Hall of FameHall of Fame  Active TopicsActive Topics  Display List of Forum MembersMemberlist  Search The ForumSearch  HelpHelp  chatChat
  RegisterRegister  LoginLogin
General Discussion
 Whyislam.org Forums : General : General Discussion
Message Icon Topic: Stargazing... Post Reply Post New Topic
<< Prev Page  of 17 Next >>
Author Message
a well wisher  
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar
Religion: Islam(Muslim)
Posts: 8305
Forum Rating: 0
Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 17 June 2009 at 4:09pm
Yes its working now Brother muslimdude....a time lapse video...quite nice
 
Jazakh Allah Khair
La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah
No Guest-Voting   IP IP Logged
a well wisher  
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar
Religion: Islam(Muslim)
Posts: 8305
Forum Rating: 0
Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 23 June 2009 at 1:18pm
Colorful northern lights above Alaska. As noted by the photographer "It was March 3, 2001, and it was the birthday of a friend of mine. I was filming from the Knik Valley, just north of Anchorage, Alaska. Looking north, I knew the red aurora I was seeing was directly over my home city of Fairbanks, about 200 miles to the north, and also the home of my friend whose birthday it was that night. Like the flames rising from a set of birthday candles, it was easy to think of making a special wish if one could only blow out that magnificent light that night. Happy Birthday my friend! I hope you are looking up tonight." LeRoy Zimmerman/Photosymphony.com
 

TWAN is a global program of Astronomers Without Borders (www.astrowb.org) and a Special Project of International Year of Astronomy 2009, an initiative by IAU and UNESCO. The World at Night is to produce and present a collection of stunning photographs of the world's most beautiful and historic sites against the nighttime backdrop of stars, planets and celestial events. The eternally peaceful sky looks the same above all symbols of different nations and regions, attesting to the truly unified nature of Earth as a planet rather than an amalgam of human-designated territories.

Building bridges through the sky

The World at Night

www.twanight.org

 
 
 
La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah
No Guest-Voting   IP IP Logged
a well wisher  
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar
Religion: Islam(Muslim)
Posts: 8305
Forum Rating: 0
Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 25 June 2009 at 2:01pm

 
 
How to get started in Amateur Astronomy
 
When you look up at the darkened sky and gaze at the stars, some seem to be blinking, and you wonder why. All of a sudden, you can see a shooting star and the little dipper. The moon is in an eclipse, and a feeling of wonder overcomes you. There is so much up there to learn about and enjoy, and it is not difficult or expensive to become involved.
 
 
Steps:
 

Read about astronomy. Merely looking up in the sky will not teach you all you need to know, so visit your local library and browse through the astronomy section. There is a variety of books which are geared toward beginners as well as the more advanced. Find one that is an introduction to astronomy, and learn about the physics of the cosmos. Surf the Internet under 'Astronomy' and be assured you will receive a vast array of information as well as pictures.

Visit a planetarium or observatory. Many observatories have huge, expensive telescopes and offer you an exciting as well as informative way of observing the many wonders of the sky. Check with your local science museum to see if they offer a star-gazing night open to the public. Visit the observatory at night, climb up to the tower, and observe first hand, through their powerful telescopes, what you have learned and seen up until now only in books. A planetarium uses projectors to offer an artificial view of the night sky. The chairs recline, the room becomes black, and all you see are stars in a darkened sky. This is a great way to get started because you will have access to an expert guide to answer your questions. You also will get to meet others with similar interests.

Purchase a star atlas or a star map which will enable you to determine what you are looking at while gazing at the sky. Your library will probably have one, but since maps will be an important part of your astronomical study, it is best to buy your own. If you are unable to afford one, then download free star maps from the Internet.

 
Find someplace dark to observe that is away from city glare. Good choices might include national and state parks. Enquire at these places about naturalist lead presentations about the night sky as well. Use your eyes. It is not necessary to buy an expensive telescope because the naked eye can see a great deal in the night sky. By observing with only your eyes you get a true feeling of how ancient astronomers practiced their craft. If you can, try to lie down on the grass and look at the sky above you. The darkened sky takes on another dimension in this position, and creates a feeling of you being totally alone in a vast universe. Locate the North Star, and follow the 'map of the sky'. Make sure you have the correct star map to coincide with the date and location. If you have studied the books, you might be able to find the "Little Dipper" and other constellations or asterisms.
 
Buy a pair of binoculars. If your naked-eye observations have gotten you excited about astronomy, get a good set of binoculars and observe the night sky with them for a more close-up view. 10x50 binoculars are excellent for stargazing.

Obtain a telescope. There are several types of telescopes, with different features, uses and prices. However, you need not purchase the most expensive one in order to enjoy astronomy. The most important thing to consider is the telescope’s aperture, or the size of the light-gathering part of the telescope. The larger the aperture, the brighter your image will be. The next most important characteristic is the focal length of the 'scope, which will determine how much of the sky you can see in the image. Magnification is much less important than quality of optics. A good way to choose a telescope is to attend star parties (see below) and ask a few of the members for permission to try theirs so you get an idea of which models you prefer.

Join an astronomy club. Amateur astronomy is very popular in most cities and small towns. Search the Internet to find a club in your vicinity or get information by calling a local planetarium. Clubs give you the opportunity to learn from others who have more experience, and to meet and make new friends with other beginners who have the same interest in astronomy.

Attend a star party. Star parties are outdoor meetings where amateur astronomers meet and look at the sky together. Many are already members of an astronomy club. This can be quite interesting, especially since each person might find a new area, star or planet that you might have overlooked.

Subscribe to an astronomy magazine. There are a number of periodicals which cater to amateur astronomers. Among the most popular are Sky and Telescope and Astronomy. These magazines provide monthly calendars, a wealth of sky watching tips, amazing pictures, and up-to-date information on new products and discoveries.

Subscribe to an astronomy podcast, such as What's Up in Astronomy, StarDate, or SkyWatch. They are free and you can search for them in iTunes and many other podcast directories.

Join the Astronomical League or similar organization. Membership in these large astronomy organizations will give you the opportunity to network with other astronomers and to participate in observing programs. The Astronomical League has observing programs for every age, skill, and equipment level, and by participating in a program and submitting your observation log, you can earn certificates of completion (and a wealth of new knowledge).

Enjoy your new hobby. Amateur astronomy can be a lifelong pursuit, and there’s always something new to look at. What’s more, amateur astronomers actually make significant contributions to the study of astronomy, and amateurs have discovered stars, comets, and other phenomena before professionals. In astronomy, you don’t have to be a professional to make a difference.

 
 
La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah
No Guest-Voting   IP IP Logged
a well wisher  
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar
Religion: Islam(Muslim)
Posts: 8305
Forum Rating: 0
Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 01 July 2009 at 1:50pm
La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah
No Guest-Voting   IP IP Logged
a well wisher  
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar
Religion: Islam(Muslim)
Posts: 8305
Forum Rating: 0
Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 07 July 2009 at 12:27pm
The Shape of Time
Relates light cones and the end of the universe to the shaping of time.
 
 
 
 
"Time" - The Alan Parsons Project - Space Slideshow
 
 
La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah
No Guest-Voting   IP IP Logged
a well wisher  
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar
Religion: Islam(Muslim)
Posts: 8305
Forum Rating: 0
Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 08 July 2009 at 12:08pm
We Are Star Stuff - Cosmic Poetry
 
From the History's Channel "The Universe" series, season one; "Beyond The Big Bang". Neil deGrasse Tyson explains the connections we all have, with Sagan-like poetry.


Neil deGrasse Tyson is a leading astrophysicist, the director of the American Museum of Natural History's Hayden Planetarium, a columnist for Natural History Magazine, and the author or coauthor of six books.
 
 
La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah
No Guest-Voting   IP IP Logged
a well wisher  
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar
Religion: Islam(Muslim)
Posts: 8305
Forum Rating: 0
Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 09 July 2009 at 11:54am

Ever Wonder How Elements are Formed ? Fusion and Beyond!

La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah
No Guest-Voting   IP IP Logged
a well wisher  
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar
Religion: Islam(Muslim)
Posts: 8305
Forum Rating: 0
Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 12 July 2009 at 1:11pm
La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah
No Guest-Voting   IP IP Logged
Al-Cordoby  
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar
Moderator
Religion: Islam(Muslim)
Posts: 27702
Forum Rating: 159
Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 19 July 2009 at 10:00pm

Beautiful Chaos

Written by Nancy Atkinson


Can you imagine living in this region of space? Just think of the beautiful views you'd have in the sky – that is, if you survived the chaos as one galaxy is passing through the core of three other galaxies at ridiculous (ludicrous?) speeds (3.2 million km per hour / 2 million miles per hour) generating a shock wave of gas and X-rays.

This is Stephen's Quintet, A compact group of galaxies, discovered about 130 years ago, located about 280 million light years from Earth. The curved, light blue ridge running down the center of the image shows X-ray data from the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The galaxy in the middle, NGC 7318b is passing through the core of the other galaxies at high speed and is thought to be causing the ridge of X-ray emission by generating a shock wave that heats the gas. The most prominent galaxy in front (NGC 7320) is actually far away from the other galaxies and is not part of the group.

(See the Chandra webpage for a roll-over labeled version)

Additional heating by supernova explosions and stellar winds has also probably taken place in Stephan's Quintet. A larger halo of X-ray emission – not shown here – detected by ESA's XMM-Newton could be evidence of shock-heating by previous collisions between galaxies in this group. Some of the X-ray emission is likely also caused by binary systems containing massive stars that are losing material to neutron stars or black holes.

Stephan's Quintet provides a rare opportunity to observe a galaxy group in the process of evolving from an X-ray faint system dominated by spiral galaxies to a more developed system dominated by elliptical galaxies and bright X-ray emission. Being able to witness the dramatic effect of collisions in causing this evolution is important for increasing our understanding of the origins of the hot, X-ray bright halos of gas in groups of galaxies.

http://www.universetoday.com/2009/07/09/beautiful-chaos/

 



Edited by Al-Cordoby - 19 July 2009 at 10:02pm
Think Win-Win for a better world for all...

My Blog
Muslim Heritage

No Guest-Voting   IP IP Logged
a well wisher  
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar
Religion: Islam(Muslim)
Posts: 8305
Forum Rating: 0
Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 21 July 2009 at 12:07pm
Thank You Brother  Tarek for posting this.... what a beautiful chaos....Stephen's Quintet...amazing
 
This is interesting as well...wish one could witness these clouds...
 
July 15th, 2009

Invasion of the Noctilucent Clouds

Noctilucent clouds over Blair, Nebraska, USA. Credit: Mike Hollingshead


Be on the lookout for unusual – and beautiful – noctilucent clouds that are invading the North American and Europe. SpaceWeather.com says that these mysterious "night shining" clouds are on the increase. Some scientists think they're seeded by space dust. Others suspect they're a telltale sign of global warming. Whatever the reason, they are an amazing site, appearing around sunset. Mike Hollingshead took this gorgeous image on July 14 near Blair, Nebraska USA. "I've never seen noctilucent clouds before, even though I am often out looking," he said. "These were wonderful."

See below for another NLC image from my good buddy Stuart Atkinson in the UK:

 

Stuart Atkinson's image of NLCs near Kendal Castle in the UK. Credit: Stuart Atkinson

Stu took his NLC images (see more on his website Cumbrian Sky) in mid-June near historic Kendal Castle in the UK (one of Henry the 8th's wives lived there, Stu says).

SpaceWeather.com has a great gallery of NLCs, which also includes observing tips. The site says reports of these clouds are pouring in from Oregon, Washington, Idaho, South Dakota, central California and possibly northern Nevada. These sightings are significant because they come from places so far south.

When noctilucent clouds first appeared in the late 19th century, they were confined to latitudes above 50 degrees N (usually far above). The latitude of Blair, Nebraska, is only 41°30' N. (Cumbria in the UK is about 54 degrees N.) No one knows why NLCs are expanding their range in this way; it's one of many unanswered questions about the mysterious clouds. Find out more about NLCs here.

When and where will NLC show up next? "No idea," said Stu. "We can’t predict them in advance. They just… appear. All we can do is keep looking, on every clear night, just in case. We do know that this summer is expected to be a very good one for NLC-spotting because they appear more at “solar minimum”, and we’re in a deep, deep minimum now, so all we can do is keep an eye on the sky, and cross our fingers!"

 
La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah
No Guest-Voting   IP IP Logged
a well wisher  
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar
Religion: Islam(Muslim)
Posts: 8305
Forum Rating: 0
Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 22 July 2009 at 12:39pm

Nebulae

 

Cosmic Clouds

The word "nebula" is derived from the Latin word for "clouds". Indeed, a nebula is a cosmic cloud of gas and dust floating in space. More than one nebula are called nebulae. Nebulae are the basic building blocks of the universe. They contain the elements from which stars and solar systems are built. They are also among the most beautiful objects in the universe, glowing with rich colors and swirls of light. Stars inside these clouds of gas cause them to glow with beautiful reds, blues, and greens. These colors are the result of different elements within the nebula. Most nebulae are composed of about 90% hydrogen, 10% helium, and 0.1% heavy elements such as carbon, nitrogen, magnesium, potassium, calcium, iron. These clouds of matter are also quite large. In fact, they are among the largest objects in the galaxy. Many of them are dozens or even hundreds of light-years across. Nebulae have been divided into five major categories. These are emission nebulae, reflection nebulae, dark nebulae, planetary nebulae, and supernova remnants. Emission and reflection nebulae tend to be fuzzy in appearance and lack any noticeable shape or structure. They are also known as diffuse nebulae.

 

Types of Nebulae

Emission Nebula - An emission nebula is a cloud of high temperature gas. Within this type of nebula, a star energizes the atoms in the cloud with ultraviolet radiation. As these atoms fall back to lower energy states, they emit radiation. The process is similar to that of a neon light. This causes the nebula to glow. Emission nebulae tend to be red in color because of the abundance of hydrogen. Additional colors, such as blue and green, can be produced by the atoms of other elements, but hydrogen is almost always the most abundant. A fine example of an emission nebula is the Orion Nebula (M42).
Reflection Nebula - A reflection nebula differs from an emission nebula in does not emit radiation of its own. It is a cloud of dust and gas that reflects the light energy from a nearby star or group of stars. Reflection nebulae are frequently the sites of star formation. They usually tend to be blue in color because of the way that the light is scattered. Blue light is scattered more efficiently. The Trifid Nebula (M20) in Sagittarius is a good example of a reflection nebula.
Dark Nebula - A dark nebula is a cloud of dust that blocks the light from objects behind it. They are very similar to reflection nebulae in composition and look different primarily because of the placement of the light source. Dark nebulae are usually seen together with emission and reflection nebulae. The Horsehead Nebula in Orion is probably the most famous example of a dark nebula. It is a dark region of dust in the shape of a horse's head that blocks the light from a much larger emission nebula behind it.
Planetary Nebula - A planetary nebula is a shell of gas produced by a star as it nears the end of its life cycle. Their name can be a bit misleading. They actually have nothing to do with planets. These nebulae were given this name because they often look like planets due to their round shape. The outer shell of gas is usually illuminated by the remains of the star at its center. The Ring Nebula (M57) in Lyra is one of the best examples of a planetary nebula.
Supernova Remnant - Supernova remnants are created when a star ends it life in a massive explosion known as a supernova. The explosion blows a large amount of the star's matter out into space. This cloud of matter glows with the remains of the star that created it. One of the best examples of a supernova remnant is the crab Nebula (M1) in Taurus. It is illuminated by a pulsar which was created by the supernova.

Stellar Nurseries

Nebulae are often the sites of star formation. In fact, all stars, planets, and solar systems are formed from nebulae. A nebula may lie undisturbed for many millions or billions of years as it waits for just the right conditions. Eventually, the gravity from a passing star or the shock wave from a nearby supernova explosion may cause swirls and ripples within the cloud. Matter begins to coalesce into clumps and grow in size. As these clumps get larger, their gravity increases. Gravity continues to pull in matter from the nebula until one or more of the clumps reach critical mass. The clumps are forming protostars. As gravity squeezes even tighter, the core temperature eventually reaches 18 million degrees. At this point, nuclear fusion begins and a star is born. The solar wind from the star will eventually blow away all of the excess dust and gas. Sometimes other smaller clumps of matter around the star may form planets. This is the beginning of a new solar system. Several nebulae have been found to be stellar nurseries. The Eagle Nebula, and the Orion Nebula are both sites of active star formation.

Famous Nebulae

There are a few nebulae that can be seen with the naked eye and many more that can be detected with a good pair of binoculars. A telescope is required to bring our fine details. Unfortunately, the human eye is not sensitive enough to bring out the rich colors of most nebulae. It is the photograph that does the most justice to these incredible objects. Until recently, time exposures on film were the best way to bring a nebula's true colors. Today, digital photography has simplified the process. New tools like the Hubble space telescope are giving us views of nebulae that have never been seen before. Areas of active star formation have been identified in many galaxies that were once thought to be inert. Perhaps the most well known nebulae is the Orion Nebula, also known as M42. It is one of the very few that can be seen with the naked eye. It is a bright emission nebula over 30 light-years in diameter. The nebula is illuminated by a group of stars at its center known as the trapezium. Another popular favorite is the Lagoon Nebula, M8. It is much larger than the Orion Nebula, reaching over 150 light-years across the heavens. The Trifid Nebula, M20, is one of the most colorful. This reflection nebula contains a combination of elements that render it in rich hues of red, blue, and pink. Dark lanes of dust divide it into three distinct parts, giving rise to its name. One of the most famous planetary nebulae is the Ring Nebula, M57. This is a beautiful object that resembles a circular rainbow around a small central star. Another popular planetary nebula is the Dumbbell Nebula, M27. Its unmistakable bow tie shape gives it its name. The Crab Nebula, M1, is probably the best known supernova remnant. It is a shell of gas expelled by a supernova explosion. The nebula is illuminated by the 16th magnitude star remnant at its center. The Hubble space telescope has captured some breathtaking images of nebulae from all parts of the galaxy.

La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah
No Guest-Voting   IP IP Logged
a well wisher  
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar
Religion: Islam(Muslim)
Posts: 8305
Forum Rating: 0
Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 24 July 2009 at 10:11am

We may think our Sun is impressive, but it pales in significance when compared to the red supergiant Antares which burns more than 600 light years away.

In this stunning image Antares glows orange and is surrounded by reflected bright yellow gas and dust. It is considered a bruiser in the Milky Way, with a diameter 800 times that of our Sun and a luminosity which is 10,000 times brighter.

Antarres is the crowning star in the Rho Ophiuchus Nebulae Complex, considered by many astro-photographers to be the most beautiful area of the night sky.

The complex features stunning nebulae, which are huge clouds of interstellar gas and dust. A yellow reflection nebula surrounds Antares and the red areas of this image are created by hydrogen gas in red nebulae emitting light.

To the left of the picture a sensational blue reflection nebula surrounds the Rho Ophiuchi triple star and is a result of interstellar dust that is illuminated by nearby stars.

It also contains dark nebulae in strange murky shapes such as the ‘pipe nebula,’ which appears upside down to the left of Antares, and the ‘Dark River’ that flows down towards the bottom of the picture. Made up of hydrogen gas and thick dust clouds they hide background stars from view.

While the ‘Dark River’ is 500 light years away, the globular star cluster M4 (seen shining white above Antarres) is a whopping 7,000 light years from Earth. One of the largest such clusters in our galaxy,it is made up of more than 10,000 stars.

The colourful skyscape is a mosaic of eight panels spanning nearly 10 degrees across the sky. It is found in the constellation of Scorpius, which can be seen in the southern sky close to the horizon if you live in the Northern hemisphere.

It was captured over three months by Australian astro-photographer Jason Jennings on four different days. He had an exposure time of 16 hours with two hours per panel and used a £5,400 astronomy camera built for wide field space imaging.

— By Claire Bates

La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah
No Guest-Voting   IP IP Logged
a well wisher  
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar
Religion: Islam(Muslim)
Posts: 8305
Forum Rating: 0
Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 26 July 2009 at 10:18am

Audio slideshow: Chandra's first decade

Deployed by the space shuttle on 23 July 1999, the Chandra telescope is Nasa's flagship mission exploring the realms of X-ray astronomy.

The observatory, which is named after the Indian-American astronomer Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar, orbits the Earth once every 64 hours.

Here, Darren Baskill, an X-ray astronomer at the University of Sussex, explains Chandra's importance, and looks at some of the colourful images it has produced in the past 10 years.

 
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/8163008.stm
 
 
La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah
No Guest-Voting   IP IP Logged
a well wisher  
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar
Religion: Islam(Muslim)
Posts: 8305
Forum Rating: 0
Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 27 July 2009 at 10:51am
Pilgrim by Enya & The Hubble Deep Field by Tony Darnell
 
 
 
Pilgrim, how you journey
on the road you chose
to find out why the winds die
and where the stories go.
All days come from one day
that much you must know,
you cannot change what's over
but only where you go.

One way leads to diamonds,
one way leads to gold,
another leads you only
to everything you're told.
In your heart you wonder
which of these is true;
the road that leads to nowhere,
the road that leads to you.

Will you find the answer
in all you say and do?
Will you find the answer
In you?
Each heart is a pilgrim,
each one wants to know
the reason why the winds die
and where the stories go.
Pilgrim, in your journey
you may travel far,
for pilgrim it's a long way
to find out who you are...

Pilgrim, it's a long way
to find out who you are...

Pilgrim, it's a long way
to find out who you are...
La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah
No Guest-Voting   IP IP Logged
<< Prev Page  of 17 Next >>
Post Reply Post New Topic
Printable version Printable version

Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot create polls in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

Bulletin Board Software by Web Wiz Forums version 8.03
Copyright ©2001-2006 Web Wiz Guide
Disclaimer
The opinions expressed by members of the Whyislam Forum do not necessarily reflect the beliefs of the Whyislam Team, or any of its subsidiaries, or parent organizations.