Allah. Had it not been that their nature was in accord with it, they would not have said what they said in respect of Adam, "and yet they were not aware." If they had had true recognition of themselves, they would have had knowledge, and had they been in possession of knowledge, they would have been protected and would not have resisted by belittling Adam and thus exceeding their claim of what they possessed of His praise and glorification. Adam was in possession of Divine Names which the angels did not have, so that their praise and glorification of Him was not the same as Adam's praise and glorification of Him. Allah describes this to us so that we may ponder it and learn adab7 with Allah, and so that we will not lay claim to what we have not realised or possessed by pinning down. How can we allege something which is beyond us and of which we have no knowledge? We will only be exposed. This divine instruction is part of AllahÕs discipline of those of His slaves who are well-mannered, trusting and khalifs."


i think this book should be read slowly and carefully cuz it could be misunderstood

"The degree of Necessary Existence is so stable and real, and contingent existence is so insubstantial and pale that many of those who have investigated creation, like Muhyiddin al-Arabi, have reduced the other levels of existence to the level of delusion arid imagination; they said: "There is no existent save Hirn." That is, it must not be said of other things that they have existence in relation to the Necessary Existence. They stated that they are not worthy of the title of existence."(20. Letter, Risale-i Nur)

im reading it nowadays i found it difficult to understand

may it be easy

(1) http://bewley.virtualave.net/fusus.html
or  http://www.ibnularabi.com/ma20.pdf

(2) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ibn_Arabi


Edited by poRTfoxtr - 15 March 2012 at 1:27pm
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 12 December 2012 at 1:58am
Book Trailer: Reclaim Your Heart - By: Yasmin Mogahed

Published on Dec 6, 2012

Many of us live our lives entrapped by the same repeated patterns of heartbreak and disappointment. Often, we have no idea why this happens.

Reclaim Your Heart is about freeing the heart from this slavery. It is about the journey in and out of life's most deceptive traps.

This book was written to awaken the heart and provide a new perspective on love, loss, happiness, and pain. A manual of sorts, Reclaim Your Heart will teach readers how to live in this life without allowing life to own you. It is a manual of how to protect your most prized possession- the heart.

Hard copy now available World Wide -- Please check Book Depository first to see if free international shipping is available in your country! Amazon can ship virtually everywhere! eBook also available below!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cDNN4FpQk7I


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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 12 January 2013 at 3:01am

10 Books Every (English-Speaking) Muslim Should Read

by Imam Sohaib Sultan
Muslim Life Coordinator and Chaplain,
Princeton University

My top 10 list of books that Muslims should read and have in their library.

Obviously this list isn't comprehensive. It's only meant as a conversation starter and to highlight some great books.

The Qur’an (Oxford World’s Classics), M.A. Abdel Haleem
The most accessible translation of the Qur’an to date.

The Story of the Qur’an: Its History and Place in Muslim Life, Ingrid Mattson
 Goes beyond introduction and really explores the role of the Qur’an in shaping Muslim life and society.

Our Master Muhammad. The Messenger of Allah: His Sublime Character and Exalted Attributes, Imam Abdullah Sirajuddin Al-Husayni, Trans. Khalid Williams. (Vol. 1 and 2)
The best portrait of who the Prophet (s) was and how he lived.

Provisions for the Seekers, Abdur-Rahman ibn Yusuf
A beautiful collection of succinct hadith that one can use to live by.

The Spiritual Teachings of the Prophet: Hadith with Commentaries by Saints and Sages of Islam, Tayeb Chouiref
A marvelous exploration of the spiritual gems from our Beloved Messenger (s).

The Book of Assistance, Imam al-Haddad Trans. Mostafa Badawi
Comprehensive guide to living Islam internally and externally.

The Vision of Islam, Sachiko Murata and William C. Chittick
One of the best books to introduce Islam, Iman, and Ihsan.

The Spirit of Islamic Law, Bernard G. Weiss
An excellent book on how Islamic Law developed and evolved over the centuries.

Islam and the Problem of Black Suffering, Sherman A Jackson
Addresses one of the most pressing and difficult theological questions in modern religious discourse.

Islam: The View from the Edge, Richard W. Bulliet
A unique look at Islamic history “from the edge” rather than from the center.

http://muslimchaplain.wordpress.com/2012/12/31/10-books-every-muslim-should-read/
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 24 January 2013 at 5:24am
On-Line e-Book: Muhammad The Wise Leader (peace be upon him)

An easy to read e-book that summarizes in 63 pages the unique leadership skills of Prophet Muhammad, peace be upon him, and his care for his companions and all people he met.

The leadership model of Prophet Muhammad, peace be upon him, is a humane model based on serving and caring for others.

http://www.onislam.net/english/e-books/reading-islam/461024-muhammad-the-wise-leader-pbuh-ebook.html

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 17 July 2013 at 6:30am
On-Line e-Book: Ramadan for New Muslims

Ramadan is the most blessed month of the year.

What does Ramadan mean to Muslims in general and how can a new Muslim benefit from his first Ramadan?

This e-Book will answer all your questions.


http://onislam.net/english/ebooks/reading-islam/463574-ramadan-for-new-muslims-free-ebook.html


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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote ahmadkhan12 Replybullet Posted: 30 May 2014 at 3:58am
May Allah reward your struggle in Islamic way.. 
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 26 February 2015 at 3:54pm
Misquoting Muhammad

The Challenges and Choices of Interpreting the Prophet’s Legacy

-Dr.Jonathan Brown




Named as one of the top books on religion of 2014 by The Independent…! Misquoting Muhammad takes the reader back in time through Islamic civilization and traces how and why such controversies developed, offering an inside view into how key and controversial aspects of Islam took shape. From the protests of the Arab Spring to Istanbul at the fall of the Ottoman Empire, and from the ochre red walls of Delhi’s great mosques to the trade routes of Islam’s Indian Ocean world, Misquoting Muhammad lays out how Muslim intellectuals have sought to balance reason and revelation, weigh science and religion, and negotiate the eternal truths of scripture amid shifting values.


http://www.drjonathanbrown.com/2014/misquoting-muhammad

Quotes from the book...

“Many Americans and Western Europeans proudly trumpet the diversity of cosmopolises like London and New York without realizing that cosmopolitanism does not mean people of different skin colors all sitting around over wine at a bistro table complaining about organized religion. It means people who hold profoundly different, even mutually exclusive, beliefs and cultural norms functioning in a shared space based on toleration of disagreement.”


“Not lightly should you transport aluminum trays of oily Pakistani food in the back of your mother’s car. This is one of many lessons I learned as part of the Muslim Students Association (MSA) in university. Through tragically not reflected in catering, a glorious diversity has generally characterized attendance at MSA events across the varied campuses of North America’s colleges and universities: the second-generation children of Hyderabadi physicians suffering toward medical school themselves, well-heeled scions of Syrian engineers from the Midwest on break from serial brunching, African-American Muslims bemused by immigrant angst, occasional pompously coiffed upper-crust Pakistanis expiating sins incurred while clubbing and the odd Saudi exchange student committed to bringing order to this religious soup.”

― Jonathan A.C. Brown, Misquoting Muhammad: The Challenge and Choices of Interpreting the Prophet's Legacy


La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 01 April 2017 at 2:54am
Review of Revive Your Heart by Nouman Ali Khan

Nouman, in Revive Your Heart, takes short mentions from the Quran and blows them up to poster size so we can see the scene clearly. You think at first, we couldn’t possibly have such a large scope of understanding of such small mentions in the Quran.

But Nouman expertly expounds upon verses, words, and even letters of the Quran that you would never know there is so much depth to...

By highlighting this, Revive Your Heart shows the continuity of human kind in a way that doesn’t make me feel disgusted by the human race (per usual), but instead makes me feel a real connection with all of humanity, as is one of the purposes of the Quran.

He also tackles tough issues through these Quranic stories, issues like our sense of entitlement, how we need to be better communicators, how we treat our daughters, how we can build stronger communities, and more.   

One example of a tough issues this book explains is that of the disease of bigotry in light of the Quran. Nouman explains what the Quran says about how it happens, how (very, very) often we participate in it without even knowing, and how destructive it is. Then he explains what we can and must do about it.

And his solution, no, the Quran’s solution that he explains so well is surprisingly simple. This is a section I would like to read, and recommend all read, over and over...

https://islamwich.com/2017/03/31/review-of-revive-your-heart-by-nouman-ali-khan/


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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 30 April 2017 at 4:03pm

RECOMMENDED READING LIST OF PROFESSOR TIMOTHY J WINTER

Timothy John Winter (born 1960), aka Shaykh Abdul Hakim Murad, is a British Muslim thinker, professor, and translator.

Winter has written about the interaction between Islam and secular issues spanning a wide range of disciplines.

He has held a number of lectureships and administrative posts in British academia having to do with theology, the intellectual history of Islamic civilization, and international academic cooperation…[Read More]

Beginners:

  1. Abdel, Haleem M. A., trans. The Qurʼan (New York: Oxford UP, 2005).
  2. Du Pasquier, Roger. Unveiling Islam (Cambridge: Islamic Texts Society, 1990).
  3. Emre, Yunus. The City of the Heart: Yunus Emre’s Verses of Wisdom and Love. trans. Süha Faiz (Shaftesbury, Dorset: Element, 1992).
  4. al-Haddad, Abdullah. The Book of Assistance (London: Quilliam Press, 1989).
  5. Hammad, Ahmad Zaki. Lasting Prayers of the Quran and the Prophet Muhammad (Bridgeview, IL: Quranic Literacy Institute, 1996).
  6. Hofmann, Murad Wilfried. Islam: the alternative (Reading: Garnet, 1993).
  7. Ibrahim, Izzedien and Denys Johnson-Davies. trans. Forty Hadith (Beirut, 1983).
  8. Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin. Islam and Peace (New Delhi: Goodword, 1999).
  9. Lawrence, Bruce. The Qur’an: a biography (New York, 2007).
  10. Lings, Martin. Muhammad: his biography based on the earliest sources (Cambridge: Islamic Texts Society, 1986).
  11. Maqsood, Ruqaiyyah Waris. The Muslim Marriage Guide (London: Quilliam, 1995).
  12. Masri, Al-Hafiz Basheer Ahmad. Animal Welfare in Islam (3rd ed. Leicester: Islamic Foundation, 2007).
  13. Murad, Abdal Hakim. Muslim Songs of the British Isles, Arranged for Schools (London: Quilliam Press, 2005).
  14. al-Nawawī, Yaḥyā Ibn-Šaraf. Al-Maqasid: Imam Nawawi’s Manual of Islam. trans. Noah H. Keller (Evanston: Sunna Books, 1994). English translation and appendices by Sheikh Noah Ha Mim Keller.
  15. Schleifer, Aliah. Mary the Blessed Virgin of Islam (Cambridge: Islamic Texts Society, 1998).
  16. Shalabi, Abdul Wadod. Islam Religion of Life (London: Quilliam Press, 1990).
  17. Stockton, Peter. Transcending Jerusalem (Stockton, 2008). Web. <http://www.transcendingjerusalem.com>.
  18. Tawfiq, Idris. Gardens of Delight: A Simple Introduction to Islam (London: Stacey International, 2007).
  19. Winter, Tim, and John A. Williams. Understanding Islam and the Muslims: The Muslim Family and Islam and World Peace. (Louiville KY: Fons Vitae, 2002).
  20. Wolfe, Michael. The Hadj: an American’s pilgrimage to Mecca (New York: Atlantic Monthly Press, 1993).
  21. Wolfe, Michael, ed. Taking Back Islam: American Muslims Reclaim their Faith (New York: Rodale, 2002).
  22. Yusuf, Hamza. The Creed of Imam al-Tahawi (Hayward CA: Zaytuna, 2007).

https://splendidpearls.org/2015/03/30/shaykh-abdal-hakim-murads-book-recommendations/


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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 20 August 2017 at 4:28am
Islam — The Straight Path: Islam Interpreted by Muslims

by Kenneth W. Morgan

Kenneth W. Morgan is Professor of history and comparative religions at Colgate University.


Published by The Ronald Press Company, New York 1958.

SUMMARY

(ENTIRE BOOK) A collection of essays written by Islamic leaders for Western readers. Chapters describe Islam’s origin, ideas, movements and beliefs, and its different manifestations in Africa, Turkey, Pakistan, India, China and Indonesia.


Chapters

  • Preface

    The faith of Islam, and the consequences of that faith, are described in this book by devout Muslim scholars. This is not a comparative study, nor an attempt to defend Islam against what Muslims consider to be Western misunderstandings of their religion. It is simply a concise presentation of the history and spread of Islam and of the beliefs and obligations of Muslims as interpreted by outstanding Muslim scholars of our time.

  • Chapter 1: The Origin of Islam by Mohammad Abd Allah Draz

    The straight path of Islam requires submission to the will of God as revealed in the Qur’an, and recognition of Muhammad as the Messenger of God who in his daily life interpreted and exemplified that divine revelation which was given through him. The believer who follows that straight path is a Muslim.

  • Chapter 2: Ideas and Movements in Islamic History, by Shafik Ghorbal

    The author describes the history and problems of the Islamic society from the time of the prophet Mohammad as it matures to modern times. Statistical compilations of the numbers of Muslims in various countries are listed.

  • Chapter 3: Islamic Beliefs and Code of Laws by Mahmud Shaltout

    The author holds that it has been proven that the Qur’an could not possibly be the work of Muhammad or of any other human being, but has been given to the Prophet by Holy Revelation. Of this there is no doubt whatsoever. Thus, the beliefs of Islam are True.

http://www.religion-online.org/book/islam-the-straight-path-islam-interpreted-by-muslims/


(This book triggered the interest of Joe Bradford of Houston to discover Islam)

https://www.joebradford.net/


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