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a well wisher  
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 09 September 2009 at 11:03pm
Hubble Opens New Eyes On The Universe
 
ScienceDaily (Sep. 9, 2009) — NASA's Hubble Space Telescope is back in business, ready to uncover new worlds, peer ever deeper into space, and even map the invisible backbone of the universe.
 
Butterfly emerges from stellar demise in Planetary Nebula NGC 6302. (Credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble SM4 ERO Team)

The first snapshots from the refurbished Hubble showcase the 19-year-old telescope's new vision. Topping the list of exciting new views are colorful multi-wavelength pictures of far- flung galaxies, a densely packed star cluster, an eerie "pillar of creation," and a "butterfly" nebula.

With the release of these images, astronomers have declared Hubble a fully rejuvenated observatory. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, D-Md., unveiled the images at NASA Headquarters in Washington, D.C., on Sept. 9, 2009.

With its new imaging camera, Hubble can view galaxies, star clusters, and other objects across a wide swath of the electromagnetic spectrum, from ultraviolet to near-infrared light.....

Now that Hubble has reopened for business, it will tackle a whole range of observations. Looking closer to Earth, such observations will include taking a census of the population of Kuiper Belt objects residing at the fringe of our solar system, witnessing the birth of planets around other stars, and probing the composition and structure of the atmospheres of other worlds.

Peering much farther away, astronomers have ambitious plans to use Hubble to make the deepest-ever portrait of the universe in near-infrared light. The resulting picture may reveal never-before-seen infant galaxies that existed when the universe was less than 500 million years old. Hubble also is now significantly more well-equipped to probe and further characterize the behavior of dark energy, a mysterious and little-understood repulsive force that is pushing the universe apart at an ever-faster rate.

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NEW HUBBLE PICTURES: First Shots From Upgraded Orbiter
 
 
 
September 9, 2009--A dusty pillar lit from within by newborn stars is among the first cosmic beauties snapped by the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), a new instrument installed in May during the final servicing mission to refurbish the Hubble Space Telescope.

The WFC3 replaces the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, the longest working instrument aboard the orbiting observatory. That camera was responsible for some of Hubble's most iconic pictures, and WFC3 is expected to become one of the next most popular instruments: It's already scheduled to be used in over half of the spacecraft's observations over the next year.

"The installation of the Wide Field Camera was a little touch and go, but I'm happy to say it's working beautifully at the moment," Bob O'Connell, chair of the science oversight committee for the instrument, told reporters today at a press conference.

--Ker Than
—Image courtesy NASA, ESA, and the Hubble SM4 ERO Team
 
This new image of Stephen's Quintet, taken by the recently restored Hubble, shows a cluster of what appears to be five closely packed galaxies. But the quintet is an illusion: The bluish spiral galaxy in the upper left corner, called NGC 7319, is actually about seven times closer to Earth than the rest of the group.

Meanwhile, "the four yellowish galaxies you see are gravitationally interacting with each other," Hubble science chair Bob O'Connell said at a September 9, 2009, press briefing. "We expect that, over time, they will eventually merge into a single big galaxy."

Using its broad sensitivity to different kinds of light, Hubble's new camera spotted star clusters of different ages within the five galaxies--and star groups that can be seen only with infrared light.
—Image courtesy NASA, ESA, and the Hubble SM4 ERO Team
 
 
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 15 September 2009 at 12:53am

 

 
 
It is at night that faith in light is admirable.
~Edmond Rostand~


Edited by a well wisher - 15 September 2009 at 12:54am
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 17 September 2009 at 12:19am

 

 

 
 
 
"...space, time, and matter are interpretations which thought puts on the free creative energy of God."
 
~Muhammad Iqbal~


Edited by a well wisher - 17 September 2009 at 12:26am
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Saturn-Magic Rings

Because Saturn is tilted, when its rings are facing Earth edge-on they disappear from our view. We now know this happens every 14 years or so, but 16th-century scientist Galileo questioned his sanity when they "disappeared" and then "reappeared" a few years later. —NASA

A Floatable Planet

Saturn is the only planet in our solar system that is less dense than water. If you could build an imaginary gigantic bathtub, Saturn would float in it. --NASA

Photo Gallery: Saturn

Saturn's rings have bewitched sky watchers since Galileo first observed them in 1610. See why the second-largest planet in our solar system is also arguably the most beautiful.

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 19 September 2009 at 12:31am
 
The Eclipse
 
I stood out in the open cold
To see the essence of the eclipse
Which was its perfect darkness.
 
I stood in the cold on the porch
And could not think of anything so perfect
As man's hope of light in the face of darkness.
 
~ Richard Eberhart ~
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In faith there is enough light for those who want to believe and enough shadows to blind those who don't. 

 
~Blaise Pascal
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 24 September 2009 at 12:40am
 
 
 
 
Does sunset sometimes look like the sun is coming up?
Do you know what a faithful love is like?
You are crying. You say you have burned yourself
but can you think of anyone who is not hazy with smoke?
~Maulana Jalal Ud Deen Rumi(ra)


Edited by a well wisher - 25 September 2009 at 5:59pm
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 25 September 2009 at 12:04am
 
 
M8 Lagoon Nebula a star-forming region in Sagittarius
 
 
 
 
CHOOSE SOMETHING LIKE A STAR

O Star (the fairest one in sight),
We grant your loftiness the right
To some obscurity of cloud –
It will not do to say of night,
Since dark is what brings out your light.
Some mystery becomes the proud.
But to be wholly taciturn
In your reserve is not allowed.
Say something to us we can learn
By heart and when alone repeat.
Say something! And it says “I burn.”
But say with what degree of heat.
Talk Fahrenheit, talk Centigrade.
Use language we can comprehend.
Tell us what elements you blend.
It gives us strangely little aid,
But does tell something in the end.
And steadfast as Keats’ Eremite,
Not even stooping from its sphere,
It asks a little of us here.
It asks of us a certain height,
So when at times the mob is swayed
To carry praise or blame too far,
We may choose something like a star
To stay our minds on and be staid.

- ROBERT FROST -

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 25 September 2009 at 6:29pm
 
 
In the Heart of the Tarantula Nebula
Credit: ESA, NASA, ESO, & Danny LaCrue

Explanation: In the heart of monstrous Tarantula Nebula lies huge bubbles of energetic gas, long filaments of dark dust, and unusually massive stars. In the center of this heart, is a knot of stars so dense that it was once thought to be a single star. This star cluster, labeled as R136 or NGC 2070, is visible just above the center of the above image and home to a great number of hot young stars. The energetic light from these stars continually ionizes nebula gas, while their energetic particle wind blows bubbles and defines intricate filaments. The above representative-color picture of this great LMC nebula details its tumultuous center. The Tarantula Nebula, also known as the 30 Doradus nebula, is one of the largest star-formation regions known, and has been creating unusually strong episodes of star formation every few million years.

 
 
Into my heart's night
Along a narrow way
I groped; and lo! the light,
An infinite land of day.
 
~Maulana Jalal ud Deen Rumi (ra)
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 27 September 2009 at 6:58pm

 

A Halo for NGC 6164
Credit & Copyright: Don Goldman

Explanation: Beautiful emission nebula NGC 6164 was created by a rare, hot, luminous O-type star, some 40 times as massive as the Sun. Seen at the center of the cosmic cloud, the star is a mere 3 to 4 million years old. In another three to four million years the massive star will end its life in a supernova explosion. Spanning around 4 light-years, the nebula itself has a bipolar symmetry. That makes it similar in appearance to more familiar planetary nebulae - the gaseous shrouds surrounding dying sun-like stars.

http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap090507.html

 

 

 

 

“A billion stars go spinning through the night, blazing high above your head.
But in you is the presence that will be, when all the stars are dead.”

~Rainer Maria Rilke

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 28 September 2009 at 7:33pm
 Interactive, 360-degree Panoramic View Of Entire Night Sky
The first of three images of ESO's GigaGalaxy Zoom project — a new magnificent 800-million-pixel panorama of the entire sky as seen from ESO’s observing sites in Chile — has just been released online. The project allows stargazers to explore and experience the Universe as it is seen with the unaided eye from the darkest and best viewing locations in the world.
This magnificent 360-degree panoramic image, covering the entire southern and northern celestial sphere, reveals the cosmic landscape that surrounds our tiny blue planet. This gorgeous starscape serves as the first of three extremely high-resolution images featured in the GigaGalaxy Zoom project, launched by ESO within the framework of the International Year of Astronomy 2009 (IYA2009). The plane of our Milky Way Galaxy, which we see edge-on from our perspective on Earth, cuts a luminous swath across the image. The projection used in GigaGalaxy Zoom place the viewer in front of our Galaxy with the Galactic Plane running horizontally through the image — almost as if we were looking at the Milky Way from the outside. From this vantage point, the general components of our spiral galaxy come clearly into view, including its disc, marbled with both dark and glowing nebulae, which harbours bright, young stars, as well as the Galaxy’s central bulge and its satellite galaxies. As filming extended over several months, objects from the Solar System came and went through the star fields, with bright planets such as Venus and Jupiter. (Credit: ESO)
GigaGalaxy Zoom features a web tool that allows users to take a breathtaking dive into our Milky Way. With this tool users can learn more about many different and exciting objects in the image, such as multicoloured nebulae and exploding stars, just by clicking on them. In this way, the project seeks to link the sky we can all see with the deep, “hidden” cosmos that astronomers study on a daily basis. The wonderful quality of the images is a testament to the splendour of the night sky at ESO’s sites in Chile, which are the most productive astronomical observatories in the world...

The painstaking production of this image came about as a collaboration between ESO, the renowned French writer and astrophotographer Serge Brunier and his fellow Frenchman Frédéric Tapissier. Brunier spent several weeks during the period between August 2008 and February 2009 capturing the sky, mostly from ESO observatories at La Silla and Paranal in Chile. In order to cover the full Milky Way, Brunier also made a week-long trip to La Palma, one of the Canary Islands, to photograph the northern skies [1]. Once the raw photographs were in hand, image processing by Tapissier and ESO experts helped to convey accurately the night sky as our eyes behold it [2]. The resulting image, now available on GigaGalaxy Zoom, is composed of almost 300 fields each individually captured by Brunier four times, adding up to nearly 1200 photos that encompass the entire night sky.

“I wanted to show a sky that everyone can relate to — with its constellations, its thousands of stars, with names familiar since childhood, its myths shared by all civilisations since Homo became Sapiens,” says Brunier. “The image was therefore made as man sees it, with a regular digital camera under the dark skies in the Atacama Desert and on La Palma.”

As photographing extended over several months, objects from the Solar System came and went through the star fields, with bright planets such as Venus and Jupiter. A brilliant, emerald-green comet also flew by, although spotting it among a background of tens of millions of stars will be difficult (but rewarding).

Overall, the creators of the GigaGalaxy Zoom project hope that these tremendous efforts in bringing the night sky as observed under the best conditions on the planet to stargazers everywhere will inspire awe for the beautiful, immense Universe that we live in.

“The vision of the IYA2009 is to help people rediscover their place in the Universe through the day- and night-time sky, and this is exactly what the GigaGalaxy Zoom project is all about,” says project coordinator Henri Boffin.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090914110955.htm
 
 


Edited by a well wisher - 28 September 2009 at 7:43pm
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 03 October 2009 at 6:23pm
In a summer early morning under starry sky of Iran's Fars province, near the town of Saadat Shahr, winter constellations rise above Wild Pistachio trees. To the left of the observer the prominent stars of Orion (the Hunter) rise from the east. Taurus (the Bull) and the Pleiades star cluster are higher above. The bright "star" near the left edge is planet Mars. To the right of the observer the long celestial river, constellation Eridanus, dominates the south eastern sky.

Saadat Shahr, located close to Pasargadae World Heritage, is known as Astronomy Town in Iran because of a great passion to astronomy and skygazing among locals. Astronomy is involved with everyday life and culture here, after years of broad activity by the town's astronomy association which also resulted in Astronomical Society of Pacific 2006 Amateur Outreach Award for the main popularizer. Many wedding ceremonies end with star party and telescopic observation in Saadat Shahr; they occasionally switch off the whole town for their public observations; some taxis, doctors, and bakeries are free during the astronomy week; they have weekly sky report after the Friday's prayers in the main mosque; and they have named some of their streets after astronomers of the history. Babak Tafreshi/Dreamview.net
 
 
 
Two things fill the mind with ever new and increasing wonder and awe—the starry heavens above me and the moral law within me.

~Immanuel Kant, (Critique Of Pure Reason)

 

 
 
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 05 October 2009 at 6:26pm

 
 
 
 'The eye is meant to see things; the soul is here for its own joy.'
 
~Jalal-ud-deen Rumi (ra)


Edited by a well wisher - 05 October 2009 at 6:27pm
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