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a well wisher  
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 18 July 2011 at 6:52am

Running on empty:Fasting restricts calories and may benefit your body


Called intermittent fasting, this rather stark approach to weight control appears to be supported by science, not to mention various religious and cultural practices around the globe. The practice is a way to become more circumspect about food, its adherents say. But it also seems to yield the benefits of calorie restriction, which may ultimately reduce the risk of some diseases and even extend life. Some fasters, in fact, ultimately switch from regular, if comparatively rare, periods of hunger to permanent deprivation. They limit calories all the time.

"There is something kind of magical about starvation," says Dr. Marc Hellerstein, a professor of endocrinology, metabolism and nutrition at UC Berkeley, who studies fasting.

Adds Mark P. Mattson, chief of the laboratory of neurosciences at the National Institute on Aging: "In normal health subjects, moderate fasting -- maybe one day a week or cutting back on calories a couple of days a week -- will have health benefits for most anybody." Mattson is among the leading researchers on the effects of calorie restriction and the brain.

Not all nutrition professionals see the merits of fasting. Some think of it as a recipe for disaster, setting up a person for binge eating and metabolic confusion.

Ruth Frechman, a registered dietitian in Burbank and spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Assn., says she frequently sees such extreme strategies backfire. "You're hungry, fatigued, irritable. Fasting is not very comfortable. People try to cut back one day and the next day they're starving and they overeat."

Researchers who study fasting and caloric restriction, however, say the body's hunger cycle ultimately adjusts.

And from a biological standpoint, they say, fasting can be helpful whether someone is overweight or normal weight.

"We're brilliant at this," Hellerstein says, referring to humans' physical reaction to not eating. "We're not good at responding to too many calories, but we're very good at responding to fasting. Fasting, in itself, is not an unhealthy process."

"By the end of three weeks of fasting you are a completely different metabolic creature," he says.

"It affects many, many processes -- but in a somewhat predictable way that takes you toward disease prevention."


Researchers aren't sure why the body apparently benefits from a state of mini-starvation. One theory is that the process produces just enough stress in cells to be good. "What our evidence suggests is that nerve cells in animals that are on dietary energy restriction are under mild stress," Mattson says. "It's a mild stress that stimulates the production of proteins that protect the neurons against more severe stress."

What they do know is that occasionally going without food or reducing calories daily makes the body more sensitive to insulin, which helps maintain normal blood sugar levels. And animal studies suggest calorie restriction may reduce the risk of cancer by slowing the growth of abnormal cells.

"We've been finding that putting an animal on a reduced-calorie diet for a couple of weeks dramatically slows cell proliferation rates," Hellerstein says. "This is the case in pretty much every tissue you look at: prostate, skin, colon, liver, lymphocytes."

Intermittent fasting and calorie restriction have also been shown in animals to reduce cognitive decline in diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, Mattson says.

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 04 August 2011 at 6:35pm

Overeating - By Hakim Archuletta

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rmYBMd7wBRU

(About 10 mins)

 

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 11 August 2011 at 6:02pm

Ramadan Detox

Dr. Rehan Zaidi shares important strategies for a healthy Ramadan. Dr. Zaidi discusses how we can easily detoxify ourselves during Ramadan for more energy, clarity and overall health. The detox process includes tips and advice on food selections.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qTKGVKkLC-k&

(About 16 mins)

 

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 15 August 2011 at 10:32pm

Medicine of The Prophet (pbuh)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NvOQivNkpxo

(About 5 mins)

The Disconnected Physician

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VUrUkNMDuvQ

 

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 16 August 2011 at 4:26pm

Appreciating Allah's Creation  (The importance of Gratefulness)- By Hakim Archuletta

Wholeness and Wisdom -Holistic Medicine

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0QgA4uZ8xWQ

(About 9 mins)

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 03 September 2011 at 6:42am

Depressed in `Eid? If Yes, Read This!

Depression is now the zeitgeist of our time in all parts of the world. Everyone has his own reasons and problems that make him depressed and having low self-esteem.

With `Eid now approaching -which is supposed to be the most joyful occasion to all Muslims, how can one feel the joy of `Eid despite his depression and problems? Can `Eid be a starting point for overcoming depression altogether?

The answer to the previous question is that regardless of the event, we still need to explore the cause of our depression and seek ways to resolve it.

You have to investigate whether or not your depression is circumstantial, or if you have a depressive disorder. If it is circumstantial, you will want to ask yourself if celebrations trigger feelings of low self-esteem for you, or if you personally experience the remembrance of grief, either consciously or unconsciously during times like these.

Especially this `Eid is a perfect starting point for working through our issues, as it is a reward for Muslims who struggled through Ramadan and achieved a whole month fasting.

It is a solemn holiday, one of remembrance of how obedience to our Lord is the answer to everything. This means surrendering your life, your whole being, all that you are, all that you have and all that you identify with to the Lord.

When you sacrifice everything that you identify with to Allah, He gives to you your authentic and eternal self. That is the spiritual “secret” that so many humans seek. The experience of Eid can definitely get you in touch with this “secret” if you surrender to the experience, and to Allah.

Wellness, happiness, wholeness…this is the state of being that we are indeed striving to experience.By detaching from limiting beliefs, and ways of behaving that no longer serve our well being, we are sacrificing all that is false in us, all of the images of ourselves that we hold on to, for something better, authenticity.

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 18 October 2011 at 1:52pm
I have this problem: a reflection on healing

I have this problem. Anyone who’s been in my company has probably noticed it. And anyone who knows me can attest to it.

A scab cannot exist without me picking it. If there is a scab of any sort, it *must* be picked. And I can’t rest until it is!

So recently there’s been a battle between this self-destructive tendency and my body’s healing process. It’s like a race—who can work faster. But one day while I was looking at the damage I once again caused to my poor defenseless skin, I realized something. I keep picking, but it keeps healing. I pick again. It heals again. It doesn’t get tired of giving me a second, third, 555th chance. No matter how many times I pick at it, it still heals. It still gives me another chance to get it right.

So it got me thinking about how many things in our lives we mess up again and again and again. It got me thinking about how many things we keep getting wrong, how many things we do to hurt our own selves. And yet, Allah keeps mending it. Again and again and again. Allah never grows tired of mending it. He never grows tired of healing us. Subhanna Al-Jabbar. Wa Allahu akbar.

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 22 October 2011 at 3:50pm
Natural Healing in Islam
 
Did you know that a lot of the natural remedies of today have a basis in religion. All religions from around the world agree on the healing powers of things in nature like herbs, spices, honey, and even fresh water. Last year, I was searching for a natural remedy for my son’s skin rash and came across Hakim Archuletta, a health expert and homeopath who happened to be visiting Bahrain at the time. What I learnt (and am still learning) from him is better than any education. Hakim has a beautiful viewpoint of natural healing and puts it all in the context of the teachings of Islam. In tough political times like these, Hakim shows you a side of Islam that the world rarely sees. People of all backgrounds can benefit from this! You’ll know what I mean when you listen to this fascinating episode...
 
 
 
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 26 October 2011 at 11:34am
Can Islam Cure Modern Health Problems?

http://www.tariqramadan.com/Can-Islam-Cure-Modern-Health.html
(27 mins)
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 11 January 2012 at 11:02pm
Can Prayer Heal the Ill?

The number of Americans who pray for their own health has more than tripled, from 13 percent of US adults in 1999 to 49 percent in 2007, according to a new studypublished in Psychology of Religion and Spirituality. The researchers also reported that those whose health had changed—either for the worse or better—prayed more often, and that women were more likely to pray about health matters than men.

What about praying for the health of others?

"Very powerful, and remarkable studies show that asking for blessings for those who are ill is effective, even when prayer is offered from a distance or patients don’t know they’re being prayed for," says Susan Barbara Apollon, a Pennsylvania-based psychologist and author of Touched by the Extraordinary, Book Two: Healing Stories of Love, Loss & Hope.

"Through prayers offered from the heart, miracles can happen."

Here’s a look at some intriguing research about the effects of "intercessory prayer" (praying on someone else’s behalf), either in the patient’s presence (proximal prayer) or from a distance, on various disorders. ...

Vision and hearing

Cardiovascular disease (CVD)

AIDS
 
Infertility
 
The bottom line

Researchers continue to debate whether or not prayer can heal the ill—and if this is an appropriate topic for scientific study. One factor that makes randomized studies difficult is that it’s hard to be sure that the no-prayer "control group" isn’t receiving prayers from friends and family members outside the study, so if prayer works, "uncontrolled" prayer could skew the results. And for those who believe in the healing power of prayer, a negative study isn’t likely to stop them from practicing their faith.

In the end, says Apollon, seeking blessings for the sick is an expression of love. "Every prayer is answered, but not always in the way that we want."

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 13 February 2012 at 4:00am
The Role of Alcohol in Inducing Cancer

We often see the alcohol industry’s enticing advertisements and the media’s hyperbole telling us: “Wine Is Good for You.”

What is frequently overlooked is that it may have some good effects, but its bad effects far outweigh the good. In a response to a query about alcohol, the Qur’an says:

[They ask you concerning wine and gambling. Say: In them is a great sin, and some benefit, for men; but the sin is greater than the benefit] (Al- Baqarah 2:219).

Since the Qur’an was revealed, modern science has shown alcohol to be the cause of a number of health problems, cancers included. This has been established over a number of years through a large number of epidemiological studies, in many countries, on individuals from a variety of backgrounds.

One study revealed that in the United States, for example, 75 percent of esophageal cancers and 50 percent of oral cavity cancers are attributed to alcohol consumption (Rothman et al, 1980)...

http://www.onislam.net/english/health-and-science/faith-and-the-sciences/442362.html


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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 20 February 2012 at 12:01pm

Health Benefits of Saying "Alhamdulillah"

There are many examples in the Qur'an and Hadith of the virtues of a positive mental attitude, perseverance and optimism in the face of adversity.

However, did you know that patience and a positive outlook on life are two of the greatest healing tools that you can use?
The Qur'an (2:155) says, "Give glad tidings to those who exercise patience when struck with adversity and say, 'Indeed, we belong to God and to Him is our return.' Such ones receive [the] blessings and mercy of their Lord, and such are the guided ones."

According to the findings of modern science, it appears that this mercy may often come in the form of improved health
...

There is much wisdom in the Prophet's (SAW) statement (narrated by Abu Huraira), "The strong [person] is not the one who overcomes the people by his strength, but the strong [person] is the one who controls himself while in anger." In fact, staying patient and calm is key to physical strength.

Phosphorus is not the only nutrient that can be depleted by mental stress and a lack of spiritual calm. If the thyroid gland, the primary organ to handle our emotions, works overtime, we can suffer from a deficiency in iodine. Stress from a demanding job, a divorce or relocating can cause a loss of potassium and sodium in the body because it effects the adrenal glands creating more of a need for these minerals.

Even hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) can be caused by excitement. The prophet (SAW) recommended our taking the more moderate path in life; however, we often engage in or expose ourselves to intense excitement by yelling, excessively watching television, and going to the mall, movies, parties, amusement parks, etc. When we see something exciting, our adrenal cortex is stimulated and there is an increase in our blood sugar. This, in turn, stimulates the pancreas to secrete insulin into the blood to lower the sugar level, causing us to then feel tired or weak.

It produces calm and health to practice saying, "Alhamdulillah" for what we have and for what we are faced with.

We should try to keep our home and work environments peaceful and as free from stress as possible...

http://www.onislam.net/english/health-and-science/faith-and-the-sciences/422632-health-benefits-of-saying-qalhamdulillahq.html


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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 09 March 2012 at 10:53am
Despair/ Pain?-Yasmin Mogahed
 
 
 
(About 5 mins)
 
Coping With Loss - Yasmin Mogahed
 
 
(About 18 mins)
 


Edited by a well wisher - 09 March 2012 at 10:58am
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 11 March 2012 at 7:43am
Grandeur in the Miniscule
 
.“Surely, in the creation of the heavens and the earth, and in the alternation of night and day, are signs for those of understanding,” (Qur’an, 3:190). All this pristine beauty got me thinking about the sunnah (way) of Allahsubhanahu wa ta`ala (exalted is He) in His creation—that He created the greatest of things out of smaller components; the clouds and oceans from tiny water molecules, the mountains from grains of sand, rocks and pebbles, giant forests and gardens from individual plants and trees. In living organisms too, entire systems are composed of smaller organs, layered with tissues composed of miniscule cells that house tiny organelles!
 
Prophet Muhammad  (peace be upon him) reminds us, “Do not belittle any good action, even if it be greeting your brother with a pleasant face,” (Muslim). Every action, down to the invisibly tiny atom, is significant with Allah (swt). It could be stroking the head of a sad child, or visiting someone who is sick, or giving $5 or $10 to the poor and needy, or lending a helping hand when someone needs you. And when you assist others in any way, know that Allah (swt) is helping you!
 
With your friends or loved ones, it could be the smallest acts of kindness that make the biggest difference: a comforting phone call during the day, a warm hug, a genuine smile that brightens their mood, or even doing the grocery shopping or washing the dishes after they’ve had a long day. Doing these loving, generous acts—and doing them often—is what fuels loving, intimate relationships. These are the seemingly insignificant day-to-day gestures that build solid, beautiful bonds.
 
Great health also comes with adopting small healthy habits. Allah (swt) created our bodies in the best form, so it behooves us to invest in honoring and taking care of that trust. Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) encourages us to increase our physical strength when he says, “The strong believer is better and more beloved to Allah than the weak believer,” (Muslim).
 
Remember what actions are most beloved to Allah?—the ones done consistently, even if they are small. In your relationship with Allah (swt), that means small doses of Qur’anic recitation, prayers and du`a’ (supplication) are better than large doses every once in a blue moon. A short du`a’ after every prayer is preferred over supplicating for a long time only when you’re having trouble and need Allah’s help. Reading five minutes of Qur’an daily and praying a few rak`as (units) ofqiyam (night prayer) before sleeping or before Fajr is better than doing these only when Ramadan rolls around.
 
 

What area in your life can you create more beauty, more greatness, and more success in? Pick one area and just start! Start with tiny changes and little adjustments that push you in the right direction. When you do the minor acts repeatedly and consistently, you create a series of successes for yourself. These small feats add up, and motivate you to challenge yourself—to give more, exercise more often, read Qur’an and pray more regularly, and do even more thoughtful acts for others. Before you know it, by Allah’s will, your life will be a big success made up of many smaller ones.

Just like our bodies are made up of millions of magnificent smaller entities, loving relationships are made up of numerous, loving acts of kindness, a healthy person practices a variety of healthy eating and exercise habits, and a righteous person is one who does many righteous acts. And don’t forget that every little bit counts. As Allah (swt) reminds us, “Whoever does an atom’s weight of good will see it,” (Qur’an, 99:7) and “Whatever good you do, Allah knows it,” (Qur’an, 2:197).

 

http://www.suhaibwebb.com/personaldvlpt/character/grandeur-in-the-miniscule/

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