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Massu  
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Massu Replybullet Posted: 03 August 2009 at 11:25pm
Oh, astronomy... there are few things that have affected me more than the night sky, even when I was very young.

Oddly enough, the most beautiful thing I've seen is the limb of the moon. We had a high-powered telescope outside one night as part of an Astronomy class lab, and we pointed it right at the Moon. It looked like I could just reach out and touch it. I used to dream about making it there when I was little, so to actually see mountains, to see the form and shadows cast by craters, things I'd only seen in pictures...

It's between that, and laying in my fiancee's driveway and seeing the Milky Way for the first time in my life.
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 09 August 2009 at 3:21pm

Yes I totally agree with you Brother Massu....the night sky affects one on a deeper level...the vastness....the majesty...the precision...the beauty...it overwhelms...Subhan Allah

 
 Binocular Astronomy-Get Sirius
 


The early evening dark skies are the perfect opportunity to spot the brightest star in the night sky – Sirius – and let it lead you on to some deep sky gems! So print off this article, grab your binoculars and a good friend and get outside!

Just after sky dark, head outside and look basically south for the "Scorching One". Even if you don't use binoculars, this 8.6 distant light year beauty sparkles and twinkles like a true diamond. Even though it's only the atmosphere which causes the effect, Sirius' beauty has been noted throughout ancient history in both culture and mythology. Small wonder, it's twice as large as our own Sun and 25 times more luminous! One of the earliest star charts done by Ptolemy recorded Sirius' position and in 1676 Edmund Halley noted its movement. While today we understand that stars with large proper motion mean they are closer to us than further away, it was definitely an eye-opening experience for early astronomers.

Now, open your eyes wide by using binoculars of any size and center on Sirius. Move slowly south about one average binocular field until you see a compression of stars. Congratulations! You've just spotted Messier Object 41. As incredible as it may seem, this bright cluster of stars may have also been noticed by Aristotle as far back as 325 BC… without modern optics! Spanning about 25 light years across, there are about 100 stars which are true members of the cluster. if you thought Sirius was bright, then take a close look for a reddish central star. It's 280 times brighter yet than Sirius! Thank heavens it's about 2,300 light years away or there would be no such thing as a "dark sky".

Now head back to Sirius and let's take a hop Northeast just a little more than two binocular fields. Do you see that small heart-shaped collection of stars? It's Messier Object 50. Although this galactic cluster contains about twice as many stars as M41, they are so faint they are difficult to see from light polluted skies. If you have larger binoculars, you can probably even spot some color differences between members.

Let's get Sirius again. This time we're headed almost due east about another two binocular fields. Messier Object 47 is quite bright by comparison, and with good reason; it's much closer than the other two clusters. This time we're only looking about 1,600 light years away. Like its other two star-studded companions, it's about the same age, but has fewer stars. This particular cluster curiosity was an instance where Charles Messier messed up. He recorded its position wrong! For now? Have a look around. These bright clusters are easily seen from most locations and all you have to do is…

Get Sirius!

 


Edited by a well wisher - 09 August 2009 at 3:31pm
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 12 August 2009 at 9:05pm

Meteor show reaches dazzling peak

Skygazers are observing a dazzling sky show, as the annual Perseid meteor shower reaches its peak.

No special equipment is required to watch the shower, which occurs when Earth passes through a stream of dusty debris from the comet Swift-Tuttle.

Budding astronomers are advised to lie on a blanket or a reclining chair to get the best view.

The National Trust has released online guides to seven top Perseid viewing sites in the UK.

As the cometary "grit" from Swift-Tuttle strikes our atmosphere, it burns up, often creating streaks of light across the sky.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/8197303.stm

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 20 August 2009 at 2:08pm
Meteor by Moonlight
Credit & Copyright: Babak Tafreshi (TWAN)

Explanation: Dark skies are favored for viewing meteor showers. But the annual Perseid Meteor Shower still entertained skygazers around the world this week even though the Moon brightened the night. At its last quarter phase and rising around midnight on August 13, after the shower's anticipated peak, the Moon is seen here above rock formations in the Alborz Mountains near Firouzkooh, Iran. With a dramatic desert landscape in the foreground, a Perseid meteor is streaking through the moonlit sky between the overexposed Moon and bright planet Jupiter at the upper right. A regular celestial event in the northern hemisphere, the Perseid Meteor Shower is caused by planet Earth's yearly passage through the dust stream cast off by comet Swift-Tuttle.

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 20 August 2009 at 2:12pm
 
Boundaries
 
The universe does not
revolve around you.
The stars and planets spinning
through the ballroom of space
dance with one another
quite outside of your small life.
You cannot hold gravity
or seasons; even air and water
inevitably evade your grasp.
Why not, then, let go?
 
You could move through time
like a shark through water,
neither restless or ceasing,
absorbed in and absorbing
the native element.
Why pretend you can do otherwise?
The world comes in at every pore,
mixes in your blood before
breath releases you into 
the world again.  Did you think
the fragile boundary of your skin
could build a wall?
 
Listen.  Every molecule is humming
its particular pitch.
Of course you are a symphony.
Whose tune do you think
the planets are singing
as they dance?
 
~ Lynn Ungar ~
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 27 August 2009 at 9:58pm

Trifid Nebula: A Massive Star Factory

The massive star factory known as the Trifid Nebula was captured in all its glory with the Wide-Field Imager camera attached to the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in northern Chile. So named for the dark dust bands that trisect its glowing heart, the Trifid Nebula is a rare combination of three nebulae types that reveal the fury of freshly formed stars and point to more star birth in the future

ScienceDaily (Aug. 26, 2009) — A new image of the Trifid Nebula, shows just why it is a firm favorite of astronomers, amateur and professional alike. This massive star factory is so named for the dark dust bands that trisect its glowing heart, and is a rare combination of three nebula types, revealing the fury of freshly formed stars and presaging more star birth

Smouldering several thousand light-years away in the constellation of Sagittarius (the Archer), the Trifid Nebula presents a compelling portrait of the early stages of a star’s life, from gestation to first light. The heat and “winds” of newly ignited, volatile stars stir the Trifid’s gas and dust-filled cauldron; in time, the dark tendrils of matter strewn throughout the area will themselves collapse and form new stars .........

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/08/090826073442.htm

 

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 29 August 2009 at 3:57pm
 

 
In the Koran, Allah asks, “The heaven and the earth and all in between, thinkest thou I made them in jest?” It’s a good question. What do we think of the created universe, spanning an unthinkable void with an unthinkable profusion of forms? Or what do we think of nothingness, those sickening reaches of time in either direction? If the giant water bug was not made in jest, was it then made in earnest? Pascal uses a nice term to describe the notion of the creator’s, once having called forth the universe, turn his back to it: Deus Absconditus. Is this what we think happened? Was the sense of it there, and God absconded with it? . . . “God is subtle,” Einstein said, “but not malicious.” Again, Einstein said that “nature conceals her mystery by means of her essential grandeur, not by her cunning.” It could be that God has not absconded but spread, as our vision and understanding of the universe have spread, to a fabric of spirit and sense so grand and subtle, so powerful in a new way, that we can only feel blindly of its helm.

Annie Dillard in Pilgrim at Tinker Creek, winner of the Pulitzer Prize 1974.



Edited by a well wisher - 29 August 2009 at 3:58pm
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 30 August 2009 at 3:20pm
 
 
Slowly the west reaches for clothes of new colours
which it passes to a row of ancient trees.
You look, and soon these two worlds both leave you,
one part climbs toward heaven, one sinks to earth,
 
leaving you, not really belonging to either,
not so helplessly dark as that house that is silent,
not so unswervingly given to the eternal as that thing
that turns to a star each night and climbs –
 
leaving you (it is impossible to untangle the threads)
your own life, timid and standing high and growing,
so that, sometimes blocked in, sometimes reaching out,
one moment your life is a stone in you, and the next, a star.
 
~ Rainer Maria Rilke
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 31 August 2009 at 8:50pm

 
Teach me your mood,
O patient stars.
Who climb each night,
the ancient sky.
leaving on space no shade, no scars,
no trace of age, no fear to die.

— Ralph Waldo Emerson

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My work is to carry this love
as comfort for those who long for You;
to go everywhere You’ve walked
and gaze at the pressed-down dirt.
What I most want
is to spring out of this personality,
then to sit apart from that leaping.
I’ve lived too long where I can be reached.
Who says the eternal being does not exist?
Who says the sun has gone out?
Someone who climbs up on the roof,
and closes his eyes tight, and says,
—I don’t see anything.
. . . . With one silent laugh
You tilted the night
and the garden ran with stars.


Rumi, Unseen Rain, John Moyne and Coleman Barks
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 04 September 2009 at 1:26pm
 

 
 
Immanence

The Sovereign Good is real, the world is dream;
The dream-world has its roots in the Supreme,
Who casts His image in the endless sea
Of things that may be or may not be.

The fabric of the Universe is made
Of rays and circles, or of light and shade;
It veils from us the Power's burning Face
And unveils Beauty and Its saving Grace.
 
 ~FRITHJOF SCHUON


Edited by a well wisher - 04 September 2009 at 1:27pm
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 06 September 2009 at 3:30pm
 
 
 
"Only the heart knows how to find what is precious."
~Fyodor Dostoevsky~


Edited by a well wisher - 06 September 2009 at 3:32pm
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 07 September 2009 at 11:00pm

Milky Way's Not-so-distant Cousin Likely Harbors Supermassive Black Hole

ScienceDaily (Sep. 6, 2009) — ESO has released a striking new image of a nearby galaxy that many astronomers think closely resembles our own Milky Way. Though the galaxy is seen edge-on, observations of NGC 4945 suggest that this hive of stars is a spiral galaxy much like our own, with swirling, luminous arms and a bar-shaped central region.

These resemblances aside, NGC 4945 has a brighter centre that likely harbours a supermassive black hole, which is devouring reams of matter and blasting energy out into space.

As NGC 4945 is only about 13 million light-years away in the constellation of Centaurus (the Centaur), a modest telescope is sufficient for skygazers to spot this remarkable galaxy. ........

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090902112111.htm

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 08 September 2009 at 5:44pm

Cigar Galaxy- This is an example of a 'starburst' galaxy. It has a high rate of star formation and is 5 times brighter than our own entire Milky Way Galaxy.
 
 
My heart is so small
it's almost invisible.
How can You place
such big sorrows in it?
 
"Look," He answered,
"your eyes are even smaller,
yet they behold the worlds."
 
~ Rumi(RA) ~
 
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