Hall of FameHall of Fame  Active TopicsActive Topics  Display List of Forum MembersMemberlist  Search The ForumSearch  HelpHelp  chatChat
  RegisterRegister  LoginLogin
Current Events
 Whyislam.org Forums : General : Current Events
Message Icon Topic: Should Today be called "World Hunger Day"?! Post Reply Post New Topic
Page  of 4 Next >>
Author Message
a well wisher  
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar
Religion: Islam(Muslim)
Posts: 8391
Forum Rating: 0
Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Topic: Should Today be called "World Hunger Day"?!
    Posted: 16 October 2009 at 1:50pm

Take a look at the picture and multiply it by one billion.

That’s the worldwide figure of people going hungry according to the latest UN Food Agencies report

“We should be calling this world hunger day, not world food day,” says Emilia Casella from the World Food Programme.

Today, ActionAid came out with a report which praises Brazil and China for its efforts to combat hunger but criticises India.  

There’s lots of talk about genetic engineering being the answer. But does this solution push the boundaries of mother nature too far? India’s debating this now.

Is the solution entirely in the hands of agricultural investment? Not according to this blogger who believes hunger is a moral consequence of greed. What about the academics and agencies researching into the crisis? Not working says Gebisa Ejeta ”Far too many research results are sitting on the shelf,” he said. Gebisa is scheduled to receive the World Food Prize for his work on combating a weed that infests many crops in Africa. Does a solution to hunger need to be home grown?

There’s plenty of food in the world says Louis Belanger from Oxfam. But the UN insist that food production will have to increase by 70% over the next forty years to feed the world’s population. It’s a grim prediction – do this or face famine by 2050.



Edited by a well wisher - 16 October 2009 at 1:54pm
La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah
No Guest-Voting   IP IP Logged
Al-Cordoby  
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar
Moderator
Religion: Islam(Muslim)
Posts: 27702
Forum Rating: 159
Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 17 October 2009 at 1:14am
This Friday's speech I attended was actually about this topic, and the danger hunger has on humanity, from an Islamic point of view
 
I agree with the opinion that (hunger is a moral consequence of greed) and I would add that there is on one hand a problem of distribution of food supplies to the poor, and on the other hand a problem of massive waste of food in certain classes of society around the world
 
If these 2 problems can be addressed in an efficient manner, based on compassion and human solidarity irrespective of faith, race or nationality, a lot can be done to improve the current sad situation
 
The human race is today more than ever sll in the same boat as in the global economy of today there is a heavy social price paid for the actions of greedy corporations. In addition to the virtues of mercy human compassion, it is in the best interest of all passengers on the boat from a practical point of view to solve this serious crisis in an efficient and caring way
 
 
Think Win-Win for a better world for all...

My Blog
Muslim Heritage

No Guest-Voting   IP IP Logged
a well wisher  
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar
Religion: Islam(Muslim)
Posts: 8391
Forum Rating: 0
Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 17 October 2009 at 1:40am
Couldnt agree more...
 
The litmus test of our faith is to move from compassion towards justice for all...we have to cross that bridge...Human unity is not something we are called upon to create, only to recognize.
 
 
La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah
No Guest-Voting   IP IP Logged
a well wisher  
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar
Religion: Islam(Muslim)
Posts: 8391
Forum Rating: 0
Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 16 October 2010 at 3:24pm

This World Food Day, help us rewrite
the story of malnutrition for 195 million children

On June 2, we partnered with VII Photo to launch Starved for Attention, an international campaign on the crisis of childhood malnutrition. An estimated 195 million children worldwide suffer from the effects of malnutrition.

But right now, the world’s top food aid donors, including the United States, Canada, Japan, and the European Union, continue to supply and finance nutritionally substandard foods to developing countries, despite conclusive scientific evidence of their ineffectiveness in reducing childhood malnutrition.

The vast majority of childhood nutrition programs in developing countries that are supported by international food assistance rely almost exclusively on fortified blended flours such as corn- and soy-blend (CSB) cereals. CSB cereals do not meet international standards for the nutritional needs of children less than two years of age.

In light of World Food Day tomorrow, October 16th, we have sent an open letter to U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, USAID Administrator Rajiv Shah, and U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack calling on them to stop supplying nutritionally substandard food to malnourished children in developing countries.

Join our call.  Sign the petition and add your name with over 50,000 others around the world demanding that governments supplying food aid stop providing substandard foods for children.

Thank you for your support.  

 
 

http://www.starvedforattention.org/_inc/en/files/Petition.pdf

La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah
No Guest-Voting   IP IP Logged
a well wisher  
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar
Religion: Islam(Muslim)
Posts: 8391
Forum Rating: 0
Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 16 October 2010 at 3:38pm

50 Percent of Food is Wasted Causing Water, Food and Hunger Crisis, Says SIWI, FAO and IWMI

To meet the challenge of feeding growing populations and the global hungry, massive reductions in the amount of food wasted after production are needed. The Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI), the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the International Water Management Institute (IWMI) released on Thursday, August 21, a policy brief “Saving Water: From Field to Fork – Curbing Losses and Wastage in the Food Chain,” that calls on governments to reduce by half, by 2025, the amount of food that is wasted after it is grown and outlines attainable steps for this be achieved.

Tossed Food: Like Leaving the Tap Running
Tremendous quantities of food are discarded in processing, transport, supermarkets and people’s kitchens. This wasted food is also wasted water. In the US, for instance, as much as 30 percent of food, worth some USD 48.3 billion, is thrown away. That’s like leaving the tap running and pouring 40 trillion litres of water into the garbage can - enough water to meet the household needs of 500 million people. Through international trade, savings in one country might benefit communities in other parts of the world.   

 
Researchers at the University of Texas, Austin say that points to a painless way to save energy: stop wasting food.

 
According to a new study in the Journal of Environmental Science and Technology, food waste and the energy required to produce it, represent an unrecognized opportunity to conserve energy and reduce climate changing emissions.

Scientists at the Center for International Energy and Environmental Policy set out to answer three questions about the relationship between food and energy use: how much energy is in food, how much food is wasted and how much energy is in the wasted food.

Wasting energy

Michael Webber, the center's associate director and co-author of the study, says between eight and 16 percent of U.S. energy consumption is tied up in food production, transportation, preservation and disposal. "And then we throw away at least a quarter of that food. Some people say even 50 percent." Americans spend on food has declined in relative terms for decades. And, because food is so abundant and cheap, Americans are not as concerned about tossing it out.

Americans waste more energy in the food they throw away, than Switzerland or Sweden consume in a year. So, Webber and his colleagues calculated how much energy was needed to produce the trashed food. "We found that there's at least two percent of the nation's energy consumption is embedded in food we throw away. And that ends up being a pretty big number because of how much energy we consume overall as a nation."

Putting brakes on food waste

Two percent is more energy than Switzerland or Sweden consume in a year and the equivalent of about 350 million barrels of oil.

USDA
During World War I, signs like this encouraged Americans to conserve food.

Webber's study suggests that putting the brakes on food waste would be good for the planet and the pocketbook. "It might reduce our emissions. It might reduce our environmental impacts. We just have to find a way to do it so that it is affordable as well. It might be we save money because we are wasting less money on food we don't eat."  

Webber says that the study is based on old data badly that needs to be revised.  But still he says the
numbers are good enough to make a point: food waste is a waste of energy. "I think the next step for us at a research level is to get a better sense of what's going on, get better data, get better scientific analysis. At the same time perhaps we could consider some policy options to reduce the waste."

According to the study, the most wasted foods were fats and oils, dairy products, grains, eggs, fruits and vegetables.


 
La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah
No Guest-Voting   IP IP Logged
Francophile  
Undergraduate
Undergraduate

Religion: Agnostic(Agnostic)
Posts: 1370
Forum Rating: 0
Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Francophile Replybullet Posted: 16 October 2010 at 5:47pm
I think that all solvent political entities should co-operate in solving this problem, not that there is any chance this will happen.
 
But it is irresponsible to present this issue without dealing with lack of birth control in the afflicted areas.
No Guest-Voting   IP IP Logged
a well wisher  
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar
Religion: Islam(Muslim)
Posts: 8391
Forum Rating: 0
Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 22 October 2010 at 4:06pm
Hello Sister Lin
 
 
Overpopulation is a relative term. Over with respect to what? Food? Resources?  From 1900 to 2000, world population grew from 1.6 billion persons to 6.1 billion. However, while world population increased close to 4 times, world real gross domestic product increased 20 to 40 times.
 
Various studies have proved that poverty and underdevelopment has no direct link to population growth per se. The causes of underdevelopment can be both internal and external. Internal causes may include poor political and economic administration, widespread corruption, excessive military budgets combined with inadequate spending on health and education, fratricidal wars, defective markets, entrepreneurial freedom erroneously understood as the right to the unbridled pursuit of profit, violations of the principle of subsidiarity, cultural-historical factors that define norms of behaviour inimical to the pursuit of integral development.. Approximately 80% of all Third World agricultural land is owned by 3% of landowners.Externally, less developed nations can be the victims of an inequitable distribution of the world's resources as well as of international trade and financial arrangements, which work against them. Poor countries are often over-burdened by foreign debt and unable to gain affordable access to the technology they need to further the development process. Problems such as these can only be eradicated through the pursuit of social justice, which will enable integral development to occur.
 
The world produces more than enough food for everybody....So the basic reason people (including so many children) are starving to death is not because there are too many people and too little food. The basic reason is just that those with so much food are simply unwilling to share it with those who don’t have enough.To put it simply, the hungry are hungry because they are excluded from the land or cannot earn enough to survive and not because of a natural limit to the amount of food that can be produced. 
 
The real central problem when it comes to hunger and starvation in the world is the system which determines the way that wealth is so unequally distributed among people. i.e., capitalism (or, looking at it on a world scale, capitalist-imperialism).
 
The reasons for the jump in birth rates in poor countries in the 20th century were primarily better health conditions, without accompanying economic opportunities....According to the UN, the total fertility rate (TFR) for the world as a whole was 4.49 in 1970-75, but fell to 2.65 in 2000-2005. Its a fact that birth rates are now rapidly falling almost everywhere, including in most third world countries, while starvation is nevertheless increasing. It is true that the populations in Brazil, China, and much of the world are still growing despite the low (and falling) TFRs. This is because of the still abnormally large number of women of child-bearing age because of the population explosion of the 20th century.

The correction to the population explosion is already in place, though it will still take 2 or 3 more decades to fully come into effect in some parts of the world. From about 2035-40 on, the world will be losing population. Many advanced countries (especially in Europe and Japan) are already losing population every year, and many of them are trying (quite unsuccessfully) to reverse this. There are today a number of countries in Africa where the population is actually falling (mostly because of HIV/AIDS) but where many people are also starving to death.

 
This is a relatively old but interesting article...
 

Why So Much Hunger? Based on the book "World Hunger: 12 Myths" 

 
 

 
La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah
No Guest-Voting   IP IP Logged
a well wisher  
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar
Religion: Islam(Muslim)
Posts: 8391
Forum Rating: 0
Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 22 October 2010 at 4:10pm

The world produces enough food to feed everyone. World agriculture produces 17 percent more calories per person today than it did 30 years ago, despite a 70 percent population increase.  The principal problem is that many people in the world do not have sufficient land to grow, or income to purchase, enough food. 

What are the causes of hunger?

This is a fundamental question, with varied answers. 

Poverty is the principal cause of hunger. The causes of poverty include poor people's lack of resources, an extremely unequal income distribution in the world and within specific countries, conflict, and hunger itself. As of 2008 (2005 statistics), the World Bank has estimated that there were an estimated 1,345 million poor people in developing countries who live on $1.25 a day or less.3 This compares to the later FAO estimate of  1.02 billion undernourished people.  Extreme poverty remains an alarming problem in the world’s developing regions, despite some progress that reduced "dollar--now $1.25-- a day" poverty from (an estimated) 1900 million people in 1981, a reduction of 29 percent over the period. Progress in poverty reduction has been concentrated in Asia, and especially, East Asia, with the major improvement occurring in China. In Sub-Saharan Africa, the number of people in extreme poverty has increased.  The statement that 'poverty is the principal cause of hunger'  is, though correct, unsatisfying.  Why then are (so many) people poor? 

Harmful economic systems are the principal cause of poverty and hunger. Hunger Notes believes that the principal underlying cause of poverty and hunger is the ordinary operation of the economic and political systems in the world. Essentially control over resources and income is based on military, political and economic power that typically ends up in the hands of a minority, who live well, while those at the bottom barely survive, if they do. We have described the operation of this system in more detail in our special section on Harmful economic systems. 

Conflict as a cause of hunger and poverty. At the end of 2005, the global number of refugees was at its lowest level in almost a quarter of a century. Despite some large-scale repatriation movements, the last three years have witnessed a significant increase in refugee numbers, due primarily to the violence taking place in Iraq and Somalia. By the end of 2008, the total number of refugees under UNHCR’s mandate exceeded 10 million. The number of conflict-induced internally displaced persons (IDPs) reached some 26 million worldwide at the end of the year . Providing exact figures on the number of stateless people is extremely difficult  But, important, (relatively) visible though it is, and anguishing for those involved conflict is less important as poverty (and its causes) as a cause of hunger. (Using the statistics above 1.02 billion people suffer from chronic hunger while 36 million people are displaced [UNHCR 2008])

Hunger is also a cause of poverty. By causing poor health, low levels of energy, and even mental impairment, hunger can lead to even greater poverty by reducing people's ability to work and learn.

Climate change- Climate change is increasingly viewed as a current and future cause of hunger and poverty. Increasing drought, flooding, and changing climatic patterns requiring a shift in crops and farming practices that may not be easily accomplished are three key issues.

Progress in reducing the number of hungry people. The target set at the 1996 World Food Summit was to halve the number of undernourished people by 2015 from their number in 1990-92. (FAO uses three year averages in its calculation of undernourished people.) The (estimated) number of undernourished people in developing countries  was 824 million in 1990-92. In 2009, the number had climbed to 1.02 billion people.  The WFS goal is a global goal adopted by the nations of the world; the present outcome indicates how marginal the efforts were in face of the real need.
So, overall,  the world is not making progress toward the world food summit goal, although there has been progress in Asia, and in Latin America and the Caribbean

http://www.worldhunger.org/articles/Learn/world%20hunger%20facts%202002.htm

  • Consider the global priorities in spending in 1998

    Global Priority $U.S. Billions
    Cosmetics in the United States 8
    Ice cream in Europe 11
    Perfumes in Europe and the United States 12
    Pet foods in Europe and the United States 17
    Business entertainment in Japan 35
    Cigarettes in Europe 50
    Alcoholic drinks in Europe 105
    Narcotics drugs in the world 400
    Military spending in the world 780

    And compare that to what was estimated as additional costs to achieve universal access to basic social services in all developing countries:

    Global Priority $U.S. Billions
    Basic education for all 6
    Water and sanitation for all 9
    Reproductive health for all women 12
    Basic health and nutrition 13

    Source 31

  •  

    http://www.globalissues.org/article/26/poverty-facts-and-stats

    La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah
    No Guest-Voting   IP IP Logged
    a well wisher  
    Admin Group
    Admin Group
    Avatar
    Religion: Islam(Muslim)
    Posts: 8391
    Forum Rating: 0
    Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 06 November 2010 at 7:56pm
    I think Gates Foundation was mentioned on one of the threads...
     
    The Food Crisis is Not About a Food Shortage

    Despite what we hope are the best intentions of the Gates Foundation, a New Green Revolution based on genetically engineered crops, imported fertilizer and government imposed agricultural policy will not feed the world. Women, not Monsanto, feed most of the worlds population, and the greatest portion of the worlds diet still relies on crops and farming systems developed and cultivated by the indigenous for centuries, systems that still work, systems that offer real promise.

     The report of 400 experts from around the world, The International Assessment of Agricultural Science and Technology for Development, is ignored by the proponents of a New Green Revolution, precisely because it shows that the best hope for ending hunger lies with local, traditional, farmer controlled agricultural production, not high tech industrial agriculture.

     To feed the world, fair methods of land distribution must be considered. A fair and just food system depends on small holder farmers having access to land. The function of a just farming system is to insure that everyone gets to eat, industrial agriculture functions to insure those corporations controlling the system make a profit.

     The ultimate cause of hunger is not a lack of Western agricultural technology, rather hunger results when people are not allowed to participate in a food system of their choosing. Civil wars, structural adjustment policies, inadequate distribution systems, international commodity speculation and corporate control of food from seed to table--- these are the causes of hunger, the stimulus for food crises.

    If the Gates Foundation is serious about ending hunger in Africa, they need to read the IAASTD report, not Monsanto's quarterly profit report. Then they can decide how their money might best be spent.

    La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah
    No Guest-Voting   IP IP Logged
    a well wisher  
    Admin Group
    Admin Group
    Avatar
    Religion: Islam(Muslim)
    Posts: 8391
    Forum Rating: 0
    Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 11 November 2010 at 11:55am

    TEDxKarachi - Jacqueline Novogratz - Investing in Patient Capital

     
    Jacqueline Novogratz is the founder and CEO of Acumen Fund, a non-profit global venture fund that uses entrepreneurial approaches to solve the problems of global poverty. Acumen Fund invests patient capital to identify, strengthen and scale business models that effectively serve the poor and champions this approach as an effective complement to traditional aid. Jacueline takes the TEDxKarachi stage to talk about Patient Capital Investing in Pakistan.
     
     
    (About 24 mins)
    La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah
    No Guest-Voting   IP IP Logged
    keithnurse  
    Senior Member
    Senior Member
    Avatar
    Location: United States
    Religion: Other(Other)
    Posts: 840
    Forum Rating: 0
    Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote keithnurse Replybullet Posted: 12 November 2010 at 6:29pm
    Shame on the corrumpt political leaders of poor nations who use food aid from wealthier nations to feed their military first and leave only scraps for the common people. 
    Unitarian Universalist
    www.uua.org
    No Guest-Voting   IP IP Logged
    a well wisher  
    Admin Group
    Admin Group
    Avatar
    Religion: Islam(Muslim)
    Posts: 8391
    Forum Rating: 0
    Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 13 December 2010 at 3:14pm
    We cannot take self accountability out of the equation.Aid doesn't address the cause of the suffering; it attempts to put a band-aid on a much larger wound...Any aid from the industrialized world—food, money, medicine, etc  increases the Third World dependence on industry, decreases their ability to be self-sufficient, and it increases the profit of the exploiter(s). When a community is “empowered” it can better reach its real goals which relate to material benefits.
     
     
    Humanitarian response to poverty is a quick fix and not a lasting solution... Development is not just change, it is sustained change.  It is the confidence that when the outsiders have left, when the foreign experts are working with a different community, when the donors have refused repeat funding because of the global financial meltdown, when the journalists are covering a different story, change remains...Progress depends on poor and marginalized communities to take power in their own hands, through better organization, education, and a more strategic vision for their future....The real help is when people come forward to break dependency...This is a very interesting interview with the economist Jeffery Sachs who talks about the strategy of development finance which emphasizes the important role of entrepreneurship and markets over a staid aid-system of development that preaches hand-outs.
     
     
    Noble Peace Prize Winner Muhammad Yunus who created the microcredit said in the Global Social Submit which was conducted a month ago...
     

    I’m encouraging young people to become social business entrepreneurs and contribute to the world, rather than just making money. Making money is no fun. Contributing to and changing the world is a lot more fun.
     
    Poor people are a like bonsai tree, a little tree. You pick the seed of the tallest tree in the forest and take the best seed out of it, and plant it in a flower pot. You get a tiny little tree, we call it a bonsai. Nothing wrong with the seed, you’ve got the best seed possible. Nothing wrong with the tree, because you actually picked the tallest tree in the forest. But actually it grows this far… why? Because we put them in the flower pot. The base. Society is the base. And society is so stingy it doesn’t give the poor ppl the space to grow.

    So i say, change the base! If you change the base, anybody will be as tall as anybody else! My belief is poverty is not caused by poor people. Poverty is caused by the system. Poverty is caused by the policies that we pursue.
     
    People can change their own lives, provided they have the right kind of institutional support. They’re not asking for charity, charity is no solution to poverty.
     
    We have created a society that does not allow opportunities for people to take care of themselves because we have denied them those opportunities.
     
    I was teaching in one of the universities while the country was suffering from a severe famine. People were dying of hunger, and I felt very helpless. As an economist, I had no tool in my tool box to fix that kind of situation.I went to the bank and proposed that they lend money to the poor people. The bankers almost fell over.

    They explained to me that the bank cannot lend money to poor people because these people are not creditworthy.
     
    Poverty is unnecessary.
     
    Muhammad Yunus in Conversation with Jeffrey Sachs
     
    How can the power of the free market be used to solve the problems of poverty, hunger and inequality? Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus pioneered Microcredit, the innovative banking program that provides poor people—mainly women—with small loans to launch businesses and lift their families out of poverty. In his new book, Creating a World Without Poverty, he describes a new way to use business to tackle social problems from poverty and pollution to inadequate health care and lack of education. Yunus served as chairman of the economics department at Chittagong University before devoting his life to providing financial and social services to the poorest of the poor. He is the founder and managing director of Grameen Bank and the author of the bestselling Banker to the Poor.
     
    (About 9 mins)
    La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah
    No Guest-Voting   IP IP Logged
    Damo808  
    Mureed
    Mureed

    Religion: Christian(Catholic)
    Posts: 4265
    Forum Rating: 0
    Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Damo808 Replybullet Posted: 14 December 2010 at 5:01am

    Some regions in Africa regardless of how much aid is thrown at eleviating the suffering of the people will always be basket cases because of the level of corruption in leadership. Corruption in government is arguably as big a problem or worse than issues of drought, weeds, and distribution and ofcourse disease.

    out of thee shall he come forth unto me that is to be the ruler in Israel: and his going forth is from the beginning, from the days of eternity. Micah 5:5
    No Guest-Voting   IP IP Logged
    a well wisher  
    Admin Group
    Admin Group
    Avatar
    Religion: Islam(Muslim)
    Posts: 8391
    Forum Rating: 0
    Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 14 December 2010 at 3:33pm

    Hello Brother Damo

    I do agree that corruption contributes to the whole scenario but sometimes it is also used as a scapegoat excuse to shift the discourse...Most regions of Africa are suffering ...For a continent so rich in natural resources and the population to work them,  it is  mired in the most debilitating levels of poverty in the world but it is a region rife with armed conflict..There are African nations with military budget worth ten times their education and healthcare budgets combined..With some conflicts continuing for 20 or 30 years it makes it very difficult for those surviving such conditions to make long-term plans which could help them find their way out of poverty...Then there are land rights and ownership problems and due to the history of one-crop production and the legacies it has left on the continent, many of the crops grown are not those which are able to feed a nation... They are instead crops which are intended for a “dessert economy” meaning that they are non-essential crops which are destined for consumption in the West, (tobacco, sugar, coffee, tea, etc)....Large industrial farming takes the most fertile land from those who could otherwise be using the land for subsistence farming. In the trade cycle African nations have little or no power.... Since there are many countries selling, but only a few buying, the buyers control the price....The poor countries have to sell to repay loans and thus are trapped into going along even when they are convinced that the prices are not fair....So there are multi faceted issues at play and granted that empowering those people may not prevent wars or drought but it will definitely assist Africans in being more independent and prepared when such events occur.
     
    This is an interesting article with Phillipines  and China as examples but it does raise some very valid points
     
     
    Is Corruption the Cause?

    The Poverty Trap

    The issue of corruption resonates in developing countries. In the Philippines, for instance, the slogan of the coalition that is likely to win the 2010 presidential elections is "Without corrupt officials, there are no poor people."

    Not surprisingly, the international financial institutions have weighed in. The World Bank has made "good governance" a major thrust of its work, asserting that the "World Bank Group focus on governance and anticorruption (GAC) follows from its mandate to reduce poverty — a capable and accountable state creates opportunities for poor people, provides better services, and improves development outcomes."

    Because it erodes trust in government, corruption must certainly be condemned and corrupt officials resolutely prosecuted. Corruption also weakens the moral bonds of civil society on which democratic practices and processes rest. But although research suggests it has some bearing on the spread of poverty, corruption is not the principal cause of poverty and economic stagnation, popular opinion notwithstanding.

    World Bank and Transparency International data show that the Philippines and China exhibit the same level of corruption, yet China grew by 10.3 percent per year between 1990 and 2000, while the Philippines grew by only 3.3 percent. Moreover, as a recent study by Shaomin Lee and Judy Wu shows, "China is not alone; there are other countries that have relatively high corruption and high growth rates."

    The "corruption-causes-poverty narrative" has become so hegemonic that it has often marginalized policy issues from political discourse. This narrative appeals to the elite and middle class, which dominate the shaping of public opinion....
     
     
    Policy and Poverty in the Third World

    The Philippine story is paradigmatic. Many countries in Latin America, Africa, and Asia saw the same story unfold. Taking advantage of the Third World debt crisis, the IMF and the World Bank imposed structural adjustment in over 70 developing countries in the course of the 1980s. Trade liberalization followed adjustment in the 1990s as the WTO, and later rich countries, dragooned developing countries into free-trade agreements.

    Because of this trade liberalization, gains in economic growth and poverty reduction posted by developing countries in the 1960s and 1970s had disappeared by the 1980s and 1990s. In practically all structurally adjusted countries, trade liberalization wiped out huge swathes of industry, and countries enjoying a surplus in agricultural trade became deficit countries. By the beginning of the millennium, the number of people living in extreme poverty had increased globally by 28 million from the decade before. The number of poor increased in Latin America and the Caribbean, Central and Eastern Europe, the Arab states, and sub-Saharan Africa. The reduction in the number of the world's poor mainly occurred in China and countries in East Asia, which spurned structural readjustment policies and trade liberalization multilateral institutions and local neoliberal technocrats imposed other developing economies.

    China and the rapidly growing newly industrializing countries of East and Southeast Asia, where most of the global reduction in poverty took place, were marked by high degrees of corruption. The decisive difference between their performance and that of countries subjected to structural adjustment was not corruption but economic policy.

    Despite its malign effect on democracy and civil society, corruption is not the main cause of poverty. The "anti poverty, anti-corruption" crusades that so enamor the middle classes and the World Bank will not meet the challenge of poverty. Bad economic policies create and entrench poverty. Unless and until we reverse the policies of structural adjustment, trade liberalization, and conservative macroeconomic management, we will not escape the poverty trap.



    Edited by a well wisher - 14 December 2010 at 3:34pm
    La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah
    No Guest-Voting   IP IP Logged
    Page  of 4 Next >>
    Post Reply Post New Topic
    Printable version Printable version

    Forum Jump
    You cannot post new topics in this forum
    You cannot reply to topics in this forum
    You cannot delete your posts in this forum
    You cannot edit your posts in this forum
    You cannot create polls in this forum
    You cannot vote in polls in this forum

    Bulletin Board Software by Web Wiz Forums version 8.03
    Copyright ©2001-2006 Web Wiz Guide
    Disclaimer
    The opinions expressed by members of the Whyislam Forum do not necessarily reflect the beliefs of the Whyislam Team, or any of its subsidiaries, or parent organizations.