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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 22 October 2014 at 7:20am
Food Wastage Footprint

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Md3ddmtja6s


(About 4 mins)


La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 28 October 2014 at 5:17pm

BRIAN GROW:Matt Fellowes, at Brookings Institution, published a report called "From Poverty, Opportunity" how more companies were looking at low income Americans as a very attractive business opportunity.

Sort of defies conventional wisdom that the low income consumer is a segment of the market, where most companies wouldn't want to play. And it was pretty powerful and fascinating.

MATT FELLOWES:I've estimated in my research that among the bottom 25 percent of households, they're collectively bringing in about 650 billion dollars every year.

So you can imagine why an amount of money that large is attractive to a great variety of businesses, from large financial services companies to new, uh, to entrepreneurs looking for innovations to serve this market.

SILVIA CHASE:That the poor can be lucrative to big business was intriguing enough to the reporter. But Matt Fellowes' evidence for that case was even more so. The Fellowes report noted that wages have been stagnant for years; to compensate the working poor are buying items small and large by taking out loans from companies all too happy to lend them the money at a very high rate.

MATT FELLOWES:Lower income families tend to pay higher prices for nearly every basic necessity from groceries to the price of a car to the price of a mortgage.


BOB HERBERT:What is the point of having government on the side of the rich and powerful in this society? I mean, just off the top of my head. I mean, that seems insane. So, you have, for example, credit cards. People are, I mean, people are milking the equity out of their homes to pay off credit card debt, which is really insane.

But how can it possibly be okay to have credit rates of credit card interest that were usurious, and, you know, a few decades ago, if a loan shark was charging that kind of interest, the guy would have been — the guy would have been locked up. But that's okay. The government comes down on the side of the corporations, making it more difficult for ordinary workers to organize. So you can't become part of a union which could represent your interests. And you can just follow this all along the line.

BILL MOYERS:Listen to this. Quote: "Between 2000 and 2006, the last time since figures were available, those among the very top ten percent of all households, on average, increased their income by about two percent, while those in the bottom 90 percent lost more than four percent." I mean, how is it we're allowing this to happen, the stagnation of wages for the majority of people?

DEAN BAKER:Well, again, we just have policies in place that just keep skewing income more and more upwards.





Edited by a well wisher - 10 November 2014 at 6:42am
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 09 November 2014 at 11:42am
Ending hunger now

Josette Sheeran, the head of the UN's World Food Program, talks about why, in a world with enough food for everyone, people still go hungry, still die of starvation, still use food as a weapon of war. Her vision: "Food is one issue that cannot be solved person by person. We have to stand together."




(About 20 mins)


Edited by a well wisher - 10 November 2014 at 6:43am
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 10 November 2014 at 4:43am
Fewer hungry humans — but still too many

Lack of food, as we’ve said, is not the problem. The world produces enough food for everyone to be properly nourished and lead a healthy and productive life. Hunger exists because of poverty, natural disasters, earthquakes, floods and droughts. Women are particularly affected. In many countries they do most of the farming, but do not have the same access as men to training, credit or land.

Hunger exists because of conflict and war, which destroy the chance to earn a decent living. It exists because poor people don’t have access to land to grow viable crops or keep livestock, or to steady work that would give them an income to buy food. It exists because people sometimes use natural resources in ways that are not sustainable. It exists because there is not enough investment in the rural sector in many countries to support agricultural development. Hunger exists because financial and economic crises affect the poor most of all by reducing or eliminating the sources of income they depend on to survive.

And finally it exists because there is not yet the political will and commitment to make the changes needed to end hunger, once and for all.

But how do you go about fixing those problems and mustering the political will? The new report suggests:

Hunger reduction requires an integrated approach, which would include: public and private investments to raise agricultural productivity; better access to inputs, land, services, technologies and markets; measures to promote rural development; social protection for the most vulnerable, including strengthening their resilience to conflicts and natural disasters; and specific nutrition programmes, especially to address micronutrient deficiencies in mothers and children under five.

In other words, the technical solutions can help with the political solutions and vice versa. This is a bit of a chicken and egg problem: Which do you do first: stop the war, or help farmers grow more food? If people are hungry, perhaps it’s better to send grain rather than soldiers. But if militants grab and sell the grain, we’re back to square one. The answer to the chicken and egg question seems to be: both.

As for the answer to the question I began with: Haiti is the nation with the highest percentage of hungry citizens. An astonishing 52 percent of people there are undernourished.




http://grist.org/food/fewer-hungry-humans-but-still-too-many/


Edited by a well wisher - 10 November 2014 at 6:44am
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 12 November 2014 at 3:37am
The science (and art) of feeding ourselves

The issue keeps coming up when I write about genetic engineering, or local food systems, or decreased farm yield due to climate change: How do we avoid starvation as populations grow, and how can we allow people to feed themselves equitably and sustainably? The question seems to lurk in the background of every story I do, and this makes me uncomfortable, because I don’t know enough to answer. So I’m diving into the debate, blogging as I go.

I recently attended a debate on this topic put on by the Beahrs Environmental Leadership Program at UC Berkeley, and it quickly became clear that there are several contentious issues flying crosswise here. We really have a lot of work ahead of us. This was supposed to be a debate over solutions, but there was no agreement over what the problem is.

Economist David Zilberman argued that we should use agroecology — in this context, agroecology meant small, diverse, low-input, labor-intensive farms — but we shouldn’t give up biotechnology as a tool. Conservation biologist Claire Kremen argued we should focus strictly on agroecology as the best way to get food to the poorest and hungriest people. And Eric Holt-Gimenez, executive director of Food First, argued that the real problem was capitalism, and to keep people from going hungry you need to regulate markets.

It was a mixed-up discussion. Two of the panelists said, “I don’t know where to start,” as the event sprawled into incoherence. In their defense, the terms of the debate were posed in a ridiculous way: How do we feed the world — with biotechnology or agroecology? That’s like asking: How do we drive cars — with catalytic converters or spark plugs?

Often, figuring out the right question to ask is more important than picking an answer. And, at the very least, this debate left me with some clear questions. For instance:

What is the relationship between agricultural productivity and hunger? Holt-Gimenez and Kremen both presented evidence that hunger is disconnected from the global food supply. Zilberman, the economist, didn’t offer any counterarguments — though this may have had something to do with the fact that the agroecology side (absurdly) had twice the time to make their arguments.

Do we really need to worry about producing more on each farm? Holt-Gimenez and Kremen suggested that we shouldn’t even begin to struggle with the problem of increasing yields until we deal with the political problems that prevent our — currently sufficient — food supply from reaching the poor.

When it comes to food, should we be limiting markets, or freeing markets?

Realistically, what does modernization of farming in Africa and Asia look like? Will it resemble the American system, with fewer, bigger farms? Or is there a way for small, peasant farmers to become more prosperous while remaining relatively small?

As I start I’m especially open to feedback: Are these the right questions? And who has done the best work in answering them? I’m specifically interested in connecting with sources and experts beyond the usual suspects. As I learned when writing about GMOs, there are plenty of people studying these issues in a careful, open-minded way. Usually, those are not the same as those shouting in the town square (i.e. the internet) who usually get the attention of journalists. I’d welcome recommendations.



http://grist.org/food/hungry-hungry-humans-the-science-and-art-of-feeding-ourselves/
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 29 November 2014 at 4:45pm
Police Arrest 90-Year-Old and Two Pastors for Feeding Homeless People


“One of the police officers said, ‘Drop that plate right now,’ as if I were carrying a weapon,” recalled Abbott. “It’s man’s inhumanity to man is all it is.”

On Wednesday evening, Abbott and Pastor Black remained undeterred as they served a four-course meal to nearly 100 homeless people at Fort Lauderdale Beach. After police officers recorded the simple act of kindness on their video cameras, they escorted Abbott away from the crowd to fingerprint him and issue another citation. Wary of public backlash, law enforcement officials chose not to place Abbott in handcuffs and haul him off to jail again.



A World War II veteran and civil rights activist, Abbot has been serving the homeless for over 20 years in honor of his late wife. Since feeding homeless people has become his life’s work, Abbott operates several programs including a culinary school that trains homeless people how to cook while helping them find jobs in local kitchens. Through his nonprofit organization, Love Thy Neighbor, Abbott has helped put hundreds of homeless people through culinary school.

Abbott boldly stated Mayor Seiler and the city commission are just puppets of business owners who want to either run the homeless out of town or keep them out of sight. Fearing a drop in tourism and a recent rise in the local homeless population, city officials have decided to design laws targeted at punishing impoverished people instead of addressing the larger issues of assisting those often plagued by mental health disorders and substance abuse addictions.

Over 30 cities across the nation have outlawed or are considering criminalizing the provision of food to homeless people. According to the National Coalition for the Homeless, over 20 cities have devised laws against giving food to homeless people since January 2013.





http://www.nationofchange.org/2014/11/09/police-arrest-90-year-old-two-pastors-feeding-homeless-people/
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 01 December 2014 at 2:20am
Welfare bureaucracies claim a professional, political, and financial monopoly over the social imagination, setting standards of what is valuable and what is feasible. This monopoly is at the root of the modernization of poverty. Every simple need to which an institutional answer is found permits the invention of a new class of poor and a new definition of poverty. Once basic needs have been translated by a society into demands for scientifically produced commodities, poverty is defined by standards which the technocrats can change at will. Poverty then refers to those who have fallen behind an advertised ideal of consumption in some important respect.


Modernized poverty appears when the intensity of market dependence reaches a certain threshold. Subjectively, it is the experience of frustrating affluence which occurs in persons mutilated by their overwhelming reliance on the riches of industrial productivity. Simply, it deprives those affected by it of their freedom and power to act autonomously, to live creatively; it confines them to survival through being plugged into market relations. And precisely because this new impotence is so deeply experienced, it is with difficulty expressed. We are the witnesses of a barely perceptible transformation in ordinary language by which verbs that formerly designated satisfying actions are replaced by nouns that denote packages designed for passive consumption only: for example, "to learn" becomes "acquisition of credits." A profound change in individual and social self-images is here reflected. And the layman is not the only one who has difficulty in accurately describing what he experiences. The professional economist is unable to recognize the poverty his conventional instruments fail to uncover. Nevertheless, the new mutant of impoverishment continues to spread. The peculiarly modern inability to use personal endowments, communal life, and environmental resources in an autonomous way infects every aspect of life where a professionally engineered commodity has succeeded in replacing a culturally shaped use-value. The opportunity to experience personal and social satisfaction outside the market is thus destroyed. I am poor, for instance, when the use-value of my feet is lost because I live in Los Angeles on the thirty-fifth floor.

This new impotence-producing poverty must not be confused with the widening gap between the consumption of rich and poor in a world where basic needs are increasingly shaped by industrial commodities. That gap is the form traditional poverty assumes in an industrial society, and the conventional terms of class struggle appropriately reveal and reduce it. I further distinguish modernized poverty from the burdensome price exacted by the externalities which increased levels of production spew into the environment. It is clear that these kinds of pollution, stress, and taxation are unequally imposed. Correspondingly, defenses against such depredations are unequally distributed. But like the new gaps in access, such inequities in social costs are aspects of industrialized poverty for which economic indicators and objective verification can be found. Such is not true for the industrialized impotence which affects both rich and poor. Where this kind of poverty reigns, life without addictive access to commodities is rendered either impossible or criminal. Making do without consumption becomes impossible, not just for the average consumer but even for the poor. All forms of welfare, from affirmative action to environmental action, are of no help. The liberty to design and craft one's own distinctive dwelling is abolished in favor of the bureaucratic provision of standardized housing, as in the United States, Cuba or Sweden. The organization of employment, skills, building resources, rules, and credit favor shelter as a commodity rather than as an activity. Whether the product is provided by an entrepreneur or an apparatchik, the effective result is the same: citizen impotence, our specifically modern experience of poverty.

Wherever the shadow of economic growth touches us, we are left useless unless employed on a job or engaged in consumption; the attempt to build a house or set a bone outside the control of certified specialists appears as anarchic conceit. We lose sight of our resources, lose control over the environmental conditions which make these resources applicable, lose taste for self-reliant coping with challenges from without and anxiety from within. Take childbirth in Mexico today: delivery without professional care has become unthinkable for those women whose husbands are regularly employed and therefore have access to social services, no matter how marginal or tenuous. They move in circles where the production of babies faithfully reflects the patterns of industrial outputs. Yet their sisters in the slums of the poor or the villages of the isolated still feel quite competent to give birth on their own mats, unaware that they face a modern indictment of criminal neglect toward their infants. But as professionally engineered delivery models reach these independent women, the desire, competence, and conditions for autonomous behavior are being destroyed.

For advanced industrial society, the modernization of poverty means that people are helpless to recognize evidence unless it has been certified by a professional, be he a television weather commentator or an educator; that organic discomfort becomes intolerably threatening unless it has been medicalized into dependence on a therapist; that neighbors and friends are lost unless vehicles bridge the separating distance (created by the vehicles in the first place).

In short, most of the time we find ourselves out of touch with our world, out of sight of those for whom we work, out of tune with what we feel.

-Ivan Illich
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 14 January 2015 at 7:59pm
Paulo Freire: “Pedagogy of the oppressed” and working class

In 1968, protest movements such as May in Paris, the Prague Spring, the Mexican student movement and demonstrations against the Vietnam War illustrated rebellion against the current status quo: a colonialist economic and social model. In Brazil, 1969, a university professor, Paulo Freire (1921-1997), proposed a revolutionary educational theory: Pedagogy of the Oppressed.

Freire suffered eight years of extreme poverty, a consequence of the 1929 crisis that struck North-East Brazil. Suffering extreme poverty as a child had a noticeable effect on Freire’s intellectual work. His aim of providing constructive, critical awareness to the working classes helped to strengthen worldwide movements fighting for social justice, particularly in Latin America.

The influence of this movement thrived globally, both in poor and rich countries with social inequalities. In Latin America, the Landless Workers’ Movement (MST) and the Sandinista National Liberation Front (FSLN) developed Freirean principles in their educational systems. This resulted in the country’s poorest citizens gaining both individual and collective responsibility for their own education.

Freire stated that the apathy and resignation of the oppressed classes were tremendous assets to neoliberalism. In order to combat alienation of the oppressed classes, the Brazilian professor’s weapon of choice was to promote curiosity for learning, particularly the feeling of learning. As Freire ponders, “Neoliberalism teaches workers to be good mechanics, but not to discuss the aesthetics, politics and ideology behind learning. The student will not, for example, ask: who benefits from this piece you’re building?”


http://www.theprisma.co.uk/2014/04/06/paulo-freire-55-years-later-pedagogy-of-the-oppressed-and-working-class-education-in-scotland/
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 15 January 2015 at 3:02pm
Playing with hunger

90% of food produced annually belongs to only 10 major multinationals. Companies which put their own profits before human lives. 1,000 million people suffer from starvation on a planet where food is abundant.

Whilst Nestlé bottles and sells Pakistan’s underground water for high prices, many of the citizens of this Asian country don’t have access to drinking water.

Other inhabitants who are seeing how their resources disappear are the indigenous people of the Amazonian jungle. Their forests have been transformed into green meadows where the cattle of Kraft’s suppliers graze.

These are only two examples of the social and environmental impact caused by two major food multinationals, which have put their commercial interests before anything else.
Intermon Oxfam has published a report aiming to show the main irregularities of the 10 principal food companies, and how their businesses have a negative impact on The Developing World.

Companies such as Coca-Cola, Pepsico, Unilever, Associated British Foods and Danone are part of this study.

This investigation points out that the businesses of these multinationals are responsible for the degradation of the ecosystem, high rates of starvation and even cases of child exploitation

Today these powerful groups control the majority of world food production – up to 90% of the total volume. Also, the study warns that their commercial practices are ‘considerably weakening food safety, and are reducing the economic opportunities of the poorest people around the world’

The document adds that commercial politics do not help to create ‘a fairer food system’

Carlo Petrini, president and founder of Slow Food, in a conference in Bogota, blamed food companies for causing the hunger problems.

‘The food industry is a criminal mafia’, Petrini declared, where ‘80% of seeds in the world belongs to only five multinationals’, controlling by their decisions the future of many countries.

These statements were supported by Janaina Stronzake, from The Landless Worker´s Movement of Brazil, who states that ‘multinationals speculate in people’s hunger and receive benefits from it’.


http://www.theprisma.co.uk/2013/04/28/playing-with-hunger/
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 16 January 2015 at 5:50pm
The burning of popular fear

The way we define the poor is a reflection of the kind of society we live in, argues Zygmunt Bauman.




The decisive argument in favour of the unconditional social guarantee of basic livelihood can be found not in the moral duty towards the destitute, however redeeming for the ethical health of society the fulfilment of that duty undoubtedly is. Neither is it there in philosophical renditions of justice, however important these are to arouse and keep awake human consciences. Nor in benefits for the quality of life in common, however crucial these are for the general well-being and for the survival of human bonds. No, it lies in its importance for a truly autonomous, self-governing society; for restoring to all men and women their courage to exercise the role of citizen and for the daring and imagination needed to exercise it properly. Fully fledged citizenship and a society capable of choosing its way are conceivable solely in the company of self-confident people; secure people; people free from the existential fear of poverty.


http://newint.org/features/1999/03/01/consumerism/
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 17 January 2015 at 2:45pm
Small-Scale Traditional Farming Is the Only Way to Avoid Food Crisis

New scientific research increasingly shows how “agroecology” offers environmentally sustainable methods that can meet the rapidly growing demand for food.


Agriculture needs a new direction

“The 2009 global food crisis signaled the need for a turning point in the global food system,” she said at the event hosted by the Transnational Institute, a leading international think tank. She continued:

Modern agriculture, which began in the 1950s, is more resource intensive, very fossil fuel dependent, using fertilizers, and based on massive production. This policy has to change.

We are already facing a range of challenges. Resource scarcity, increased population, decreasing land availability and accessibility, emerging water scarcity, and soil degradation require us to re-think how best to use our resources for future generations.

The U.N. official said that new scientific research increasingly shows how “agroecology” offers far more environmentally sustainable methods that can still meet the rapidly growing demand for food:

Agroecology is a traditional way of using farming methods that are less resource oriented, and which work in harmony with society. New research in agroecology allows us to explore more effectively how we can use traditional knowledge to protect people and their environment at the same time.

Small farmers are the key to a healthy future

“There is a geographical and distributional imbalance in who is consuming and producing,” Hilal Elver continued.

Global agricultural policy needs to adjust. In the crowded and hot world of tomorrow, the challenge of how to protect the vulnerable is heightened.

That entails recognizing women’s role in food production—from farmer, to housewife, to working mother, women are the world’s major food providers. It also means recognizing small farmers, who are also the most vulnerable and the most hungry.

“Food policies which do not address the root causes of world hunger would be bound to fail.”

Across Europe, the U.S., and the developing world, small farms face shrinking numbers. So if we deal with small farmers we solve hunger and we also deal with food production.

Several other food experts at the Transnational Institute offered criticisms of prevailing industrial practices. David Fig, who serves on the board of Biowatch South Africa, an NGO concerned with food sovereignty and sustainable agriculture, said:

We are being far too kind to industrialized agriculture. The private sector has endorsed it, but it has failed to feed the world, it has contributed to major environmental contamination and misuse of natural resources. It’s time we switched more attention, public funds and policy measures to agroecology, to replace the old model as soon as possible.

Sergio Sauer, formerly Brazil’s national rapporteur for human rights in land, territory and food, added:

Agroecology is related to the way you relate to land, to nature to each other—it is more than just organic production, it is a sustainable livelihood.

In Brazil we have the National Association of Agroecology which brings together 7,000 people from all over the country pooling together their concrete empirical experiences of agroecological practices. They try to base all their knowledge on practice, not just on concepts.

Generally, nobody talks about agroecology, because it’s too political. The simple fact that the FAO is calling a major international gathering to discuss agroecology is therefore a very significant milestone.



http://www.yesmagazine.org/planet/un-only-small-farmers-and-agroecology-can-feed-the-world
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 28 January 2015 at 4:24pm
Modelling and Measuring Subjective Well-Being


Background to the research

While economists have traditionally eschewed the use of subjective data, there is a recent explosion of interest in the use of subjective well-being or ‘happiness’ data by economists and other social scientists. An increasing number of analysts have come to believe that since happiness is generally considered the ultimate goal of life, economics is or should be about individual happiness. In his Lionel Robbins lectures at the LSE in March 2003, the labour economist Richard Layard stated: “The scientific study of happiness is only just beginning. It should become a central topic in social science”.

Insights from happiness research have far-reaching implications for government policy. Much economic research on such issues as income determination, provision of public goods and services, environmental quality, economic inequality and economic growth is motivated by a concern to raise people’s welfare. The availability of measures of subjective well-being now means that their effect on welfare can be directly assessed. For instance, it is possible to measure whether an increase in unemployment can be compensated, in terms of welfare, by the resultant decline in inflation. Subjective well-being data can also be used to improve our understanding of how best to alleviate poverty.

Research questions being posed

The conventional approach of economists to the measurement of poverty in poor countries is to use measures of income or consumption. This has been challenged by those who favour broader criteria for poverty. These include the fulfilment of ‘basic needs’, the ‘capabilities’ to be and to do things of intrinsic worth, and safety from insecurity and vulnerability. To what extent are these different concepts measurable, to what extent are they competing and to what extent complementary, and is it possible for them to be accommodated within an encompassing framework?

Economic research on ‘subjective well-being’ (or ‘happiness’, or ‘satisfaction with life’) is sparse and recent but growing rapidly. It is apparent from the literature that there are two important gaps. First, reflecting the availability of data, there is little research on poor countries. Second, within any country, there is little research on the relationship between well-being and the notion of poverty. This research is intended to help fill these gaps.

Any attempt to define poverty involves a value judgement as to what constitutes a good or bad quality of life. We argue that an approach which examines the individual’s own perception of well-being is less imperfect, or more quantifiable, or both, as a guide to forming that value judgement than are the other potential approaches. We develop a methodology for using subjective well-being as the criterion for poverty, and illustrate its use by reference to a South African data set which contains information on reported well-being as well as much socio-economic information on the individual, the household and the community.

We argue that it is possible to view subjective well-being as an encompassing concept, which permits us to quantify the relevance and importance of the other approaches and of their component variables. The estimated well-being functions for South Africa contain some variables corresponding to the income approach, some to the basic needs (or physical functioning) approach, some to the relative (or social functioning) approach, and some to the security approach. Thus, our methodology effectively provides weights of the relative importance of these various components of well-being poverty.

Some preliminary findings

The importance of our variables representing relative position in society (the ‘relevant others’ being others in one’s locality or of one’s race) provides grounds for viewing poverty partly as a relative concept.

We find that average income of the cluster (a small local grouping of households) enters the happiness function positively and significantly. We argue that this can be interpreted as suggesting a small, tight community containing elements of altruism, mutual insurance, or the existence of a ‘social wage’ (or some combination of these positive aspects of a locality). In contrast we find a negative impact of average income of the (larger) district. This finding suggests a role for envy, rivalry or feelings of relative deprivation.

We find that different factors affect the subjective well-being of the poor and the non-poor. We find absolute income to be an important determinant of the well-being of the poor but relative income (defined in terms of race) to be important for the non-poor.



http://www.gprg.org/themes/t1-pov-house-well/qual-quant-meas-welf/model-meas-well.htm
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 30 January 2015 at 6:00pm
Let’s End Poverty: We Have the Money, Do We Have the Will?

You don’t have to crunch many numbers to see that having a permanent underclass is neither natural nor inevitable but is, in fact, a choice our society has made. Consciously.

“There’s class warfare, all right, but it’s my class, the rich class, that’s making war, and we’re winning,” explained Warren Buffet, the billionaire who became a traitor to his class by calling for higher taxes on the wealthy.

If we want to do something about poverty, our first step is crucial: Change the story. Stop believing the myths: that “we’ll always have poor people” or that “the poor deserve their lot.” Accepting these fictions will assure more poverty and send more money upward to transnational corporations and the superrich—who will spend it to further manipulate a political process that already has made inequality more extreme in America than in any other developed country.


http://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/the-end-of-poverty/choose-to-end-poverty
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 09 February 2015 at 5:23am
The 'Dangerous Delusions' About How to Help the World's Poor

Today, in Davos, Switzerland, world leaders gather for the annual World Economic Forum (WEF) will pat each other on the back about the world being better than ever. While the WEF's recent Global Risks report talked darkly of interstate conflict, high structural unemployment, and a worsening climate situation, the mood at this event is usually marked by triumphalism, as politicians and philanthropists award themselves accolades for solving the world's problems.

The idea is that we're living in a golden age. Leaders point to mankind's past and say, "But you're not dying of diphtheria like your Victorian ancestors" as if century-old historical gratitude was some kind of answer to questions about injustice and darkness in the here and now. Of course, the world doesn't really work like that. Poor people don't have to be grateful that they're not in imminent danger of being eaten by a saber-tooth tiger.

The social justice campaign group Global Justice Now has released a report entitled, "The Poor Are Getting Richer and Other Dangerous Delusions" which undermines a number of assumptions about economics and development being promoted by political and business leaders at Davos. These assumptions include the idea that the poor are getting richer, that big business and free markets are the answer, that aid necessarily makes the world a fairer place and that Africa needs some kind of white savior.

To find out more about it, I spoke to the report's author, Alex Scrivener.

Continued below.


www.vice.com/read/development-world-poverty-wealth-davos-myths-oscar-rickett-200
La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah
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