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Al-Cordoby  
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 21 October 2010 at 1:28am

How do you know Allah loves you?

- Allah will make it very difficult for you to commit sins. If you find something bad on TV, you will immediately change the channel. If you hear bad language, you will turn and walk away. If a friend invites you to do something bad, you will find it too difficult to go for your love to Allah (SWT).

- When we pray the five obligatory prayers.

- When we pray the voluntary prayers, God's love to us increases

- Allah will bless you with good religious friends, and you will find yourself moving away from your bad friends until they no longer influence you to do bad things again. You will find that all your friends are pious Muslims.

- As soon as people remember Allah (SWT) and talk of Him, Allah sends the Angels to surround us. This is how much He loves us, for we are in the company of the Angels!

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 06 November 2010 at 4:42pm

Until you seek you cannot find-

That's true, save of the Lover:
 
You cannot see Him, being blind
 
Until you shall discover.
 

In a human being is such a love, a pain, an itch, a desire that, even if he were to possess a hundred thousand worlds he would not rest or find peace. People work variously at all sorts of callings, crafts, and professions, and they learn astrology and medicine, and so forth, but they are not at peace because what they are seeking cannot be found. The beloved is called dilaram (meaning that which gives the heart repose) because the heart finds peace through the beloved. How then can it find peace through anything else? All these other joys and objects of search are like a ladder. The rungs on the ladder are not places to stay but to pass through. The sooner one wakes up and becomes aware, the shorter the long road becomes, and the less one's life is wasted on these "ladder rungs".
 
- Jalaluddin Rumi in Fihi ma fihi
 
 
God created every creature in keeping with the demand of power, but He created Adam and his children in keeping with the demand of love. He created other things in respect of being the Strong, but He created you in respect of being the Friend.
 
Love is a divine quality that correlates with God Himself, who is both beautiful and and majestic, merciful and wrathful, gentle and severe, near and distant. The angels are cut off from God's love because they cannot taste true distance, while the beasts are far from Love because they cannot experience true nearness. Human beings are woven from nearness and distance. All conflicting attributes are brought together within them. Only they can truly love God, within whom all opposites coincide.
Human beings are the crown of God's creation, since they manifest the full range of the divine attributes.

Although the manifestation of Adam's greatness depends upon the outer dimension of his self known as 'clay' (gil), the true locus of his glory lies in the innermost dimension of his self known as 'heart' (dil), for the heart is where God looks and love for Him is born.

...The traces of the lights of the beauty of unqualified Love appear in the mirrors of pious hearts. Human love subsists through God's Love.
 
- W. Chittick quoting and explaining a partial of Ahmad Samani's writing in Rawh al-arwah
 
La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 10 November 2010 at 4:03pm

To Love

 
Why, deep down, do we love? What is the source of love, its meaning, its object? Why do we experience the birth of love one day, and its death another? Why, deep inside us, does our love for our parents and our children endure? How do we love? Why, deep down, do we love?
 
 
Life teaches us to learn, to suffer injury, to get to our feet again, to mature. Life is revelation; and when our hearts and our intelligence turn toward His revelation, we can grasp something of the meaning, the mystery, and the meaning of this mystery. There are many ways to love: The Most Caring One offers us love through the very essence of our nature, and invites us to continue our search for the love of our fellow creatures, for Creation, for His love.
 
 
There are several ways to love: we can love ourselves out of egocentrism or egotism; out of self-obsession to the point of self-importance and arrogance. How natural a love...and how dangerous. To see the world through ourselves alone: to love ourselves as if we alone existed, and, at the core of this mysterious paradox, to love ourselves to the point of oblivion.
 
 
To love our mothers, our fathers, our husbands, our wives, our daughters, our sons and, our senses dulled by habit, learn nothing from our love for them except when accident or absence strike. To become indifferent in the face of familiar presences. Isn’t it a curious paradox? To be blinded by too much seeing. To lose meaning because we are overwhelmed, drowned, carried away by the endless repetition of daily life.
 
 
To observe our friends, our fellow human beings, our world, and to ask of our heart: why you? Why should you be loved? For your appearance? For your qualities? For your tastes? To love as we feel, because we so “genuinely” feel. The fire at first, the ashes when all is done... destroyed by betrayal, by flaws, by wounds inflicted. Love that blinds; separation in the glare of hindsight. Another paradox: the glowing coals that are the warmth of our loves, and the infinite burn of our suffering.
 
 
To learn to love. Such is the message of all spiritual disciplines. We may love to love ourselves, our neighbours, the universe; we may love to move beyond the self, our own and that of our neighbours; our own and that of the universe. In nearness to the Divine we learn that we must seek, initiate ourselves, tear asunder, give new form, break off and renew. To seek out the meaning of our loves; to initiate ourselves into the secrets of hope and not stop when proof of our qualities lies before us; to break down ego and appearance; to give form to the gazing eyes and all they ask for; to make new the light in the heart and in the eyes and, as when we fast, to learn to break the fast the better to begin again. To be two, with ourselves, with God, with you... a gift, a time of testing, a period of hardship, of hoping.
 
 
Near to you or without you. Why do we love? Why do we break apart? Why, indeed? On our journey, we must learn that His love like ours, that our encounters like our separations, are acts of initiation: we can love a parent, a being, his beauty, his qualities; we can love what is and, in the end, know only hurt and suffering. Over and above what exists, we can learn to love the horizon that unites us. To move beyond ourselves for His sake, to seek together the pathway that leads to His light... to love the meaning, the road travelled as much as we love the destination, and our fate. It is constant effort, this jihad of love. To lift up our eyes before us and learn to love, and with that love, find freedom. To move beyond ourselves, to free ourselves from the loves that bind and imprison us: those “ended” loves, sometimes idolatrous, sometimes misleading, and so near to our animal nature. An infinite task, one never to be completed; a task filled with sorrow, with hurt and tears. Here, on this earth, lies one truth: he who truly loves must learn to weep. Life. Love, and life.
 
 
Why, deep down, do we love? Some like to bind themselves in chains, others to set themselves free. A mystery. The Unique One calls out to us, summons us, tells us: “Go on! Love! Move forward, seek out, and pursue your quest. The love that will come to you is not at all what you are seeking. It is an illusion, a prison. The love you seek, the love that you must learn, opens wide to you the door of freedom: alone, by twos, by thousands, it teaches you to say: “It is Him I love” and, in the depths of your heart, feel yourself loved. And then, at that moment, we must lift up our eyes before us, nurture the freedom we have found, and bestow all the love we possess upon those close to us, to the universe, to humanity. As we move on beyond this life, or as we remain. Love and true Life.
 
 
To love, and learn to leave...
 
 
 
 ~Dr Tariq Ramadan

 
La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 24 November 2010 at 2:33pm

Love: An Islamic Perspective

Love is one of the most central attributes of God.

God is described in the Quran as “Wadood”, a superlative term for love which has been translated as “The Affectionate” or “One who is full of loving kindness”...

The centrality of God’s love is not only measured by the frequency of occurrence in the Quran, but also in the manifestations of His love by creating the human in the best mould, commanding the angels to bow down to Adam, ennobling the human and appointing him/her as trustee on earth, creating all that is on earth and in heavens for human benefit, granting humans the freedom to believe in God and obey Him or to reject belief and defy God’s commands. Even for the sinful, the door of repentance is wide-open at any time prior to the time of death.

Love, however is a two-way street. The Quran speaks also about the human duty to reciprocate God’s love by loving God as well and to manifest the seriousness of that love in the form of willing and trusting submission to His will. Such submission is an act of gratefulness; “Shukr”: {And verily We gave Luqman wisdom: ‘Give thanks to God. Whoever gives thanks only for his own sake and whoever is ungrateful, then surely God is Independent, Praised’.} (Luqman 31:12)

There are two elements of God’s love for humanity. The first element is all-embracive and unrestricted even for those who defy God and commit sins. Such love and care is seen in how God still provides them with all their needs and in His acceptance of them with even greater affection when they repent to Him and re-connect with Him. The second element of God’s love is the bliss of greater love resulting from pursuing a virtuous life...

http://www.onislam.net/english/reading-islam/understanding-islam/ethics-and-values/heart-a-soul/449840-love-an-islamic-perspective.html
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 04 December 2010 at 12:34am

God Loves those who do Good to others

Helping those in need, caring for those who are on their own, visiting those who are ill and praying for them, ... are deeds which God loves

He is The Most Merciful, and He loves to see believers being kind and caring towards each other

He forgave a woman for giving water to drink to a thirsty dog, so how would He reward those who feed the hungry and give shelter to those on the street who have no shelter?

He is a Merciful and Kind God, and He loves that we be merciful and kind to each other

A guaranteed path towards God's love

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 15 December 2010 at 7:09am
The Islamic Notion of Mercy

Acquaintances of mine who have participated in recent dialogues between Christian and Muslim theologians, such as those organized by A Common Word, report that one of the biggest misunderstandings shown by Christian theologians is the notion that Islam has little or nothing to say about love.

One of the several reasons for this mistaken view is that the early Orientalists -- those who first studied Islamic thought in the modern West -- imagined that a school of thought known as "Kalam" played the same role in Islam as "theology" does in Christianity. In fact, Kalam has been one of several approaches to knowledge of God, and certainly not the most influential.

Kalam was closely allied with Islamic jurisprudence and typically depicted God as the supreme law-giver. When it mentioned love, it claimed that God loves human beings by issuing commandments, and human beings love God by obeying him. Those who obey go to heaven, and those who disobey go to hell. God deals with human beings strictly in terms of carrots and sticks -- forget about love in any normal meaning of the word.

Despite the fact that more recent scholarship has done a much better job of describing the diverse theological approaches of Islamic thought, this has had relatively little effect on the prejudices that Christian theologians picked up years ago in seminary. Pope John Paul II, with all his remarkable accomplishments, provides a good example. In Crossing the Threshold of Hope, he wrote, "The God of the Koran ... is ultimately a God outside of the world, a God who is only Majesty, never Emmanuel, God-with-us." (his emphasis)

Even a cursory glance at the Quran should lead a reader to wonder why, if God is so majestic, does practically every chapter begin with the formula of consecration: "In the name of God, the All-merciful, the Ever-merciful." In the text itself, divine names and attributes associated with mercy and kindness are far more common than those associated with magnificence and majesty. Many verses say things like, "He is with you wherever you are" (57:4) -- whether before your creation, during your brief stay in this world, or after death. This divine "withness" is tightly bound up with the notion of love and mercy.

The formula of consecration contains the two names "All-merciful" (rahmān) and "Ever-merciful" (rahīm). Both are derived from the word rahma, which is variously translated as mercy, compassion, and benevolence. Rahma is an abstract noun derived from the concrete noun rahim, "womb." Mercy is the mother's attitude toward the fruit of her womb. When God says in the Quran, "My mercy embraces everything" (7:156), this means that God has mercy on the entire universe. Basing themselves on this sort of verse and on the very notion of mercy, some theologians referred to the realm of nature -- that is, the universe in its entirety -- as the divine womb.

The close connection between mercy and motherhood is obvious in many sayings of the Prophet. For example, he said that when God created mercy, he created it in one hundred parts. He kept ninety-nine parts with himself and sent one part into the world. Mothers are devoted to their children and wild animals nurture their young because of this one part. On the day of resurrection, the Prophet added, God will rejoin this one part with the ninety-nine parts -- all for the benefit of those who dwell in the posthumous realms, whether paradise or hell. Among the several points embedded in this saying is the typical stress on tawhīd, the assertion of the uniqueness of the divine reality that is the foundation of Islamic thought: What we experience as mercy, compassion, and love can only be a pale reflection of a tiny fraction of the real thing.

Another account tells us that the Prophet had stopped to rest at a bedouin camp, where a woman with an infant was baking bread over an open fire. The child slipped away and approached the fire, and the mother quickly pulled him back. She turned to the Prophet and said, "Do you not say that God is 'the most merciful of the merciful'?" He replied that he did. She said, "No mother would throw her child into the fire." For a moment the Prophet turned away and wept. Then he said that God puts into hellfire only those who refuse to go anywhere else.

As a divine attribute, mercy is not identical with love, because love demands mutuality: "He loves them, and they love Him" (5:54). In contrast, mercy is one-sided, which is to say that God has mercy on creation, but not the other way around. People must certainly try to be merciful and compassionate, but that means they must love their neighbors as themselves. Failure to do so is a sure recipe for bad karma. As the Quran says repeatedly about those who do not act appropriately, "They are wronging only themselves."

Classical theologians spent a good deal of time explaining the subtle differences between the meanings of "All-merciful" and "Ever-merciful." Commonly they said that the All-merciful mercy is universal and the Ever-merciful mercy is particular.

Universal mercy begins with the bestowal of existence. Nothing has a claim on its own being or its own positive qualities. All are the gifts from the Creator. Everything other than God derives its reality -- however insubstantial that may be -- from the only reality that truly is. Life and livelihood do not come to us by chance, but because of the activity of the All-merciful.

Particular mercy is responsive. Some good things come to us because we seek them out. If you want to become a football player or a physicist, the ambition itself is a gift, and any aptitude you may have is also a gift. But achieving the goal has something to do with your own effort. Every mother will tell you that. If you do not strive for the goal, most likely you will not reach it.

God's particular mercy is his response to human effort. He bestows it on the basis of your engagement, commitment and love. When the Quran says, "God is the friend of those who have faith" (2:257), this means that he has special mercy and love toward those who search him out. Universal mercy reaches people in any case, just as a mother will never stop loving her children. Particular mercy is not guaranteed, because children may refuse to take advantage of their human status.

The goal of love is to overcome separation, to escape from the darkness and pain that define our existential plight, and to enter into the light. Or, it is to take advantage of the universal mercy that embraces everything and to seek out the particular mercy, the path to which is set down in prophetic guidance.

~William C. Chittick, Ph.D.
 
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 26 December 2010 at 12:02pm

Why Do I Love Allah?

I love Him because if I draw near to Him a hand span, He draws near to me an arm’s length, and if I draw near to Him an arm’s length, He draws near to me a fathom’s length. By contrast, I ought to consider my steps carefully before drawing close to humankind. If I love a human being overly, he or she may humiliate me and even grow more averse to me, rather than reciprocate my sincere love.

I do love Him because He is the Eternal, the Everlasting. No matter how deeply my heart becomes attached to Him, there is no fear whatsoever that one day I will be distressed by His death, Glorified be He.

I do love Him Who shows affection to us while He is self-sufficient, rich beyond need, and we stand in need of Him. His door is constantly wide open, whereas the doors of kings are closed, and even if opened, we will be met by so many chamberlains before we can meet a king, if we ever do. As for the Almighty Creator, we can meet Him whenever we like, day and night, through Prayer and supplication. He never gets bored with our frequent invocations. He grants our requests and even rewards us for asking.

My Love Grew When…

My love for the King of kings grew when I read the hadith quoting Him as saying,

“O My servants! Indeed, I have prohibited injustice for Myself and (also) prohibited it amongst you. So, be not unjust to one another” (Muslim).

How far different is the attitude of the earthly kings who make lawful for themselves what they forbid their subjects from...

http://www.onislam.net/english/shariah/refine-your-heart/personal-experience/450289-why-do-i-love-allah.html

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 29 December 2010 at 3:06pm

The Centrality of Love in Islam

 
 
(About 24 mins)



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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 07 January 2011 at 2:52pm
Islam, God and the Shining Light of Love

"God is love," the New Testament teaches, and Muslim theologians would respond, "But of course." The problem is that we are not God. As Jesus said, "Why callest thou me good? There is none good but one, that is, God " (Mark 10:18). There is no authentic love but one, that is, God. This is tawhid, the assertion of divine unity that is the foundation of Islamic thought.

Religious discussions of love sometimes address how it descends from its divine status and intermingles with human affairs. In any case, everyone recognizes its attractive power, even if they disagree as to what it is and where it comes from. Rumi mentions the two extremes of disagreement in the verse,

For the elect, love is a tremendous eternal light,
for the common people, love is form and appetite.

(Divan 18197)

"The elect and the common people" is an expression used in all branches of Islamic learning to distinguish between the experts and the uninformed. For Rumi, the experts are the prophets and saints.

To think that love is "form and appetite" is to imagine that it derives from the realm of sense perception and biological processes. Rumi has nothing against form and appetite, but he sees the distinctiveness of human nature to lie in its openness to the tremendous eternal light.

"Eternal" (qadim) means unchanging. The word is contrasted with "newly arrived" (muhdath), which means dwelling under the sway of time and alteration. God is eternal, and everything other than God -- the universe and all it contains -- fades away. We change, the eternal light stays the same. We have the appearance of reality, but every appearance disappears.

The Quran says that God is "the light of the heavens and the earth" (24:35). The heavens are the high realms of spiritual beings (such as angels and souls), and the earth is the low realm of bodily things. Nothing appears without light. The more intense the light, however, the more difficult it is to see, which explains why the spiritual realm is invisible. No one can imagine the upper limit of physical light, much less that of nonphysical light, which is the consciousness that animates the heavens and the earth.

Spiritual traditions speak of ascending levels of nonphysical illumination, beginning with the obscure sparkles that typify everyday awareness and culminating in the infinite light of the eternal Self. In the Quran's retelling of the story of Moses and the Burning Bush, the light said, "I indeed am God; there is no god but I" (20:14): There is no god but God's very Self, the light of the heavens and the earth.

Rumi's verse, in short, refers to the axiom of tawhid, the fact that there is no true light but the divine light and no true love but the divine love. Everything in heaven and earth is the reverberation of the loving light. Each thing arrives newly and departs just as quickly. In relation to the universe, God is like the moon in relation to flowing water. As Rumi puts it,

The creatures are like water, limpid and pure,
shining therein the attributes of the majestic God...

Ages have passed, and this is a new age.
The moon is the same, but the water is not.
(Mathnawi 6: 3172, 3175)

Our scientific worldview is rooted in the measurable, but love and God are immeasurable. Scientific theories that speak of love naturally tend to agree with Rumi's common people: Love is form and appetite, feeling and emotion, impulses in the brain -- all these can be measured. The Quranic and Biblical worldviews see love as none other than the only reality that truly is. The word "reality," of course, fails to stir the heart, and "love" calls for commitment. Those who answer the call can transform themselves and the world.

Among the many mentions of love in the Quran, the favorite verse of love-theorists is this: "He loves them, and they love Him" (5:54). This verse puts the Islamic worldview in a nutshell: God brought the universe into existence because of his love for human beings. Human beings fulfill their calling by loving God.

The radiance of love's eternal light gives rise to the universe. The goal of love is to overcome separation, to bridge gaps, to bring the two lovers together as one. If love is to do its work, people must recognize the light and love it in return.

"He loves them" brought them into existence. Their recognition of the light feeds "They love Him." Once love intervenes, form and appetite lose their luster.

The final goal of lovers is to join the shining light at its source. The power that works this transformation is love. One of the many Quranic names of God is "friend" (wali), an Arabic word that combines the senses of "lover" and "helper." Both meanings can be seen in the verse, "God is the friend of those who have faith. He brings them out of the darkness into the light" (2:257).


~William C. Chittick, Ph.D.
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The Islamic Notion of Beauty

Anyone with the vaguest knowledge of Islamic culture knows that it has produced extraordinary works of art and architecture -- Persian miniatures, the Taj Mahal, the Alhambra. Few are aware, however, that this rich artistic heritage is firmly rooted in a worldview that highlights love and beauty.

The link between love and beauty is clear. We love what we find beautiful. Beauty attracts, ugliness repels. Nor are beauty and ugliness simply physical characteristics. We all know people who are outwardly attractive but personally repellent, and vice versa.

Beauty makes a massive appearance in love poetry like that of Ibn al-Farid, Rumi, Yunus Emre, and countless others. Their verses stir up wonder and delight by evoking the beautiful characteristics of the beloved.

In explaining the relationship between love and its object, philosophers like Avicenna analyzed the universe in terms of a Necessary Being that combined the attributes of Plato's Good with those of Aristotle's Unmoved Mover. All contingent things, animate or inanimate, are in love with the absolute beauty of the Good and strive to reach it, hence the ceaseless activity that fills the universe.

Those with a more theological bent preferred to cite the saying of the Prophet, "God is beautiful, and He loves beauty." They understood both beauty and love in terms of the axiom of tawhid, "There is no god but God." If God is beautiful, then there is nothing truly beautiful but God. And if God is loving, then no one truly loves but He.

A bit of reflection on God's love for beauty leads to the conclusion that he loves himself before all else. God as the one true lover perceives his own true beauty and loves it eternally. As for the universe, God loves it because, by loving himself, he loves everything demanded by his beauty and mercy, and that includes an infinity of creaturely possibilities. This view was encapsulated in the oft-quoted divine saying, "I was a Hidden Treasure, and I loved to be recognized, so I created the creatures to recognize Me."

In discussions of God's love for the universe, theologians and scholars agreed that God loves both the way things are and the way things ought to be. The discrepancy between these two loves has given rise to the never-ending debate over determinism and free will, nature and nurture, science and values.

God loves the way things are because "He made beautiful everything He created" (Quran 32:7). All things are lovable because they make his beauty manifest. Each thing plays its own harmonious role in the infinite web of relationships that the Quran calls God's "signs." The signs in turn display the characteristics of what it calls God's "most beautiful names."

God loves the way things ought to be because he created human beings with freedom to change themselves. Unique among all things in the universe -- so far as we know -- human beings have the capacity to recognize themselves as works in progress and to intervene in the manner in which they develop. Ghazali and other theologians pointed out that people are "compelled to be free." The expression points precisely to the creative tension between what is and what ought to be.

God's love for all things is often discussed in terms of the universal, all-encompassing mercy designated by the name "All-merciful." His love for the way people ought to be is then tightly bound up with the particular, responsive mercy designated by the name "Ever-merciful." The formula of consecration -- "In the name of God, the All-merciful, the Ever-merciful" -- acknowledges both sorts of love.

To say that God loves all things reiterates the principle of with-ness voiced in the verse, "He is with you wherever you are" (57:4). By means of his all-embracing love and mercy, God tends to the welfare of the universe, including the posthumous realms.

To say that God loves things as they ought to be points to the human capacity to recognize God's with-ness. In order to live their lives in a manner appropriate to the divine presence within themselves, people must be merciful and compassionate. The fact that God is with them does not mean that they are also with him -- that is precisely what needs to be achieved, what "ought to be."

Not being with God opens the door to the ugliness and evil that are apparent to everyone. To ask then how a beautiful God could create a world full of ugliness is to ask why each thing and each person is uniquely itself. From the standpoint of the role that beings and things play in the cosmic harmony, all are beautiful, but some are more beautiful than others, and the scale of beauty stretches not from "one to 10" but from one to infinity.

Whatever the scale we use to judge the discrepancies among things and people, no two fit exactly into the same niche. There is gradation without limit in categories without limit. The lower a thing may be on the scale of beauty, the more it is apt to appear as ugly.

More simply, the world is ugly inasmuch as we perceive it empty of God, the absolute good. It is beautiful inasmuch as we recognize the divine with-ness, the signs of the most beautiful names that fill the universe. Failure to recognize the signs goes back to ignorance -- the "root poison," as Buddhists call it.

Islam has no notion of original sin, but the Quran does say that Adam "forgot" (20:115). Our inherited forgetfulness provides all we need to bungle the job of being what we ought to be.

~William C. Chittick, Ph.D.
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 20 January 2011 at 12:38pm
Feeling the Infinite Love of God

The remembrance of God calms and fortifies the soul. It cultivates fortitude and perseverance, moderates impatience, and repels depression and despair. Remembering God is also very easy. It is accessible to everyone.

There are no prerequisites to fulfill or procedures to follow. There are no permissions to be sought. The doors to God’s remembrance are open at all times, whether we have recently been engaged in worship or have recently committed a sin. We have the opportunity to remember God upon waking, whenever something good happens, when misfortune strikes, when we make a mistake, and whenever else we are given cause to be reminded of our Lord.

It has been my experience that remembering God is the first step in treating all maladies, both physical and spiritual. It is a prescription for every person afflicted with bodily illness or spiritual doubt. It is equally suitable for the young and old, rich and poor, the powerful and the weak, since everyone is equally dependent on God ...

http://www.onislam.net/english/reading-islam/living-islam/growing-in-faith/450688-feeling-the-infinite-love-of-god.html

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 20 January 2011 at 3:32pm
Concepts of Love Used in Islamic Culture
 
Because love is inclined towards the one loved by the heart, it was debated whether or not love should be used for Allah. Although some scholars, not accepting this, said that the purpose of love for Allah was to worship Him, most Islamic scholars brought forth clear evidence for the existence of love of Allah in the Quran and sunnah. It is possible to examine love from various aspects. The Quran painstakingly mentions those who Allah loves. Being a servant Allah loves is the highest and most honorable rank and the most valuable and worthy station and position. Knowing this shows every individual Muslim the path and direction to the qualities he needs to possess and who he needs to love. For this reason, I think it will be more appropriate to touch along general lines on the subject of those who Allah loves:

Allah loves the benevolent (muhsin). Deriving from the ihsan infinitive, the word muhsin, along with its plural, is among the words that pass frequently in the Quran. Ihsan includes goodness and doing good, beauty and beautiful behavior. Also the Prophet defined ihsan as “Serving Allah as if you see Him” (Buhari, “Faith” 37; Muslim, “Faith” 1; Abu Davud, “Sunnah” 16; Tirmizi, “Faith” 4; Ibn Mace, “Preface” 9). Those who spend in Allah’s path in prosperity and poverty, those who swallow their anger, and those who forgive others’ mistakes are the benevolent ones that Allah loves.

  1. Allah loves those who repent and cleanse themselves (Al-Baqara 2/223). The word tawbah (repent) means to return, forego, abandon and separate from. As a religious term tawbah means abandoning sin and returning to right action, abandoning rebellion and returning to obedience, feeling regret for former sins and mistakes, and admitting sins and mistakes.
  2. Allah loves the pious (muttaqi). Taqwa means avoiding something, protecting oneself, and making the ego safe against something feared. In religious custom taqwa means embracing religious commands tightly, avoiding prohibitions, and protecting the nafs (ego, soul) from sin and evil and things leading to these. One who possesses these qualities is called pious. However, it should be mentioned that taqwa is used with many meanings in the Quran. Among these it is possible to see meanings like faith, repentance, abandonment of disobedience, and sincerity. For this reason, many verses of the Quran are related to piety. Taqwa is considered the highest spiritual station a servant can reach in this world.
  3. Allah loves the just (adl). Justice is fulfilling absolute commands and conditions that have been instilled in hearts and minds and been brought forth, without oppression; giving something because it is right, without reproach; and acting according to conscience, not the ego.
  4. Allah loves the patient (those with sabr). Sabr consists of qualities like controlling one’s ego at a moment of calamity; heroism shown in jihad; being able to keep peace in one’s heart during times of difficulty; and being able to control one’s words while speaking.
  5. Allah loves those who trust in Him.
  6. Allah loves those who fight in His path.

 

LOVE / MEVEDDET

Another word that is widely used for love is meveddet. The root of this word comes from the vud infinitive meaning friendship and affection, and loving something and wishing for it. One who loves and has a lot of love is called vud. The purest, most delicate and most refined love is called vud. This word is used with various derivatives in both the Quran and hadiths. The word meveddet has been used in the Quran with the meanings friendship, loyalty, and affection. Allah creates love in the hearts of those who believe and make righteousness; this love is called vud (Al-Maryam 19/96). The Prophet explained the contents of this verse in one of his hadiths: When Allah loves one of His servants, he says to Gabriel: ‘I love such and such a person; you love him/her, too.’ Gabriel loves that person and exclaims to the angels in the heavens: ‘Allah loved such and such a person; you love him/her, too.’ Then the angels love that person. Later, love for that person settles in the hearts of those on earth and spreads among people” (Bukhari, “Unity” 33; Muslim, “Righteousness” 137). The love Allah created between man and wife is also called vud (Rum 30/21).

One of Allah’s beautiful names is Vedud. This name means, from Allah’s point of view, that He is very much loved by His “friends” and is the source of love.  From the servant’s point of view it expresses that Allah has wished goodness for His creatures and loves and gives approval to His pious servants.

La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 03 February 2011 at 4:56am
The Innate Beauty of Human Nature
 
Islamic texts typically begin talk of God's love by citing the Quranic verse, "He loves them" (5:54), which is to say that God loves human beings. God's love is enough to show that people are beautiful, for "God is beautiful and He loves beauty." Human beauty, however, is of two sorts: innate and recovered. It follows that God's love is also of two sorts, corresponding to the two sorts of mercy designated in the formula, "In the name of God, the All-Merciful, the Ever-Merciful."
 
The most beautiful divine names designate positive qualities that appear in creation. Typically numbered at ninety-nine, they include alive, knowing, desiring, powerful, speaking, generous, just, forgiving, compassionate


One of God's most beautiful names is "form-giver" (musawwir). The name means that all shapes, forms, images, ideas, figures, representations, paintings and sculptures are created by God, directly or indirectly.

In speaking of the activity of God as form-giver, the Quran addresses human beings with the verse, "He formed you and made your forms beautiful" (40:64). All created beauty can be nothing but the signs, forms, shapes, and images bestowed by the Form-Giver. In the human case, God formed people "in the most beautiful stature" (95:4). All creatures were given beauty, but only human beings were given the superlative form of beauty. In other words, they alone were created in the form of God himself, who alone is rightly designated by the most beautiful names.

The Quran says that God created Adam as his "vicegerent" (2:30), his representative on earth. In clarifying what this implies, it says, "He taught Adam the names, all of them" (2:31). The stress here -- "all of them" -- indicates that the issue is not simply the names of the natural realm, over which Adam was appointed vicegerent, but also the names of the Creator. Without knowing both sides, Adam could not act as God's intermediary.

Adam was given knowledge and recognition of all that exists as his own actuality. As some of the Quran commentators say, he knew the names of all things in all the languages of all of his descendants. In contrast, his descendants possess comprehensive knowledge only as a potential. It is up to them to bring this knowledge into actuality. The quest to know is an inherent human attribute, and people undertake this quest precisely because of love and desire. They want to know.

God, in his love to be known and recognized, created and continues to create the universe. Human beings, in their love to know, attempt to grasp the reality behind the appearances. In the last analysis, there is nothing truly real but the True Reality. Tawhīd, the assertion of divine unity, provides love with its ultimate focus. Love is then the quest to overcome separation between the knower of the names (us) and the named reality (the One God).


The Islamic approach (not unlike the Christian and Hindu, among others) addresses human nature as a global totality made in the image of the Ultimate Reality. It builds on the primal unity of all things and observes unity's endless reverberations as it emerges from indistinction. Every attempt to determine a thing's coordinates within the infinite sphere of reality must then take into account the center point of the sphere. If that is ignored, people will be talking about some things in relation to other things -- useful, practical, and fascinating, no doubt, but short-sighted.

In this way of looking at things, the One Reality -- the Good, the True, and the Beautiful -- is the source of a good, true, and beautiful universe, which has appeared and continues to appear because of God's love to be known. The quality that separates human beings from everything else is the innate quest to know the Center and rejoin it. This quest appears in the indefinite diversity of human wants and desires, which may or may not be correctly oriented. "Love" is then an appropriate name for the creative force that drives both the originating movement and the quest to return to the Beautiful.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/william-c-chittick-phd/the-innate-beauty-of-huma_b_814576.html


La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 12 March 2011 at 11:29am
Path to Him-Knowledge and Love
 
Dr Tariq Ramadan
 
 
(77 mins)
 

"If you have no beloved,
why do you not seek One.
And if you have attained the Beloved,
why do you not rejoice?"
 
~Maulana Rumi(ra)


Edited by a well wisher - 12 March 2011 at 11:31am
La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah
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