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Al-Cordoby  
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 15 July 2010 at 12:35am
Global Zakat Fund

Zakat can play a significant role in Muslim socio-economic development if it is used properly.

Zakat is mentioned in 82 places in the Holy Qur'an, but millions of Muslims around the world do not realize its importance.
..

http://islamonline.com/news/articles/28/Global_Zakat_fund.html

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 23 July 2010 at 10:46pm
Acknowledging God's Endless Bounties through Alms-Giving
 
Zakah brings the realization that all of one's posses­sions are gifts from God and makes one more keenly aware of the virtues of devotion to God. In the light of such aware­ness, one cannot remain insensitive to the needs of the society in which one lives. Zakah is a perennial reminder that a selfish stance is a wrong stance, and that others must be given their rightful share of our earnings.
 
Zakah gives a clear indication of what one's respon­sibilities to others should be. Everyone is required to recog­nize the rights of others, just as everyone is expected to sympathize with those afflicted by adversity. This feeling should be so well developed that one has no hesitancy about sharing one's possessions with others, or coming to their assistance, even when it is clear that nothing can be ex­pected in return. Even where there are no ties of friend­ship, one should wish others well and guard their honour as if it were one's own.
 
In its external form then, Zakah is an annual tax. But in essence, it is the principle on which God and his creatures have a right to a share in one's property.
 
La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 02 August 2010 at 4:26pm
Social Justice - Inspired by Muhammad

A brief talk by Myriam Francois Cerrah
, a French/British sister convert to Islam, on social justice in Islam

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2meMltKcMr8

(4 minutes)



Edited by Al-Cordoby - 02 August 2010 at 4:28pm
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 05 August 2010 at 2:55pm
Spending for the Sake of Allah

In this episode of the series (In The Shade of Ramadan), brother Khaled reminds us of the great reward of spending in Allah's way, the Almighty, as mentioned in the parable from surat Baqarah (Chapter 2 of the Qur'an)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ByZ2wTc3vfw

(7 minutes)

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 07 September 2010 at 5:06pm
The Essential Teachings of the Third Pillar of Islam-Zakah
 
 
A consistent, reasonable and fair distribution of zakât would require us to know the specific situation of the people, the country’s legislations in social matters, the country’s systems of allocation and benefit and what are the rights (as to qualifying for benefits) of the poor and/or marginalised people, the abandoned women on their own, the unemployed, etc. The zakât’s distribution must be part of a comprehensive action plan that takes into account all the means provided by a specific society to move people from a state of dependence on assistance towards a state of autonomy. Thus, it is necessary to gather the ulamâ’ and specialists (of the national legislations and institutions), social workers and people working at the grassroots, in order to get a more holistic and explicit vision of the strategies to adopt according to the diverse social contexts. It is in fact by taking into account all that a specific society offers as to social policies, taxes and benefits that the zakât’s distribution meets its requirements: thus zakât can be presented and understood as a process towards financial autonomy. For some individuals, zakât can be a kind of a unique support within a transitory situation, for others it can represent part, or the whole, of a necessary capital intended to launch a small/local economic project; for others it would be a conditioned gift toward a specific agreed upon achievements, etc. The options are multiple but require a good knowledge of Islam (as far as the use of zakât is concerned) and of the national legislations as well as of the social realities and conditions at the local and national levels. All the options require in fact specialisation and creativity. One sees no such thing today and zakât in the mind of the great majority of Muslims has become a simple alms for assisting people and no longer what it was meant to be: a demanding tool serving an articulated philosophy of a comprehensive social policy. Not only the distortion is grave but it often appears that the current uses are deeply counter-productive.
 
 
A reflection on the third pillar of Islam shows us how far we are from meeting even bare minimum demands of a profound and intelligent practice of Islam. We respect the forms...less and less the content. It remains that one day, in a Life beyond this life, our neighbours, our poor people, the marginalised, the unemployed, the abandoned women with no income, our drug addicts, our delinquents will ask the Unique the unique question that matters: in the name of what faith have we been full of passive emotions for the oppressed around the world and so empty of respectful and active intelligence and attention for those who lived closest to us, in our neighbourhood, and who we did not see?
 
 It is indeed the only question that matters while one remembers that our Prophet (PBUH) never ceased to ask the Most Close to offer him “the richness of the heart” and “love for the poor people”. One must start from here: to learn again how to love, to learn again how to love the deprived people. Then one shall realize that to love them and to treat them as they deserve is very demanding and not so easy...when they are at our doorsteps. Are not this love and this respect the true and permanent jihad of the contemporary Muslim heart, mind and soul?
 
 
La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 14 January 2011 at 2:03am

The Wisdom Behind Zakah (Alms Giving)

New Muslims are well-versed with the Shahadah, since the testimonial of faith is what affirms their beliefs in Islam and are generally familiar with the five daily prayers, since there is a strong direction to perform them upon becoming a Muslim.

The Zakah, however, can get lost in translation, as it is not simply “giving money to the poor.” The Zakah is a comprehensive taxation system that encourages the redistribution of wealth to those who are in need, in accordance to the Quran’s classifications of who falls within these categories.

Zakah is not recognised as a charity, which is calculated over and above what is obligated upon a person to pay, and neither should it be regarded as a burden, much like conventional taxes are seen as a financial obligation that sometimes becomes a hardship....

Believing in the Wisdom behind Zakah

Like any other form of worship, making a Zakah payment becomes a pleasure for a believing Muslim as the intention to pay it and to reap the blessings in doing so surpass the importance of materialistic wealth to survive the challenges of the world.

Zakah cleanses the heart, purifies the mind and soul and reaches out to much needing Muslims, who in turn become stronger believers through the special bond between one Muslim and another and with God. All this is done with the conviction that God’s direction on alms holds strong and is an obligation upon every able Muslim as it is the third pillar of Islam.

http://www.onislam.net/english/reading-islam/understanding-islam/worship/zakah-and-charity/450543-the-wisdom-behind-alms-giving-zakat.html

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 05 March 2011 at 11:46am

Social Solidarity & Social Justice in Islam

Zakah: The Third Pillar of Islam

Zakah (obligatory charity) is the third pillar of Islam, which was ordained by God to achieve social justice in society. The rich give the poor voluntarily because it is the poor's due on them. ...

Zakah has a deep humanitarian and social aspect. It prevents the concentration of wealth in the hands of few people. It is a call for solidarity among Muslims, and it also purifies one's soul and encourages a Muslim to thank God for His many bounties ...

http://www.onislam.net/english/reading-islam/understanding-islam/islam-and-the-world/worldview/451332-social-solidarity-a-social-justice-in-islam.html

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 17 April 2011 at 1:15am

Purifying Wealth

Zakah is a portion of one’s wealth that must be given to the poor or to other specified causes.

The word “zakah” comes from the verb meaning to purify or cleanse. It is the third Pillar of Islam and is obligatory for all those who are financially able.  

Zakah means the giving of a specific share of one’s wealth and savings to persons or causes that Allah (God) mentions in the Qur’an.

The normal share to be paid is two and a half percent of one’s saved earnings. This applies to cash, bank savings and jewelry. The rate for cattle and agricultural produce is different. The Qur’an mentions zakah, together with salah (ritual Prayer), as a form of worship; and in that respect it differs from ordinary charity, which is optional, and from tax, which a government imposes from time to time at variable rates and for various uses.

The money from zakah can be used only for specific purposes under fixed headings - like helping the poor, the needy, to pay the salaries of those collecting it, to free captives and debtors, for travelers in need, to win over hearts and for the cause of Allah (God) (Qur’an 9: 60) 

The payment of zakah is a way of purifying one’s wealth. It saves one from greed and selfishness and encourages him to be truthful and God-fearing in his financial dealings.

Another purpose is to help the poor and the needy and to assist other causes in the way of Allah (God). Muslims know that it is a profitable investment (and not a loss) to help the cause of Allah (God) because it will establish economic balance and social justice, and at the same time earn an immense reward in the Hereafter ...

http://www.onislam.net/english/reading-islam/understanding-islam/worship/zakah-and-charity/435510.html

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 29 May 2011 at 5:01pm

Solidarity in a Muslim Community

Importance of Zakah in Islam

The Holy Quran has explicitly stated that there is a portion of the property of the rich that should be given to the poor and needy. Allah (SWT) says: {And those in whose wealth is a recognized right. For the (needy) who asks and him who is prevented (for some reason from asking)} (Al-Maarij 70:24-25). The Divine Legislator has fixed that portion Himself and had not left the matter for the generosity of the rich or the openhandedness of the benevolent. He has not left the matter for the feeling of mercy that may exist in the hearts of the rich or their desire for piety and benevolence and their love of philanthropy.

Those needy people have been defined by the Quranic verse: {Alms are for the poor and the needy, and those employed to administer the (funds); for those whose hearts have been (recently) reconciled (to Truth); for those in bondage and in debt; in the cause of Allah, and for the wayfarer: (thus is it) ordained by Allah, and Allah is full of knowledge and wisdom} (At-Tawbah 9:60).

Thus, Zakah (almsgiving) is highly important as regards to its covering of almost all members of the society and on the basis that Zakah is seen as the first source of exemplifying the concept of solidarity and cooperation. Zakah is the third of the five pillars of Islam. One’s Islam is not accepted without Zakah. Zakah purifies and sanctifies the almsgiver’s self, as Zakah benefits the one who performs it before the Zakah recipient. Allah (SWT) says: {Of their goods, take alms, that so thou mightest purify and sanctify them} (Al-Tawbah, 9:103). Undoubtedly, as almsgiving purifies its performer from stinginess and avarice, almsgiving also removes grudge, rancor and hatred of the rich and the wealthy from the hearts of the needy, the poor and those who deserve almsgiving. Zakah creates an atmosphere of love, cooperation and mutual compassion between members of the society where such a great merit is performed.             

Islam permits those charged with authority among the Muslims to take from the money of the rich what they deem enough to cover the needs of the poor - each one according to his financial capability. It is not permitted in a Muslim community that some people sleep with full stomachs whereas their neighbors are hungry. The whole society is commanded to cooperatively share the minimum necessary to support life. The Prophet says:

“The one who sleeps with a full stomach knowing that his neighbor is hungry doesn't believe in me” (Al-Hakim).

In this area, Imam Ibn Hazm said: “The rich people of every region are instructed to help their poor people and the sultan (ruler) forces them to do so. Therefore, the poor and needy should get food necessary for life, clothing for winter and summer and dwellings to protect them from rain, summer, sun and looks of passersby...

http://www.onislam.net/english/reading-islam/living-islam/islam-day-to-day/society/452442-solidarity-in-the-muslim-community.html

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 13 June 2011 at 2:25pm
The Importance of Zakah

Zakat is one of the major religious duties in Islam. Literally, zakah means to "purify". It refers to the purification of a Muslim's wealth and soul.

Wealth purification denotes the mobilization of assets for the purpose of financial growth and justified distribution. Purification of the soul implies freedom from hatred, jealousy, selfishness, uneasiness and greed.

Other Qur'anic connotations include the purification of sin. Technically, zakah is a fixed proportion collected from the surplus wealth and earnings of a Muslim. It is then distributed to prescribed beneficiaries and for the welfare as well as the infrastructure of a Muslim society in general. This contribution is made payable by a Muslim once in every lunar year (Islamic Calendar/Hijri).

Zakah is paid on the net balance after a Muslim has spent on basic necessities, family expenses, due credits, donations and taxes. Every Muslim male or female who at the end of the Hijri year is in possession of the equivalent of 85 grams of gold or more in cash or articles of trade, must pay his or her zakah at the minimum rate of 2.5%.

Zakah has a deep humanitarian and social-political value. This religious act prevents the hoarding of wealth and advocates solidarity amongst Muslims because excessive wealth is distributed amongst the poor. The paying of zakah also helps purify one's soul and encourages a Muslim to have gratitude towards God's bounties.


http://www.islamic-world.net/economics/zakah.htm

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 02 August 2011 at 11:14pm
Divine Purposes in Spending in God's Way

One of the most important acts of worship that cleanses material and spiritual dirt, and enables man to discipline his souls and thus to attain a state of high morality that God would be pleased with, is to spend in God's way for benevolent causes...

Man needs very little to live in this world. Property that is in excess of one's needs is surplus goods. What is important is not the amount given but whether one sincerely gives away what he can really afford. God has knowledge of all things and He has left it to man's conscience to decide the things he actually does not need.

Giving away is a very easy form of worship for those who are not seized by worldly ambitions and who have not sold out to this world, but yearn for the hereafter. God has ordered us to give away out of our wealth to avoid attachment to this world. This is a means to purify ourselves of greed...


http://www.onislam.net/english/reading-islam/understanding-islam/worship/zakah-and-charity/453201-divine-purposes-in-spending-in-gods-way.html

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 09 August 2011 at 12:32am
Prophet Muhammad, peace be upon him, with the Poor

The Prophet (SAWS) actually feared for his nation from surplus more than he feared from poverty,

“By Allah, it is not the poverty about which I fear in regard to you but I am afraid in your case that (the worldly) riches may be given to you as were given to those who had gone before you and you begin to vie with one another for them as they vied for them, and they may destroy you as they destroyed them .” 

Yet, he realized that poverty is quite a great trial.  Therefore, he used to supplicate to Allah (SWT) saying,

“O Allah, I seek refuge in Thee from disbelief and poverty.”

He also used to say,

“Steady us in our faith, and protect us from poverty.”

Because the Prophet (SAWS) realized the severity of the crisis of poverty and its attenuating impact on people, he supported the poor and even lived amongst them.

His life was not that different from the lives of the poor.  Lady Aisha (RA) narrated, “The family of Muhammad did not eat their fill for three successive days till he died.”

He treated the poor with mercy and kindness, and he used to give them whatever he could, although he, himself, was poor.  He also used to teach his companions to have mercy upon the poor as well.  Consider his kind, sweet words,

“O son of Adam! It is better for you if you spend your surplus (wealth), but if you withhold it, it is evil for you. There is (however) no reproach for you (if you withhold the essentials) for a living. And begin (charity) with your dependants; and the upper hand is better than the lower hand.”

He also said,

“If anyone gives as Sadaqa (charity) the equivalent of a date from that (earning) earned honestly, for Allah accepts that which is lawful, the Lord would accept it with His Right Hand, and even if it is a date, it would foster in the Hand of the lord, as one of you fosters his colt, till it becomes bigger than a mountain.”

And he said,

“Nothing is more delighting to me than this that Uhud should be of gold for me, and no dinar is left with me out of it before three nights pass except a dinar which I would set aside for the repayment of debt upon me.”

http://en.islamstory.com/mohamed-with-the-poor.html

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 10 August 2011 at 10:55pm
Prophet Muhammad's Care for The Poor

Because the Prophet realized the severity of the crisis of poverty and its attenuating impact on people, he supported the poor and even lived amongst them.

His life was not that different from the lives of the poor. Lady Aisha, may Allah be pleased with her, narrated:

“The family of Muhammad did not eat their fill for three successive days till he died.” (Al-Bukhari)

He treated the poor with mercy and kindness, and he used to give them whatever he could, although he, himself, was poor. He also used to teach his companions to have mercy upon the poor as well. Consider his kind, sweet words:

“O son of Adam! It is better for you if you spend your surplus (wealth), but if you withhold it, it is evil for you. There is (however) no reproach for you (if you withhold the essentials) for a living. And begin (charity) with your dependents; and the upper hand is better than the lower hand.” (Muslim)...

The Prophet was always keen to help the poor by giving them what he had, and when he could not find anything, he would ask his companions to help, not to leave a poor man without help...

http://www.onislam.net/english/reading-islam/about-muhammad/his-character/453418-prophet-muhammad-a-the-poor.html

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 25 August 2011 at 11:05pm

Philanthropy and Zakat

Oliver Goldsmith, the Irish poet, once said: "Where wealth accumulates, men decay."

Philanthropy is more than just a monetary gift-love of mankind shown by practical kindness and helpfulness to humanity is its dictionary meaning.

Zakat (almsgiving) is the third pillar of Islam; it is hard to translate the word or find its closest meaning in English. In Arabic, the word is derived from the root, "z-k-a." The verb, zakka, "to purify," also means, "to make something grow and develop." Zakat is commonly known as "almsgiving." This translation is not accurate if we consider the philosophy behind that pillar.

There is a difference between almsgiving-Sadaqah-and Zakat. Sadaqah (charity) is a voluntary service of any kind that is given from one person to another. Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) encourages everyone to give sadaqah (charity).

A smile, words of sympathy, even giving half a date can be sadaqah. Whatever the words-differentiated for juristic reasons, the spirit is to alleviate humanity's sufferings...

http://www.onislam.net/english/reading-islam/research-studies/islamic-thought/453626-philanthropy-and-zakat-.html


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