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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote searching Replybullet Posted: 28 October 2010 at 1:33am
Being a respiratory therapist, I often work with the sickest patients in the hospital.  It does give me the opportunity to really connect with people, sometimes patients and sometimes their families when the patient can't communicate.  I really enjoy it.  It can be draining at times but I love to help people.  
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Masha Allah thats great Sister Searching.May Allah reward you for helping these patients.I really owe alot to all the respiratory therapists who worked with my brother during his COPD exacerbations...I am very grateful for the moral support they provided at that critical time...its not just physical ....they invest so much of their self into it...so thank youmay God bless you..
 
I feel nurses and therapists provide more care to patients in the real sense of the word and I have this deep admiration for them...they are healers ... The current generation of doctors have alot to learn from their bedside manners and their level of compassion.
 
 
Spiritual Medicine: Bridging the Gap Between Religion and Psychology
 

Historically, religion and mental health issues have had an uneasy relationship—and it goes both ways: people with mental illness have long faced stigma in religious communities, and mental health professionals have, for the most part, been suspicious of religion.

Mental health professionals are often trained to bracket out a patient’s religion in the name of professional boundaries, and have been encouraged to consider religion in the context of a medical model that can view spiritual beliefs as potential psychiatric symptoms. As psychologist David Lukoff explains:

This tendency, representing a form of cultural insensitivity, can be traced back to the roots of psychoanalysis as well as behaviorism and cognitive therapy. Freud saw religion as “a universal obsessional neurosis,” Skinner ignored religious experience, and Ellis viewed religion as equivalent to irrational thinking and emotional disturbance. Similarly, spiritual experiences have been viewed as evidence of psychopathology.

But the understanding of the role of religion and spirituality in mental health is changing. The California Mental Health and Spirituality Initiative (which grew out of a grassroots movement founded by activist and advocate Jay Mahler and other consumers, family members, and service providers) was established in June 2008 at the Center for Multicultural Development at the California Institute for Mental Health to advocate for the “inclusion of spirituality as a potential resource in mental health recovery and wellness.”

How would you define spirituality in relationship to individuals and communities mental health needs and concerns?

LM: I wouldn’t distinguish mental health from other health needs. As an individual who lives with chronic illness myself, I know that long-term illness can lead to a spiritual crisis, and that my own preferred spiritual practices go a long way in helping me cope with day-to-day situations. Why would it be any different for people with mental health conditions? In fact, I would say it’s even more important because when your mind and your emotions are affected, it can raise existential questions like, “Why me? Have I done something wrong to cause this to happen to me? Can I still rely on myself? What will the future hold for me?”

It appears that spirituality is very important to people who have lived with mental illness. What role does it play in recovery and wellness?

Jay Mahler: The experience of “madness” can include a profound experience of connection and spirituality; oneness with nature; and the meaning and purpose of life. The mental health system has viewed this spiritual aspect of madness as delusional and as only a manifestation of the mental illness; denying the profound and potentially positive effects of this experience. The experience of madness can also lead to a painful and heightened awareness of the hand you were dealt in your life and the inequities of society. For many people with mental health issues, spirituality is key to understanding this experience. It is essential in their journey of recovery. Also faith communities have provided a sense of belonging and welcome to me, and to others who have been marginalized and experienced stigma and discrimination resulting from the public’s fear of persons with psychiatric diagnoses.

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 03 December 2010 at 5:25pm
Hakim Archuletta "Deep Healing"
 
 
(About 5 mins)
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Background & Scientific Literature Review

“Prayer indeed is good, but while calling on the gods a man should lend himself a hand.”
Hippocrates (the Father of Modern Medicine)

 

Before the advent of modern medicine, ancient healing and medical care were inexorably connected with religion and superstition and there was no clear distinction between priests or sorcerers and physicians for many millennia.1-4 The shift to a modern approach to medical care which combines clinical observation, experimentation, and experienced based on reason and systematic science in the fifth century originated with the father of modern medicine, Hippocrates.4,5 He emphasized the importance of careful observation of the symptoms and signs of disease and approached ailments with a rational, nonsuperstitious perspective.6-9 However, Hippocrates did not completely exclude spiritual considerations from medical care, the Corpus Hippocraticum mentions a potential divine cause of disease and also states, “prayer indeed is good, but while calling on the gods a man should lend himself a hand.”10,11 Hippocrates held a holistic approach to the art of medicine and his treatments relied on the healing power of nature and was directed at the patient holistically – combining physical, mental, and spiritual components of therapy.7,9

 

The progress of science and technology has enabled more medical advances during the 20th century than in all previous centuries combined, from pharmaceuticals and surgical techniques to medical devices and diagnostic tools.12 Yet the rapid advancement of medicine has further separated the medical care of today from the holistic approach that Hippocrates taught. As it became possible to cure with new advances in medicine, prayer and the spiritual component of care was no longer considered a part of active medical therapy.1,13 William Osler addressed this separation in 1910, “apart from the more specific methods to be dealt with faith has always been an essential factor in the practice of medicine.”14 An example of the spiritual component of holistic medical care is the psycho-social-spiritual body of a patient that deals with thoughts, emotions, and suffering related to the disease or ailment versus the body that can be analyzed and described at the systematic and molecular level.15

 

Osler recognized that physicians should not denigrate the importance of a holistic approach in the healing process, because not all of the art of medicine is relegated to the science of causes, prevention, and treatment of human disease.14,16 Later in 1948, the more holistic perspective of medical care was affirmed by the World Health Organization (WHO) as they defined the concept of health as a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity in the Alma Ata Declaration.17,18 Not only was this disconnect in medical care observed by some health care providers, but many patients believe that their physicians should consider spiritual needs as a part of their medical care. In one study reported in 1994, 75% of patients wanted their physicians to address their spiritual commitment.19,20 A similar percentage of respondents (72%)  in a second study reported that their spiritual needs were supported minimally or not at all by the medical system.21

 

As modern medicine progressed and further split from a holistic approach and patients’ needs were not being met by the traditional medical care system, the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in the United States has increased. Data from the 2002 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) showed that 62% of respondents had used some form of CAM within the last 12 months. The most commonly used CAM was prayer, with almost half of all respondents reported using prayer for their own health (43%).22,23 When examining data from the 2007 NHIS, the percentage of respondents who reported praying for their health increased to 59%.24 The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) defines prayer as an active process of appealing to a higher spiritual power and can be individual or in a group on behalf of oneself or others.25 Prayer has been defined as a simple act of turning our heart and mind to the sacred13 and is a part of human spirituality, which can be practiced or pursued in a multitude of ways.20,25,-30

Therefore, a gap currently exists between the medical care provided by physicians in the current medical system and the holistic care, including a spiritual component, which many patients are seeking and many physicians identify as an area that needs to be addressed due to the clinical benefits and improved health outcomes shown across many studies.

 http://www.prayerinmedicine.com/background

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What Is This Thing Called Love?

It is believed to conquer all. It forms the cornerstone of all major religions and has been the primary call to action echoed by the great spiritual leaders throughout human history, from Buddha, Jesus, Muhammad, to Gandhi and the Dalai Lama. It has inspired countless poems, novels, songs, and films. Many people search for it their entire lives. Others find it everywhere they go. As the 1929 song written by Cole Porter asks, “What is this thing called love?” And how does love impact our physical and mental health? Can the emotion of love affect our overall well-being and the well-being of society? How can we cultivate love? We explored all these questions with Professor Stephen G. Post. Dr. Post is Professor of Preventive Medicine, Head of the Division of Medicine in Society, and Director of the Center for Medical Humanities, Compassionate Care, and Bioethics at Stony Brook University. He is currently a Trustee of the John Templeton Foundation (2008-2011). Professor Post is equally recognized as a leader in the study of altruism, love, and compassion in the integrative context of scientific research, philosophy, and religious thought.

M&B: Professor Post, can we say that academic research on health mostly focuses on the negative aspects, such as depression?

Well, I think most of the research is focused on human disease and deficit and illness, but now I think there’s a little more of a balance. People realize that, say, public health, isn’t just about getting rid of lead paint or getting rid of bugs and germs by washing your hands, but it’s actually a part of how we live our lives. When we live good, generous, positive lives we are healthier, happier and odds are that we live a little longer, too.

M&B: How do you define love, and based on your research can we say that we are born with it?

Well, what is love? I think love is something like this: When the happiness and the security of another person means as much to me or more than my own happiness and security, I love that person. That could be a child, it could be my spouse, a parent, a friend, a colleague at work, a student, or it could even be just somebody on the street. So what we’re talking about is the shift from a preoccupation with self, you know, “I’m the center of the universe,” and only relating to people insofar as they contribute to my little agendas and plans, but no further. So, I never really discover other people as valuable in themselves, and therefore I never get a sense of awe. I think that love responds to this human need for significance.

So are we born with it? Well, we’re certainly born with the capacity for it but it can be inhibited; in other words, it can be covered over if we’re raised in an environment that’s full of hurt and hatred. I like to say hurt people… people who are hurt usually tend to be hurtful. So how we grow up, what kind of support we have in our families, in our environment, that’s important. We all have that side; I don’t think one person is different than any other in that sense. I think we all have these two sides to us, the positive and the negative, and it’s up to us in a lot of ways to decide what we emphasize, what we decide to nurture and cultivate, and it’s very easy for negative emotions to take over, and then we get in this incredible cycle of hatred and violence.

M&B: Now, there is also some research showing that being good actually has certain health benefits too. Would you please tell us a little bit about that?

Being good in the sense of being generous toward others does have health benefits. In the 1990s there was a remarkable book published called Anger Kills. It was written by a cardiologist at Duke University named Reynolds Williams....

What positive emotions like love do is to move us away from that anger and hatred. Really looking toward other people, forgetting about your own problems and just being generous, getting into the flow of love, that really frees us from a lot of negative emotions. Therefore, the studies were quite remarkable. Young people going back to the 1920s who identify nobility of purpose as their major goal in life – they want to help other people – that group of young people tend to be healthier, happier and live a little longer. Even as they’re getting into their 80s and 90s, because now they’re old people, they’ve been followed up on every ten years, and they tend to get a benefit. Older adults, people 60 and older, who do a little volunteering instead of being isolated, have a tremendous reduction in death rates.
 
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Natural Healing Learning from Tradition 1/9

Hakim Archuletta

 
(10 mins)


Edited by a well wisher - 26 December 2010 at 4:27pm
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 20 January 2011 at 3:45pm
‘Acts of Worship slow down time'
 
In your work "Yavaşla" (Slow down) you talk about and criticize the fast pace of life in modern life. Is the month of Ramadan an opportunity  to slow down time?

K.S: Worship is a very original way to slow down life. People stop the normal flow of time through the time they set aside for worship and thus they develop a brand new dimension of time which will allow for them to a bridge with the eternal world. Thus, by deviating the notion of daily time, they end up speaking to themselves more and engaging in more introspection. Ramadan is one such opportunity that will allow for life to slow down and turn one towards the real reason for their creation after purging them of their material preoccupations. In Ramadan, people experience both hunger and thirst and find the opportunity to empathize with people. In the words of Ahmet Haşim they live to the fullest the peculiar elegance of "Muslim time." We can see Ramadan as an interruption, break or shaking in the face of fast-paced life.


Ramadan becomes a protest against modern civilization which sees life is revolving around a hedonistic axis and humans only being able to get somewhere in life through satisfying their material desires.

There exists a life outside of pleasure as well

While experiencing stress during fasting can be considered normal, we witness that people are tolerant and empathic during this time. As a psychiatrist, how would you evaluate this?

K.S: People can become quite bewildered when they are distanced their routine lives. Many people see Ramadan as an opportunity to find depth and beauty in the divine dimension this month offers. Ramadan provides us with a great opportunity to distance one's self matter and attain the knowledge of the divine as well as understand the essence of possessions. The feeling of hunger carries one into state wherein they feel the world is a finite place; the human being realizes that life is not a place that turns on a wheel which is based on pleasure. There is life outside of pleasure. We experience this spiritual joy in Ramadan. We waiver our material pleasures for spiritual pleasures. Thus Ramadan becomes a protest against modern civilization which sees life as revolving around a hedonistic axis and humans only being able to get somewhere in life through satisfying their material desires. Because in the month of Ramadan, people will enter a brand new dimension of time, thinking and existence. The global system cannot interfere in this regard. Ramadan is outside of the global system. To this end, I perceive Ramadan as a month of resistance.

Some people may become angered due to their various addictions to things such as food; however, we should also remember that Ramadan is also abstaining bad words, acts and rage. In essence, we are refraining all that is bad during Ramadan. Thus, this month is a great opportunity for man to train his or her ego; for the ego to be gated in and for the caprices of the ego to be tamed.



How is that people can exert such level of self-control in this month when they normal resist rules that have been imposed upon them by others?

K.S: Discipline systems which are a result of cruelty of man imposed on another will never go anywhere. This will only anger, stress and undesired reaction in people. People feel to need to oppose such methods in a reactionary way. Nobody can be molded into a form or consistency without their own will. One of the most basic factors leading to a person feeling that they are alive is comprehension of existence that which is superior to and above them. We dream about an ideal that won't cease to exist and decay with time like us. When we catch a hold of this ideal -- religion helps one in this regard -- they can stand tall in the face of the greatest adversities

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Prayer Can Help People Handle Difficult Emotions, Study Suggests
 
 Those who choose to pray find personalized comfort during hard times, according to a University of Wisconsin-Madison sociologist. The 75 percent of Americans who pray on a weekly basis do so to manage a range of negative situations and emotions -- illness, sadness, trauma and anger -- but just how they find relief has gone unconsidered by researchers.
 

Through the course of in-depth interviews with dozens of victims of violent relationships with intimate partners, Shane Sharp, a graduate student studying sociology at UW-Madison, gathered an array of ways prayer helped them deal with their situation and emotions through coping mechanisms such as venting. Sharp's interviewees represented a wide swath of the United States in geographic, educational and racial terms, and came largely from Christian backgrounds.

Those who were boiling with anger said they found "a readily available listening ear," says Sharp, who explores how prayer helps manage emotional pain in the current issue of the journal Social Psychology Quarterly.

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Basking in Human Goodness

Be not forgetful to entertain strangers: for thereby some have entertained angels unawares." What a timely, important reminder from The Epistle of Paul to the Hebrews. I hereby take a stand for the abundance of human goodness. Lost in media glare and the dull ache of negativity is the reality that most people are good at heart, an acknowledgment that Anne Frank willingly made towards the end of her too short life.

Scottish philosopher David Hume intrigues students with his belief in a feeling of natural sympathy that courses through human society. By and large we care about each other: I want what's best for you and regret your misfortunes. Cynicism often comes almost automatically in 2010 (and in his day as well), however, and some students are quick to suggest that such naiveté would never be possible today; times must have been better in Hume's 18th century. But even a cursory look at European history during his time refutes this jump to conclusion, with a plentitude of religious and civil war. Hume did admit, based on his personal experience and career as an historian, to a tiny fraction of humanity which appears to be devoid of any trace of this innate sympathy. This "bestial lot" defies any explanation; he lets this miniscule population remain a mystery, to him and for his readers.

I ask you, as I ask my students, this question: On any given day, what is your experience of humanity? Are most people you encounter decent? Though almost all will remain "strangers" and you won't cross paths again, was this one exchange amicable? If you are primed to look for it, do you see evidence of this flowing current of sympathy that binds us together? My answer is a resounding "yes." Almost all students of all ages agree. The "bestial lot" may garner the limelight, but pockets of good will wait to be picked. The good-natured Hume can point to all-too-many cases in which he and we go against this spirit of good will. We hurt each other, ‘tis true. We have bad days, atrocious days. But sympathy is real; even when we turn away from it, we know better. General good will links us securely. Are we predisposed these days, somehow, to assume the worst? Is pessimism cool? Any assumption was anathema for Hume and unwarranted opinions were always his primary philosophical targets. So he asks us again: Where in your experience have you found support for your beliefs about human nature? What does your experience of the world teach you? Not the news, twittered or blogged; not movies, magazines, or music - - - what about your own, everyday, very personal experience of humanity?

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At Times Let Go And Depend On God

Daily life is filled with a steady stream of problems to be solved, obstacles to be overcome, and conflicts to be resolved. These issues may be as insignificant as traffic-related nuisances or as significant as finding a job or the right spouse.

You do your best to cope with these challenges, with varying degrees of success. Intelligence, determination, and judgment are sufficient resources for challenges that are man-made and even then, you can feel overwhelmed by the accumulation of minor negative events. Frantic recreational activities that are supposed to relieve your stress may only compound the problems. Whenever you feel overwhelmed, you need to retreat to your sanctuary, meditate on God, and feel safe and calm before you are able to relaunch into the world. God is your querencia-the place in the bullring to which a bull can safely retreat from the matadors-where you can pause and gather strength before returning to the fight. You must pause, however briefly, to regain the strength needed to battle the stresses of daily living.

Issues in life that aren't man-made, such as illness or natural disasters, are beyond the province of your intervention. Attempting to find solutions to such problems will generate a sense of impotence and helplessness and often will lead you to incorrect conclusions. Worrying depletes your inner resources and has no redeeming quality. It won't even motivate you. Even retreating into sanctuary and refueling yourself will not bring the solution that you seek relentlessly. This is when you turn the problem over to God and find strength in yielding. You need to give up the equation of "a problem, divided by recognition of it = a solution," and let yourself simply experience your dilemma, and have faith that God is not in a dilemma.

Make a habit of going to the sanctuary of God when you don't need His help. Such devotional practice helps you find sanctuary quickly when you really need it. In times of easy sailing, you may feel that you don't need anyone's help-including God's. But when you hit a tempest, you'll realize how much you need God's guidance. Letting God take the helm is not passive resignation. You are actively bringing your mind to intertwine with the Divine Power. Don't go back and forth to God according to your needs. Stay with God. Let Him envelop your mind in all times, good or bad.

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Might "healing prayer" actually heal?

 
But can prayer be healing?

A new study, which looked at the efficacy of proximal prayer in relieving auditory and visual impairments, suggests the answer might be a (very) qualified "yes."

The study did not seek to explain the mechanisms by which PIP might work.

Whether scientific research should address prayer has been vehemently contested in recent years. Brown argues it should:

If empirical research continues to indicate that PIP may be therapeutically beneficial, then -- whether or not the mechanisms are adequately understood -- there are ethical and nonpartisan public policy reasons to encourage further related research... It is a primary privilege and responsibility of medical science to pursue a better understanding of therapeutic inventions that may advance global health, especially in contexts where conventional medical treatments are inadequate or unavailable.

http://scopeblog.stanford.edu/archives/2010/08/healing-prayer.html



Edited by a well wisher - 12 February 2011 at 3:29pm
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It seems that prayer would be helpful to the friend or family member who is praying too. I know I always feel so much more calm after I pray.
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Spirituality and Health: Harold Koenig

 
Can spirituality prolong your life? Investigators at Duke University have found that a lack of private religious activity - such as meditation, prayer or Bible study - is a significant predictor of mortality. (See the story)

Joining us Thursday to talk about this topic is Harold Koenig, an associate professor of psychiatry and an associate professor of medicine at Duke University. He is director and founder of the Center for the Study of Religion/Spirituality and Health at Duke; editor of the International Journal of Psychiatry in Medicine; and founder and editor in chief of Research News in Science and Theology, the monthly international newspaper of the John Templeton Foundation. His latest books include the Handbook of Religion and Mental Health (Academic Press, 1998), The Healing Power of Faith: Science Explores Medicine’s Last Great Frontier (Simon & Schuster, 1999), and Religion and Health: A Century of Research Reviewed (Oxford University Press, forthcoming).

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Health Guidelines From Quran And Sunnah

This article is not about the glory of Islamic Medicine of past 1000 years which produced great physicians like al Razi and Ibn Sina.

This article is also not about virtues of honey, the center point of discussion in most of the articles written these days on Islamic Medicine.

This also is not an article saying that since science has now confirmed certain Quranic statements, therefore Quran must be a divine book. To the contrary, we begin with the belief that all Quranic statements are true, science has confirmed some of them in the past, and will confirm the rest in the future. If science has not confirmed it yet, it needs to examine its data more deeply, or maybe repeat the experiment, rather than question the authenticity of Quran.

The Quran is not a book of medicine or of health sciences,but in it there are hints which lead to guidelines in health and diseases. Prophet Mohammed (peace and blessings be upon him) has been sent as an example to mankind so his traditions in matters of health and personal hygiene are also a guide for his followers.

We start our discussion with the following verse:

"Everything good that happens to you (O Man) is from God, everything bad that happens to you is from your own actions". (Quran 4:79).

Therefore, pathology (disease) is defined by the famous pathologist William Boyd as physiology (natural state) gone wrong. It is our tampering with the natural process that leads to unnatural outcomes. ...

The belief in God is the first and foremost important need for spiritual stability.

Belief in God includes belief in His attributes, His angels, His books, the Day of Judgment, the Heaven and Hell and belief that - all good and bad is within His reach.

Imam Rumi has called faith being superior to prayers. In illness, according to Imam Ghazali, the awareness of God increases and man becomes closer to God by realizing his own weakness.

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