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a well wisher  
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 13 March 2012 at 2:19pm
 

Spirituality and Health - Duke University

 
(About 16 mins)
 
 
 
Chaplain Bruce Feldstein, MD. is a hospital chaplain at Stanford Hospital and Clinics, and founder and director of The Jewish Chaplaincy at Stanford University School of Medicine. Hospital Chaplains are the members of the healthcare team whose primary role is to provide spiritual care.This workshop recognizes the importance of spirituality in healing and healthcare, and the role of the chaplain-interpreter partnership in providing spiritual care.
 
 
(About 6 mins)


Edited by a well wisher - 13 March 2012 at 2:20pm
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 19 March 2012 at 12:38am

Toward a Balanced and Healthy Life

Health and Islamic Philosophy

The Medical Benefits of the Articles of Faith

The first Article of Faith is belief in God. This belief in God means also belief in our health as a gift from Him, and our responsibility toward our body, because we do it for the pleasure of God so that we may serve Him better. We must understand that whatever God has prohibited us from doing it is only for our own benefit and not for His sake. Therefore, if He has told us in the Quran to avoid intoxicants like alcohol and meat like that of swine, only He fully knows of the medical harms of such prohibitions...

Recitation of Quran

The effect of the sound echoing during the recitation of the Quran and the meaning of the verses have a healing effect on the body and the mind. Different letters of Arabic when recited have echoing properties to different target organs in the body. It has been studied and determined that listening to the recitation of Quran reduces the heart rate, blood pressure and rate of respiration, and has a biofeedback-type tranquilizing effect.  A study has been published by Dr. Ahmed El-Kadi of Akbar Clinic in Panama, Florida. The physical activity in the Islamic prayer (salat) is mild, uniform and involve all muscles and joints...

Fasting

The third pillar of Islam is fasting in the month of Ramadan.

Fasting produces physiological change in the body, gives rest to different organs and improves adaptability.

It lowers the blood cholesterol, blood pressure and blood sugar. It produces peace and tranquility in the mind.

It is an institution in learning self-restraint...

http://www.onislam.net/english/reading-islam/research-studies/islamic-thought/456262-health-and-islamic-philosophy-.html

Think Win-Win for a better world for all...

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 21 March 2012 at 7:26am

The Sunna, Science and Prophetic Medicine - Sh.Hamza Yusuf

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fj3n0YU_OaI
 
(About 7 mins)
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 27 March 2012 at 7:34am

Science On Religion presents news and views relating to the scientific study of religion. We’re excited about new insight into religion, spirituality, and the endless forms of the human quest for meaning, and we think the sciences have many valuable insights to offer. We don’t speak for any particular religious viewpoint, and we don’t advocate for or against any theology or belief system.

Science On Religion takes religion seriously. We have no interest in trying to “explain away” God or spirituality. And we are not interested in pretending that religion is all peace and joy and light. In the very best spirit of science, we’re after the facts – about ritual, spirituality and health, human evolution, and any other subject that bears on the complex and fascinating topic of human religiousness. We’re interested in facts because, when it comes right down to it, we trust them.

In a sense, this blog is both an expression of faith in the value of science, and a show of confidence in the value of rigorous inquiry into spiritual and religious matters. Through our content, we’re making an important point: done critically and well, the study of religiousness through the lens of the social and biological sciences doesn’t need to lead to a decay or snuffing out of our collective spiritual life, however that is understood. In fact, by giving us more insight into what makes us human, it can only make that life more vibrant.

This blog includes two kinds of posts. The first is descriptions of scientific research studies along with explanations of their significance for making sense of everyday spirituality and religiosity. The second is opinion pieces about research trends, current controversies, and science-religion interactions. We invite you to weigh in with your own ideas in response to the news items and the opinion pieces.

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote flightdude Replybullet Posted: 31 March 2012 at 5:38pm
interesting topic.....i have been in healthcare for almost 30 years and i can tell you, without a doubt, that faith and healing are strongly linked. that is why itis important to visit the sick and pray with them.
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 03 April 2012 at 3:59pm
Assalaamualekum

Thank you for sharing that brother and for accentuating the need to visit the sick and to pray with them.Prayer alters outcomes and is not a passive act but an evolving one...All those working in healthcare should focus more on the spiritual needs of the patients and their families but I don't know why there is this awkward hesitancy to broach these matters.

Prayer On the Hospital Floor

What happens when the families of sick and dying hospitalized children ask their physicians to pray with them, or for them? How do pediatricians respond to such personal requests? While increasing numbers of physicians say that religion and spirituality help some patients and families cope with serious illness, a new study reports that it is almost always the families and patients who raise the issue of prayer, not the doctors themselves
 
In the current issue of Southern Medical Journal, Brandeis and Rice University sociologists report for the first time how physicians actually respond to personal requests for prayer. The study suggests that medical education could be enhanced by courses that address the topic of prayer, which is embedded in complex situations and is never as simple as praying or not.
 
 
 
Have you come across Dr. Larry Dossey's book The Healing Words?He mentions this study...

DR: You tell a striking story about a study in which prayer seemed to affect medical outcomes. What are the implications of that study?
 
LARRY DOSSEY: I'm not as enthusiastic about this study as I was when I first discovered it, but it's still worth mentioning. It was done by Randolph Byrd, in the cardiac care unit at the San Francisco General Hospital. It involved about 400 patients. Half were treated with routine standard care, as was the other half, but in addition the patients in the second half were prayed for. Their names were farmed out to various prayer groups.
The difference in the outcomes was really striking. For instance, there were no cardiac arrests or necessity to be put on an artificial ventilator in the prayed-for group, whereas there were twelve in the unprayed-for group. If this had been a new drug or surgical procedure being tested, it would have been hailed as a great therapeutic breakthrough.
Nobody among the nurses and doctors knew who was and who wasn't being prayed for, which prevented them from unconsciously giving preferential treatment to the prayed-for group. When the results were in, it appeared as if the group that was being prayed for was being slipped some kind of miracle drug. There were no deaths in the prayed-for group, while there were three deaths in the other group. Twelve people in the group not being prayed for had cardiac arrests and had to have CPR, or needed a mechanical ventilator, an artificial breathing machine. None of the prayed-for group had to have that done. Twelve to zero - those are pretty good odds. Most people don't read the Southern Medical Journal, where this was carried. But the late Dr.William Knowland, a physician who could always be depended on to weigh in and criticize any study smacked at all of the psychic, looked at this study and said, "This looks like an excellent study. I think it's going to stand up. It appears on the basis of this study that we physicians, when our patients are admitted to the emergency room and to the coronary care unit, in addition to our usual recommendations, should be writing orders that say "Pray for my patient three times daily.'"
 
Still, this wasn't the best study in the world. At a bare minimum, what you could say about the study is that it is very strongly suggestive that prayer has a phenomenal effect, that it has a life-and-death influence on people, even when they do not know they are being prayed for. This is good-old classic, Caycean action at a distance.
 
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Spiritual rejuvenation during Ramadan

Dr. Jamal Badawi talks about the laws of nature that requires every creation to undergo rejuvenation.

 
(About 6 mins)
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Neurotheology: This Is Your Brain On Religion

 

 Dr. Andrew Newberg has scanned the brains of praying nuns, chanting Sikhs and meditating Buddhists. He studies the relationship between the brain and religious experience, a field called neurotheology. And he's written a book, Principles of Neurotheology, that tries to lay the groundwork for a new kind of scientific and theological dialogue.

Newberg tells NPR's Neal Conan that neurotheology applies science and the scientific method to spirituality through brain imaging studies.

"[We] evaluate what's happening in people's brains when they are in a deep spiritual practice like meditation or prayer," Newberg says. He and his team then compare that with the same brains in a state of rest. "This has really given us a remarkable window into what it means for people to be religious or spiritual or to do these kinds of practices."

Newberg's scans have also shown the ways in which religious practices, like meditation, can help shape a brain. Newberg describes one study in which he worked with older individuals who were experiencing memory problems. Newberg took scans of their brains, then taught them a mantra-based type of meditation and asked them to practice that meditation 12 minutes a day for eight weeks. At the end of the eight weeks, they came back for another scan, and Newberg found some dramatic differences.

"We found some very significant and profound changes in their brain just at rest, particularly in the areas of the brain that help us to focus our mind and to focus our attention," he says.

According to Newberg, many of the participants related that they were thinking more clearly and were better able to remember things after eight weeks of meditation. Remarkably, the new scans and memory tests confirmed their claims.

"They had improvements of about 10 or 15 percent," Newberg says. "This is only after eight weeks at 12 minutes a day, so you can imagine what happens in people who are deeply religious and spiritual and are doing these practices for hours a day for years and years."

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Meditation & The Brain

Dr.Richard Davidson - Mind, Meditation and science. The benefits of meditation on the brain.

 
 
(2 mins)
 
 
John Rossiter-Thornton MD speaks to the Spirituality in Health-Care Network about the link between meditation and the brain
 
 
(6 mins)
 


Edited by a well wisher - 01 June 2012 at 7:47am
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 24 July 2012 at 5:03pm

Faith and Healing: A Forum

Three experts--the Rev. George Handzo, a chaplain with the HealthCare Chaplaincy of New York City; Dr. Andrew Newberg, a radiologist and psychiatrist at the University of Pennsylvania; and Dr. Richard Sloan, a psychiatrist at Columbia University--discuss the role that belief should play in science
 
 
(About 7 mins)
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 01 August 2012 at 9:56pm

Jon Kabat-Zinn, a pioneer of scientific research on meditation, lists the positive effects that meditation can have on the mind and body.

The Benefits of Meditation

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wjXXvtGEZQQ

(About 3 mins)

"Heartfulness"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6aaJtBKwK9U

(About 2 mins)

"Intimacy with Self"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_wuteOfv6k0

(About 1 mins)

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 05 November 2012 at 6:37am
 
 
Watch The Linguists, a documentary about two really smart men who travel across the world to record dying languages because they cannot save them. They feel, express and implore, we should have: We should have tried to preserve the many different ways in which people perceive the world, the means to translate disordered affairs into stories, philosophies and motivations. As the world becomes more and more alike, that is an impulse I wish more of us had, a regret we may in decades come to be pained by. But how can such great differences be preserved, let alone considered? Who will pay for their maintenance? Who will house them, protect them and, dare I suggest, advance them?

This all comes to mind because I'm reading Melanie Thernstrom's The Pain Chronicles. Thernstrom is a fantastic writer. Her descriptions of suffering, of agony and of torment are beautiful, horrible, surprising and captivating. It began with a day of unusually vigorous swimming, provoking a fierce and persistent pain. From there she explores her attitude to pain, her fear and distrust and confusion about it. She records how across history humans have sought to understand, accept and deal with pain. She talks about how modern medicine upended religion and ritual and set us on a new path toward pain not as mystery but as conquerable enemy.

Except her own pain, which would not be subdued. Acute pain, we're learning, is not the same as chronic pain. For me, it cuts a little too close to home. I've often faced a range of illnesses, a stream of assaults, finding new flaws in my prematurely aged body (I remember feeling old in high school and not thinking that particularly troubling) with calendrical regularity. So I can sympathize with the impulse to ask "why?" In the past (or, at least, not in her non-religious present), we might have asked: Is God punishing us? Elevating us? Purifying us?

Hating on me? I'll confess I've asked the same. When one is (comparatively) energetic, but then feels a decline, it takes longer to get back to normal. It is flummoxing. It is, after all, a message of mortality, and I imagine very few people either contemplate it extensively or have the courage to. But, as the great narratives that elevated the cosmos over the individual have given way, there is an aspect to pain that is especially terrifying. That is for me and for Thernstrom, when the body breaks down just because it does, and no doctors or specialists can tell you (or her or me) why it is that one system isn't working like it should. Like it did.

Thernstrom explores the different ways in which the world's peoples perceived pain, and how pain was often at the core of piety. Often, pain was redemptive, transcendent -- it marked an opportunity for improvement or potential for salvation. So it is too bad that she barely talks about Islam. Doesn't Islam, its texts and histories, have something unique to add? At one point, she quotes from the Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him), but in the footnotes we find the reference is from Donald Meichenbaum's Cognitive-Behavior Modification. Somehow, I imagine, she could have done better. Muslims feature twice in the index, the last Prophet of Islam just that once and Islam not at all.

Thernstrom presumes the empirical attitude was born with Western science, and emerged against religion -- prior to the 1700s, there was almost no attempt to systemically understand the world outside us -- in part because she's only looking in one place. Can we, in this day and age, set out to write a story about the science and spirituality of suffering and not include a serious perspective on the lived culture of a huge number of the world's inhabitants? Are we still writing as if our narrative is the narrative of Judeo-Christian tradition? (Mostly the latter). But is it her fault? Where would she turn? Should she know to do so? I see the fault, but do not know where it begins.

Her very rich, and all the same very enjoyable title, lacks a perspective that could have tempered or challenged many of her conclusions. Muslim scientists pursued advances in math, chemistry, neurology, immunology, optics, opthalmology, physics, architecture, agriculture and myriad other fields. Their mentality cannot be assumed to mimic Western empiricism, but nevertheless one could fairly make the case that Islam's burst of creative inspiration helped feed Europe's revival. Of course, Islam was not, in and of itself, only on Earth to prepare the ground for another civilization. But cultures, like bodies, are interconnected systems. Too often we have refused to learn that when one part of the world is in pain, others are forced to share the misery. (The leg bone is connected to the hip bone...)

And this is why we must do more to preserve the contributions and perspectives of other religions and philosophies. By "we," I mean those of us in the humanities, if the humanities haven't been fatally undone by coldly economic utility. But I also speak to Muslims (these days, I suppose, I also have no choice but to speak for Muslims). We must make sure our heritage does not go missing from the wonderful histories of ideas, concepts and emotions of which The Pain Chronicles is one very excellent example. Because, at the heart of it, Melanie Thernstrom is asking a question about suffering -- an existential concern that is, not surprisingly, individualized. She and I are products of a time when individuality is far different even from what it was when our country was born.

We process pain through the lens of our self-perception.

How did empiricism exist without romanticism? Science without modernity? But they did, and perhaps we can mend some rifts by understanding how.

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Faith and The Brain: Newberg Interview

PBS Religion and Ethics Weekly story on Faith and the Brain: Scientists have long found an association between relaxation and health. Now there is growing evidence that spiritual practices have a beneficial and measurable effect on the brain. In his book “How God Changes Your Brain,” Andrew Newberg reports that meditation improves memory and reduces stress, and how you view God can affect the structure of your brain. Lucky Severson has the story.

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Dignity of Death and Palliative Care

Our life is sacred from conception to death. Sacred is also the dead who lived among us. The life and dignity of every person must be respected and protected at every stage and in every condition. As with life, one of the most fundamental human rights is the opportunity to have a decent death.

Palliative Care

This is where palliative care (from the Latin ‘palliare’ or ‘to cloak’) comes in; it focuses on the relief of pain and other symptoms and problems experienced in serious illnesses, with care and respect. The goal of palliative care is to improve the quality of life, by giving comfort and providing a support system to the person who is ill and also to those close to the patient. Palliative care can neither hasten nor prolong death. The World Health Organisation describes palliative care as “an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problems associated with life-threatening illness, through the prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification and impeccable assessment and treatment of pain and other problems, physical, psychosocial and spiritual.”

Our life consists of body, mind and soul; so, there is a need for physical, emotional and spiritual care. Religions tend to deal with birth and death well; as such, religious communities are generally well-equipped to deal with palliative care with an emphasis on spiritual care. Institutional religions encourage their adherents to often remember death so that they can live a righteous and spiritually enriched life. According to the three Abrahamic faiths death is not the end of life, it is a new phase of an eternal journey. With strong moral and spiritual guidelines to look after the old and frail the religious adherents try to overcome the fear factor concerning death; they tend to use the network of extended families and religious institutions.

Spiritual care should thus be provided on palliative care to those who need it. Awareness of patient beliefs could be very helpful to the care providers; it creates a staff-patient-family relationship. Although still patchy, spiritual care in the NHS is now accepted as an important ingredient in palliative care in the UK. Judaism, Christianity, Islam and other faiths have valued this enormously and are working with the health service to provide a more effective care plan.

The focus on a patient’s quality of life has significantly increased in recent decades, albeit with emphasis on physical and psychological support. It is vital no community is left out from access to high quality terminal care. It is also important spiritual well being is linked with good health.

Understanding patient narratives of what constitutes a peaceful death is critical for palliative care. For this to happen doctors, nurses, and other health professionals should have basic training on spiritual care; recruitment of staff from a broad range of ethnic, religious and cultural backgrounds is also important. We need a palliative care that is universal and where all can fit in.

 http://www.amanaparenting.com/?p=564

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