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Al-Cordoby  
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 02 June 2010 at 4:33pm
When a man and a woman witness an accident or a crime which involves violence, the woman is more likely to turn her sight away from the incident

Is this a correct assumption?


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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 02 June 2010 at 10:47pm
Yes I think your assumption is correct...
 
I can answer this question according to my experience/understanding...Others may share if their experiences are somewhat different...
 
I am personally quite averse to violence - let alone an accident or a crime but even very graphic violent shows on TV or video games make me uncomfortable...It's quite a disturbing trend to see violence creep into everyday life through media ...so many people are getting desensitized as they view it on a regular basis ..but it is still interesting to note that such violent games are more popular with boys and not girls for some reason.
 
So both nature and nurture again has a role  in this scenario ...an example I can give is when I was a med student and went to Anatomy Dissection for the first time, I nearly fainted :)Thats again a vasovagal syncope response which is more common in women  and can be triggered by fear....But later I ended up enjoying surgery and in my free time I use to observe neuro/spinal operations that last for several hours sometimes and are pretty gruesome so I guess my brain just adjusted...
 
A scientific basis, I think, from my understanding of why women have a lower threshold for violence is that they have more empathizing tendencies and literally can feel the others' pain...so they avoid it if possible...
 
 
 


Edited by a well wisher - 17 August 2014 at 10:55pm
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote searching Replybullet Posted: 04 June 2010 at 3:34pm
I haven't really read through this topic much yet but I do plan to. Something that stopped me was that when I tried to watch the video that was in the original post, I couldn't. YouTube had a message that it was removed due to a terms of use violation. Is there anywhere else that I could view this? Many of the replies were based on this video. Thanks. :)
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 05 June 2010 at 1:34am
This link has 5 minutes from the show:

http://videosift.com/video/Tale-of-Two-Brains
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 13 June 2010 at 12:50am
Testosterone Directly Amplifies but Does Not Program Male Behaviors

ScienceDaily (May 3, 2010) — New research uncovers some surprising information about how sex hormones control masculinization of the brain during development and drive gender related behaviors in adult males. The study, published in the April 29 issue of the journal Neuron, demonstrates that direct action of testosterone, the prototypical male hormone, is unnecessary for masculinizing the brain and behavior.

Testosterone and estrogen are thought to play an essential role in organizing and activating gender-specific patterns of behavior in sexually reproducing animals. Testosterone is produced by the testes and directly activates the androgen receptor (AR) in target tissues such as muscle. Estrogen is produced by the ovaries and is nearly undetectable in the circulation of males of most species. However, circulating testosterone in males can be converted into estrogen in the brain, and this testosterone-derived estrogen has been shown to control many male behaviors.

"It was known that testosterone and estrogen are essential for typical male behaviors in many vertebrate species," explains the study's senior author, Dr. Nirao M. Shah from the Department of Anatomy at the University of California, San Francisco. "However, how these two hormones interact to control masculinization of the brain and behavior remained to be established." ...

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/04/100428142246.htm
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 16 June 2010 at 6:58pm

Male desire to be strong and protect family key to preventing suicides: study

(PhysOrg.com) -- Masculine ideals of strength coupled with strong family ties can help men combat depression and overcome thoughts of suicide, according to University of British Columbia research.

In a study to appear in a forthcoming issue of Social Science and Medicine, UBC researchers John Oliffe and John Ogrodniczuk looked at how men’s ideas of masculinity served or hindered them during bouts of severe depression. Their findings shed light on risk factors and prevention strategies for suicide.

The authors analyzed qualitative data from interviews with 38 men between 24 and 50 years of age living in Vancouver and Prince George. The participants were self-identified or were formally diagnosed with depression.

The study suggests that men can best counter suicidal thoughts by connecting with others - namely intimate partners and family - to regain some stability and to secure emotional support from others.

“Support from friends and connecting to other things including spirituality is often the conduit to men seeking professional help to overcome the suicidal thoughts that can accompany severe depression” says lead author Oliffe, an associate professor in the School of Nursing.

Men die by suicide at least three times more than women although it is women who are diagnosed at twice the rate of men for depression. Men aged 20-29 have the highest rate of suicide. Statistics Canada reports that in 2003, the last year for which data is available, more than 2,900 men committed suicide.

The investigators found that most study participants expressed a strong commitment to their families and turned away from suicide for the hurt and trauma it would cause loved ones.

“Here, men’s strong sense of masculine roles and responsibility as a provider and protector enables men to hold on while seeking support to regain some self-control,” says Oliffe.

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote musicworld1 Replybullet Posted: 18 June 2010 at 2:21am
thats nice and beautiful and working.
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 26 June 2010 at 4:11am
How the Brain Encodes Reward

A talk last year at MIT by a Japanese specialist on how the human brain encodes reward

Hikosaka describes research demonstrating that certain dopamine neurons become excited if a visual cue indicates a future reward, and become inhibited with a visual cue indicating no reward. Dopamine also increases after an action delivers a reward and decreases when an action produces no reward. Research began to explore whether dopamine neurons “encode motivational values, including reward and punishment.” After others’ studies yielded contradictory or uncertain conclusions, Hikosaka designed a set of studies on monkeys involving classical Pavlovian conditioning, with juice rewards and air puffs as aversive stimuli.

Among Hikosaka’s findings: some dopamine neurons were excited primarily by positive, reward-predicting stimuli, others inhibited by air puff-predicting stimuli. But he also found another group of dopamine neurons excited both by positive and negative reward-predicting stimuli (as well as the stimuli themselves). Hikosaka posited two types of neurons that react in very different ways to motivational signals, which he described as value-coding and salience-coding. He also determined that the lateral habenula, a part of the brain sitting at one end of the thalamus, seems to regulate dopamine pathways involved in some motivational responses. By sending a weak electric pulse through the lateral habenula, Hikosaka saw a very strong inhibition of the dopamine neurons that “encode mostly motivational values.”

http://mitworld.mit.edu/video/701

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 06 July 2010 at 8:19pm


Talk Therapy Can Be Potent Medicine

 
And unlike medications for depression, which take weeks to become effective while symptoms abate gradually, her immediate reaction to psychotherapy speaks to a different mechanism of action and confirms what neuroscientists are demonstrating: social interactions, including psychotherapy, turn on brain circuits instantaneously. Why? Because humans are social animals; we’re wired to connect.

Neurons in the premotor cortex and the somatosensory cortex — mirror neurons, as they’re known — fire in synchrony with the behavior and feelings of others, attuning people’s brains. When a person sees someone smiling, some of the observer’s smile-controlling neurons are turned on, too. Or when someone winces in pain, the corresponding sensory neurons in the observer fire away in sympathy.

The premotor cortex, command central with respect to voluntary behaviors, is where decisions to act are made. Evolutionarily, it’s a tremendous advantage to learn coping through observation and imitation — mirror neurons’ raison d’être — whether learning to harness fire to deal with the elements, or learning to self-regulate, self-soothe or self-reflect, or any of the other myriad coping skills that modulate mood.

Think of how it feels for the depressed person, whose pervading negativism colors his or her thoughts, feelings and behavior, to be with an optimistic, yet not Pollyannaish, person who radiates confidence, warmth and humor while affirming that situations can be interpreted differently; how refreshing and hope-engendering it is to be with someone who not only understands one’s misery but says something that makes a difference.

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 20 July 2010 at 4:31pm
First Concrete Evidence That Women Are Better Multitaskers Than Men

ScienceDaily (July 19, 2010) — Professor Keith Laws at the University's School of Psychology looked at multitasking in 50 male and 50 female undergraduates and found that although the sexes performed equally when they multitasked on simple maths and map reading tasks, women far excelled men when it came to planning how to search for a lost key, with 70 per cent of women performing better than their average male counterparts.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100719083042.htm


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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 21 July 2010 at 4:39pm
 
Gender Differences in Communication
 
In any study of communication, there is variability in what is meant by "communication". Some individuals may consider only the verbal attributes whereas yet others will consider nonverbal interactions -- and the smart will focus on both.  In this discussion, both verbal and nonverbal aspects of communication will be considered.

What then is gender communication? Several have used the term to signify the differences in communication due to biology and others use it to represent differences resulting from social, psychological and cultural interactions. For most researchers gender communication focuses on the expressions used by one gender in the relationships and roles between people. The existence of a difference in gender communication has been a topic of interest for decades with generalizations being made between the sexes. Most published work on gender differences are believed to fall into 2 categories of bias: alpha where the difference is exaggerated or beta which presumes that there are few if any differences between the sexes (Canary & Dindia, 1992). The bias approach adopts the view that "similarities rather than differences characterize men and women" and that while "some noteworthy differences between men and women exist, when both within-and between-gender comparisons are made; the similarities are as important--if not more important--than the differences" (Canary & Dindia, 1992)).

Nonverbal communication refers to those actions that are distinct from speech. Thus nonverbal communication includes facial expression, hand and arm movement, posture, position and other movements of the body, legs or feet (Mehrabian, 2007). Nonverbal communication or body language has been consistently shown to be different in the two sexes (Glass, 1992).

Women are considered to be more nonverbally warmer than men with a tendency to smile and lean toward others during conversation. Women also use a pleasant warm voice in conversation that is not characteristic of conversations between men (Eckes, 2000). Differences have also been noted with respect to the gestures used while speaking. Men are observed to use straight and sharp movements, while women tend to have more fluid movement. In terms of posture, women tend to keep arms next to their bodies and cross their legs while men often have an open wider posture -- arms away from the body and legs apart.

Another difference lies in visual dominance, with men being considered to be more visually dominant than women. Visual dominance is defined as the ratio of the time spent maintaining eye contact while talking to the time spent maintaining eye contact while listening (Eckes, 2000). Of course, one needs to take into account that women have wider peripheral vision allowing them to give the impression they are looking in one direction while actually looking in another direction.

In communication men tend to sit other side-by-side next to each or stand at some distance. Women sit face-to-face with other women or stand closer, indicating a more open and intimate position that help them connect with one another. For men, a face-to-face position indicates challenge or confrontation.

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 29 December 2010 at 3:51pm

Why We Fight: Men Check out in Stressful Situations, While Women Show Increased Brain Coordination When Looking at Angry Faces

ScienceDaily (Sep. 28, 2010) — A new study by USC researchers reveals that stressed men looking at angry faces had diminished activity in the brain regions responsible for understanding others' feelings.

Turns out the silent and stoic response to stress might be a guy thing after all.

"These are the first findings to indicate that sex differences in the effects of stress on social behavior extend to one of the most basic social transactions -- processing someone else's facial expression," said Mara Mather, director of the Emotion and Cognition Lab at USC.

In an article appearing the October 6 issue of the journal NeuroReport, Mather and her coauthors present a series of tests indicating that, under acute stress, men had less brain response to facial expressions, in particular, fear and anger.

In both men and women, looking at pictures of faces caused activity in the part of the brain used in basic visual processing (the "fusiform face area") and in parts of the brain used for interpreting and understanding facial expressions.

However, men under acute stress showed decreased activity not only in the fusiform face area but also decreased coordination among parts of the brain that help us interpret what emotions these faces are conveying.

In a marked sex difference, women under stress showed the opposite -- women under stress had increased activity in the fusiform face area and increased coordination among the regions of the brain used in interpreting facial emotions compared to the control group.

"The study indicates that experiencing acute stress can affect subsequent activity and interactions in brain regions in opposite ways for males and females," said Mather, associate professor of gerontology and psychology in the USC Davis School of Gerontology and the USC College of Letters, Arts and Sciences.

"Under stress, men tend to withdraw socially while women seek emotional support," Mather said.

Prior research has shown the crucial role of the insula in helping us simulate the experiences of others, while the temporal pole has been shown to be important for understanding the emotions of others. Both are part of a known circuit -- along with the inferior frontal region and the amygdala -- that contribute to empathy and social understanding.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100928135056.htm
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 07 January 2011 at 1:46pm

Understanding Women

A short comedy video by Baba Ali with advice for men to better understand women

The difference between men and women when they are stressed is that men prefer to be left on their own in order to find time to solve their problems, whereas women like to speak about their problems and for their husband to listen.

For women, "listening" means showing empathy, not throwing out solutions. Don't interrupt with solutions, just "listen" !!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G570gqxhyU0

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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Squeegie Replybullet Posted: 07 January 2011 at 10:19pm
So true. I can come out and explain that a nuclear blast has just happened in the back room. My hubby, with three semesters of seminary and a counseling degree under his belt, could give me an answer to the problem in the back room, but if he does so before hearing me out, there's as likely to be a nuclear blast in the living room as well.
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