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a well wisher  
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 06 October 2009 at 5:52pm
 

 
A Golden Compass
 
 
Forget every idea of right and wrong
Any classroom ever taught you
 
Because
An empty heart, a tormented mind,
Unkindness, jealousy and fear
 
Are always the testimony
You have been completely fooled!
 
Turn your back on those
Who would imprison your wondrous spirit
With deceit and lies.
 
Come, join the honest company
Of the King’s beggars –
Those gamblers, scoundrels and divine clowns
And those astonishing fair courtesans
Who need Divine Love every night.
 
Come, join the courageous
Who have no choice
But to bet their entire world
That indeed,
Indeed, God is Real.
 
I will lead you into the Circle
Of the Beloved’s cunning thieves,
Those playful royal rogues –
The ones you can trust for true guidance –
Who can aid you
In this Blessed Calamity of life.

Look at the Perfect One
At the Circle’s Center:

He Spins and Whirls like a Golden Compass,
Beyond all that is Rational,

To show this dear world

That Everything,
Everything in Existence
Does point to God.

~Hafez of Shiraz~

 



Edited by a well wisher - 08 October 2009 at 11:41pm
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 08 October 2009 at 11:40pm
 
Observe the wonders as they occur around you.
Don't claim them. Feel the artistry
moving through, and be silent.
 
~Jalal-ud-deen Rumi (ra)
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 09 October 2009 at 7:12pm

This week, astronomers revealed a breathtaking image of the Lagoon Nebula and an infrared portrait of dust floating in the plane of the Milky Way

The Lagoon Nebula, a star-forming cloud of gas and dust about 5000 light years away, glows rosy pink in this image taken by the 2.2-m telescope at La Silla Observatory in Chile. It is the third and final image in a project called GigaGalaxy Zoom, which is intended to showcase the night sky at various resolutions. The first image in the trilogy showed the night sky as visible to the naked eye from a dark site; the second revealed the view of the galactic centre through an amateur telescope; and this one shows off what can be seen through professional telescopes. (Image: European Southern Observatory)
 
 
 
When a baby is taken from the wet nurse,
it easily forgets her
and starts eating solid food.
 
Seeds feed awhile on ground,
then lift up into the sun.
 
So you should taste the filtered light
and work your way toward wisdom
with no personal covering.
 
That's how you came here, like a star
without a name.  Move across the night sky
with those anonymous lights.
 
  (Mathnawi III, 1284-1288)
~Jalal-ud-deen Rumi (ra)
 


Edited by a well wisher - 09 October 2009 at 7:12pm
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 10 October 2009 at 10:35pm

The Sun, with all those planets revolving around it and dependent upon it, can still ripen a bunch of grapes as if it had nothing else in the Universe to do.

— Galileo Galilei

 

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 11 October 2009 at 7:30pm
 
 
 
 
 
"Man tries to make for himself in the fashion that suits him best a simplified and intelligible picture of the world. He then tries to some extent to substitute this cosmos of his for the world of experience, and thus to overcome it …. He makes this cosmos and its construction the pivot of his emotional life in order to find in this way the peace and serenity which he cannot find in the narrow whirlpool of personal experience . . . . The supreme task … is to arrive at those universal elementary laws from which the cosmos can be built up by pure deduction. There is no logical path to these laws; only intuition, resting on sympathetic understanding of experience, can reach them …"
~Albert Einstein

Intuition? Sympathy? Strange words for the origin of scientific knowledge...
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 14 October 2009 at 12:17am
 
 
Sky Merger - Interacting And Colliding Galaxies
 
 
 
 
 
The soul which cannot endure fire and smoke won't find the Secret.
 
- Diwan - Ode 887
~Jalal-ud-deen Rumi(ra)
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 15 October 2009 at 1:23am

Milky Way's Tiny But Tough Galactic Neighbor

ScienceDaily (Oct. 14, 2009) — A stunning new image reveals one of our nearest galactic neighbors, Barnard's Galaxy, also known as NGC 6822.


Astronomers obtained this portrait of Barnard's Galaxy using the Wide Field Imager attached to the 2.2-m MPG/ESO telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in northern Chile. Also known as NGC 6822, this dwarf irregular galaxy is one of the Milky Way’s galactic neighbors. The dwarf galaxy has no shortage of stellar splendor and pyrotechnics. Reddish nebulae in this image reveal regions of active star formation, wherein young, hot stars heat up nearby gas clouds. Also prominent in the upper left of this new image is a striking bubble-shaped nebula. At the nebula's center, a clutch of massive, scorching stars send waves of matter smashing into surrounding interstellar material, generating a glowing structure that appears ring-like from our perspective. Other similar ripples of heated matter thrown out by feisty young stars are dotted across Barnard’s Galaxy. The image was made from data obtained through four different filters (B, V, R, and H-alpha). The field of view is 35 x 34 arcmin. North is up, East to the left. (Credit: ESO)

The galaxy contains regions of rich star formation and curious nebulae, such as the bubble clearly visible in the upper left of this remarkable vista. The strange shapes of these cosmic misfits help researchers understand how galaxies interact, evolve and occasionally "cannibalize" each other, leaving behind radiant, star-filled scraps. .......

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/10/091014102018.htm

 

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 17 October 2009 at 1:25am

Barnard's Galaxy...stunning and pretty...Subhan Allah...

Ultracool Stars Take 'Wild Rides' Around, Outside The Milky Way

ScienceDaily (June 11, 2009) — Astronomers have found that stars of a recently discovered type, dubbed ultracool subdwarfs, take some pretty wild rides as they orbit around the Milky Way, following paths that are very different from those of typical stars. One of them may actually be a visitor that originated in another galaxy.

This image shows the orbits of all recently discovered ultracool subdwarfs in and around the Milky Way, as seen from 150,000 light years away. (Credit: Courtesy / Adam Burgasser)

"If there are interstellar cops out there, these stars would surely lose their driver's licenses," says Burgasser.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090609220557.htm
 
“Time and space - time to be alone, space to move about - these may well become the great scarcities of tomorrow”
~ Edwin Way Teale
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 18 October 2009 at 7:35pm
Orionids Meteor Shower Starts This Weekend
 
(October 16, 2009)Earth is currently plowing through space debris left behind by a visitor that last swung by during the Reagan Administration. Spawned by Halley's comet, which last buzzed the planet in 1986, tiny space rocks are the seeds of the annual Orionid meteor shower.

 

Beginning Friday, sky-watchers should see some of the year's first Orionids. And thanks to a moonless midnight sky, the shooting stars should be fairly simple to spot.

At its peak on Wednesday night, the Orionids shower should produce 20 to 25 meteors an hour—a "relatively decent show," according to astronomer Anita Cochran, of the University of Texas at Austin's McDonald Observatory.

While the Orionids are not as flashy as some other meteor showers, she said, "it's a known shower that comes along regularly, … and the moon will be down, so that will help."

A big, bright moon can make it hard to spot streaking meteors. But the moon will be new during this year's Orionids peak, she said, meaning it'll be dim and will dip below the horizon not long after sunset.

Orionids' "Very Recognizable" Region

The Orionids are so named because the meteors appear to radiate from near the constellation Orion, aka the Hunter.

This easily spotted constellation "kind of looks like an hourglass with a very recognizable belt of stars," said astronomer Mark Hammergren of the Adler Planetarium in Chicago.

In addition, "the constellation is visible from pretty much anywhere in the world, because it appears along a line of sight close to the Equator," he said.

How to See the Orionids

At this time of year, Orion rises at about 11 p.m. local time worldwide, so the best time to view the Orionids will be after midnight, Hammergren said.

For the best views, Hammergren and Cochran both recommend going to a dark site away from city lights and allowing enough time for your eyes to adjust to seeing fainter objects in the sky.

"You don't need binoculars," Cochran added. "Just lie back in a reclining chair or on a blanket and enjoy the show."

But dress warmly, Hammergren advised: "You always cool off more than you think you will just lying there—that's a lesson novice astronomers learn real fast!"

Orionid Meteor Shower's Famous "Parent"

The Orionid meteors are created by a band of small particles that circle through the solar system in the orbit of Halley's comet.

The comet is visible to the naked eye, and in the 1700s astronomer Edmond Halley was the first to correctly predict its return, calculating that the comet comes back every 76 years.

Later studies revealed historical sightings of Halley's comet—in circa-240 B.C. Chinese records and in medieval England's 11th-century Bayeux Tapestry.

But it wasn't until the 1800s that astronomers noticed that some large groupings of "shooting stars" also appeared at regular intervals. Still later, those groupings were linked to comets.

The mass of a comet is basically a fifty-fifty combination of dirt and ice left over from when the planets were forming about 4.5 billion years ago, the McDonald Observatory's Cochran explained.

When a comet comes into the inner solar system—which includes Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, and the asteroid belt—the sun's heat turns some of the comet's ice into gas. Without the ice to hold them to the comet, some rocky fragments fall away.

"That stuff doesn't just disappear," Cochran said.

"When Earth's orbit intersects with those dust streams, the particles hit the upper atmosphere, creating meteors."

No Orionid Clump

A fragment shed by a comet is usually no larger than a grain of sand. But sometimes those grains travel together in groupings, or clumps, which can be held together by gravity for hundreds of years, Adler's Hammergren added.

Since these clumps form when the comet is near the sun, Earth is most likely to hit them in years when the comet is once again close to the planet—resulting in a more spectacular meteor shower.

For example, next month astronomers expect Earth to pass through a clump of material left behind by comet Tempel-Tuttle, which might boost the annual Leonid meteor shower to produce as many as 500 meteors an hour.

But Halley's comet is now almost at its farthest point away from the sun, Hammergren said, so "I wouldn't expect a clump [for the Orionids] this year."

Still, he said, for fans of the famous space rock, the Orionids in any year are "a great chance to see a piece of Halley's comet in the sky."

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 20 October 2009 at 12:10am
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
In reality, as we shall see later, especially when we examine images of immenseness, tiny and immense are compatible. A poet is always ready to see large and small. For instance, thanks to the image, a man like Paul Claudel, in his cosmogony was quick to assimilate the vocabulary if not the thinking of contemporary science. The following lines are from his Cinq grandes odes (p.i8o): “Just as we see little spiders or certain insect larvae hidden like precious stones in their cotton and satin pouches, “In the same way, I was shown an entire nestful of still embarrassed suns in the cold folds of the nebula.”
If a poet looks through a microscope or a telescope, he always sees the same thing.

Bachelard’s Miniature

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 21 October 2009 at 12:06am

CARINA NEBULA
 
I can't stop pointing
to the beauty.
Every moment and place says,
"Put this design in your carpet!"
Every object and being in the universe is
a jar overflowing with wisdom and beauty,
a drop of the Tigris that cannot be contained
by any skin. Every jarful spills and makes the earth
more shining, as though covered in satin.
 
~Jalal-ud-deen Rumi(ra)
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 21 October 2009 at 7:44pm

Thy world the fish's and the winged things bower
My world a crying of the sunrise hour
In Thy world I am helpless and a slave
in my world is Thy kingdom and Thy power.
 
~Muhammad Iqbal (Payam e Mashriq-Message of the East)
 


Edited by a well wisher - 21 October 2009 at 8:17pm
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 23 October 2009 at 1:22am

Meteor shower: Orionids reach peak

The Orionid meteor shower, a trail of debris left in space by Halley's Comet, was at its most intense in the early hours of Wednesday.

The Orionids, seen from an observatory near the village of Avren, east of the Bulgarian capital Sofia Photo: AP

Experts were expecting to see dozens of meteors an hour in some places as the shower approached its peak this morning.

The annual Orionid shower, so-called because it appears from the direction of the constellation Orion, is created when earth passes through trails of debris floating through space.

It is visible from almost anywhere in the world, because Orion - "the hunter" - is on a sight line very close to the equator, but the best viewing is found in rural areas away from light pollution.

 
 
What are we trying to practice every day? If our friendship depends on
things like space and time, then when we finally overcome space and time,
we've destroyed our own brotherhood! But overcome space, and all we have left is Here. Overcome time, and all we have left is Now. And in the
middle of Here and Now, don't you think that we might see each other once or twice?"”
 
 ~Richard Bach
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 24 October 2009 at 1:51am
                          Hubble Finds Hidden Exoplanet
 
In 19 years of observations, the Hubble Space Telescope has amassed a huge archive of data--an archive that may contain the telltale glow of undiscovered extrasolar planets. Such is the case with HR 8799b, shown in this artist's concept. The planet is one of three extrasolar planets orbiting the young star HR 8799, which lies 130 light-years away. The planetary trio was originally discovered in images taken with the Keck and Gemini North telescopes in 2007 and 2008.

Image Credit: NASA, ESA, and G. Bacon (STScI)
 
The sky is the daily bread of the eyes.
Undoubtedly we have no questions to ask which are unanswerable. We must trust the perfection of the creation so far, as to believe that whatever curiosity the order of things has awakened in our minds, the order of things can satisfy. Every man's condition is a solution in hieroglyphic to those inquiries he would put. He acts it as life, before he apprehends it as truth.
 
~Ralph Waldo Emerson
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