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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 08 February 2010 at 1:57pm

Al-Nisa (Women)
Chapter 4: Verse 128     (Soul's potential to do evil)

"And human selves are swayed by greed. But if you do good and stay away from evil, verily, Allah is ever well-acquainted with what you do."

These words demonstrate that there is a potential for evil within the souls of humans. The guidance of truth has come from Allah in the form of revelation reaffirming what is already found within the natural disposition of humans (the fitrah) but, at the same time, humans must be aware that within the soul there is a potential for evil and straying from the truth. However, this does not mean that the soul is inherently evil. When the scholars discuss the importance of overcoming the soul and its evil, they are, in reality, simply emphasizing the fact that the soul has a potential for evil and that said potential must be stopped or overcome. This does not mean that the soul is in and of itself evil and something that humans must free themselves from to become truly spiritually pure. Although some may seem to espouse such a view, there is no evidence for it in either the Quran and Sunnah.

Hence, the scope is very wide. The soul may accept the guidance from Allah and be among the most noble of creations and ever pleasing to Allah. On the other hand, the individual may stunt the inherently good qualities in his soul - including the recognition of tauheed or the true oneness of Allah - and, thereby, deliberately allow his evil potential to blossom. Every individual should be aware of the possibility of either of these two scenarios. The person should or must work to overcome any evil tendency in his soul while giving full support to all of the good potential in his soul.


"Purification of the Soul: Concept, Process and Means"

- Jamaal al-Din M. Zarabozo


Edited by a well wisher - 08 February 2010 at 1:58pm
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Al-Ahzab (The Confederates)
Chapter 33: Verse 35               (Equal Footing)

 
 

 "For Muslim men and women, for believing men and women, for devout men and women, for true men and women, for men and women who are patient and constant, for men and women who humble themselves, for men and women who give in charity, for men and women who fast, for men and women who guard their chastity, and for men and women who engage much in Allah's praise, for them has Allah prepared forgiveness and great reward."

Initially, Quranic verses used only the masculine plural form to refer to the women and men in the new faith community. For years, "believers" (al-muminun), and "the truthful" (as-sadiqun), either referred specifically to men or to the men and women who constituted the Prophet's first Companions. Once, a woman (or several, according to the different traditions) asked the Prophet why women were not explicitly mentioned in the revealed message. The Book - which, while revealing a universal message, also included responses to the questions asked by the Men around the Prophet - was later to mention women and men distinctively, as in the above verse.

This evolution of the message is part of divine teaching in the process of revelation carried out over twenty-three years: the faithful are thus led to evolve in their understanding of things and critically reconsider some of their cultural or social practices. The status of women, who were sometimes killed at birth because of the shame they might bring, was to be reformed in stages, as verses were revealed.

It thus appeared more and more clearly that the Quran's message and the Prophet's attitude were apt to free women from the cultural shackles of Arab tribes and clans and from the practices of the time. The Creator addresses women as being on an equal footing with men, their status as beings and believers is the same as men's, and the requirements of worship are absolutely identical.


"
Islamic Ethics and Liberation" - Tariq Ramadan



Edited by a well wisher - 09 February 2010 at 1:42pm
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Yusuf (Joseph)
Chapter 12: Verse 86     (Complaining only to Allah)

"I only complain of my distraction and anguish to Allah ... "

Man needs to obtain his provision and other needs, and to protect himself from harm. In both cases, he should call on Allah. He should not ask for provision from anyone other than Allah, and he should not complain to anyone other than Allah.

In the Quran, Allah has mentioned goodly forsaking, goodly forgiveness and goodly patience. It was said that goodly forsaking is to forsake or boycott without doing harm; goodly forgiveness is to forgive without rebuking; and good patience is to be patient without complaining to any other person or created being. When Ahmad ibn Hanbal was sick, he was told that Tawus used to hate the sound of a sick person's groaning, and would say, "this is a complaint," so Ahmad never groaned until the day he died.

Complaining to the creator, on the other hand, does not contradict the idea of goodly patience. For Yaqub said: "Patience is most fitting (for me)" [Yusuf 12:83], but he also said, "I only complain of my distraction and anguish to Allah ..."

Umar ibn al-Khattab used to recite Surahs Yunus, Yusuf and al-Nahl during Fajr prayer. When he reached this ayah. he wept so much that his sobs could be heard in the last rows of the congregation.

Musa used to pray: "O Allah, to You be all praise and to You (alone) do I complain. You are the (only) One Whom I ask for help, in You I seek refuge and upon You I rely. There is no strength or power except you."


Al-Ubudiyyah: Being a true slave of AllahIbn Taymiyah



Edited by a well wisher - 10 February 2010 at 2:00pm
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Towards Understanding Surah Yusuf - Sh. Yasir Qadhi
 
There is instruction in their stories for people of understanding. This is not a narration which has been invented but confirmation of all that came before, a clarification of everything, and a guidance and a mercy for people who believe.
 (Surah Yusuf, 111)

Recording of Yasir Qadhis episodic series entitled Towards Understanding Surah Yusuf, filmed for Huda TV of Egypt.
 
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Affliction


Al-Balad (The City) Sura 90: Verse 4
 

 
 
 
"Indeed, We have created man in affliction."

No sooner does the first living cell settle in the mother's womb than it starts to encounter affliction and has to work hard in order to prepare for itself the right conditions for its survival, with the permission of its Lord. It continues to do so until it is ready for the process of birth, which is a great ordeal for both the mother and the baby. Before the baby finally sees the light it undergoes a great deal of pushing and squeezing to the point of near suffocation in its passage out of the womb.

A stage of harder endurance and greater suffering follows. The newborn baby begins to breathe the air, which is a new experience. It opens its mouth and inflates its lungs for the first time with a cry which tells of the hard start. The digestive system and the blood circulation then start to function in a manner which is totally unfamiliar. Then it starts to empty its bowels, encountering great difficulty in adapting its system to this new function. Indeed, every new step or movement is attended by suffering. If one watches this baby when it begins to crawl and walk, one sees the kind of effort required to execute such minor and elementary movements. Such affliction continues with teething, and learning to stand, walk, learn and think. Indeed, in every new experience much affliction is involved.

Then the roads diverge and the struggle takes different forms. One person struggles with his muscles, another with his mind and a third with his soul. One toils for a mouthful of food or a rag to dress himself with, another to double or treble his wealth. One person strives to achieve a position of power or influence and another for the sake of God. One struggles for the sake of satisfying lusts and desires, and the other for the sake of his faith or ideology. One strives but achieves no more than Hell and another strives for Paradise. Everyone is carrying his own burden and climbing his own hills to arrive finally at the meeting place appointed by God.

Affliction, life's foremost characteristic, takes various forms and shapes but it is always judged by its eventual results. The loser is the one who ends up suffering more afflictions in the hereafter, and the prosperous is the one whose striving qualifies him to be released from his affliction and ensures him the ultimate repose under his Lord's shelter. Yet there is some reward for the different kinds of struggle which people endure. The one who labours for a great cause differs from the one who labours for a trivial one, in the amount and the quality of gratification each of them gains from his labour and sacrifice.


In The Shade of The Quran - Sayyid Qutb

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Guidance in All Fields

[Surely this Qur'an shows the way to that which is most upright.)

(Al-Israa' 17:9)

This is a general statement applicable to all those who are guided by the Qur'an and the goals to which it guides. Thus, guidance that is restricted by neither time nor place is given to people. And the superiority of its guidance applies to all that they may attain when they follow any method or approach. It is also superior to every good thing to which people may be guided at any time or place.

The Qur'an guides to that which is "most upright" in relation to people's inner feelings and thoughts, outlining a clear faith, free of complication and ambiguity. Its guidance frees the human spirit of the burden of myth and superstition, and it releases human energy so that it is constructive, bringing benefit, providing a harmonious link between the laws that govern the universe and those governing human nature.

The Qur'an also ensures harmony between a person's outward and inward existence, feelings and behavior, faith and action. In all this, it shows the way to what is "most upright," linking all these aspects to the true and inseverable bond that exists between people and God. This enables people to look up to a higher horizon while they are still on earth. Thus, what people do in their daily life becomes an act of worship, provided that they do so seeking God's acceptance. This is true even when the action itself provides them with pure enjoyment of what is available in this life.

In the field of worship also, the Qur'an establishes a perfect balance between duties and abilities. This ensures that duties are not seen as too hard so as to constitute a heavy burden or induce despair of ever fulfilling one's obligations. Maintaining this balance ensures that a person neither takes matters too lightly or complacently on the one hand, nor exceeds the limits of what is reasonable and perfectly bearable on the other. Thus we can say without fear of contradiction that in worship, the Qur'an shows the way to that which is most upright.

The same applies to human interaction whether between individuals and couples, governments and peoples, or states and races. Relations between all these groups are established on a firm basis, influenced neither by personal prejudice and interest, nor by feelings of love and hatred. This firm foundation in human relations is chosen by God, the Creator Who knows His creation and what is certain to promote goodness in their lives. The Qur'an shows the way that gives the best course of action in the fields of politics and finance, as well as in those of social and international relations.

The Qur'an also endorses all divine religions, establishing a firm link between them, honoring all that is sacred in them, and protecting all that they hold in reverence. This ensures that humanity, with all its divine faiths, lives in peace. In this, again, the Qur'an provides its perfect guidance. This is all summed up in the verse that reads,  [Surely this Qur'an shows the way to that which is most upright (Al-Israa' 17:9).

                             In The Shade of The Quran - Sayyid Qutb

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Elevating Humanity
Al-Muminun (The Believers) Sura 23: Verses 51-52

"Messengers! Eat of that which is wholesome, and do good deeds: I certainly have full knowledge of all that you do. This community of yours is one single community and I am your only Lord. Therefore, fear me alone."

This address to the Messengers requires them to live as human beings, which is the very thing that those who opposed them questioned. Eating is a human need, but choosing only what is wholesome is the aspect that elevates human beings and makes them grow in purity. It enables them to establish a bond with the Supreme Society.

They are also required to "do good deeds." While taking action is common to all human beings, insisting on doing good is the characteristic of goodly people, providing a measure of control and a clear goal for their deeds. Again such people look up to the Supreme Society when they embark on anything.

No Messenger of God was ever required to abandon his humanity. Rather, what they were asked to do was to elevate this humanity to the highest standard God has made possible for human beings to achieve. Thus, the Prophets provided the role model and the ideal which other people should try to emulate. It is left to God to judge their actions according to His own fine measure.

Emphasis is placed on the fact that neither time nor place is of any significance when compared with the single truth that all messengers preached. They all shared a very distinctive nature, were given their messages by the One Creator of all, and worked towards the same goal.

In The Shade of The Quran - Sayyid Qutb



Edited by a well wisher - 14 February 2010 at 12:08pm
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Reflections on Surah al-Hujuraat(Part1-4)
 
Imam Suhaib Webb
 
To listen to the talk, please right click on the speaker icon and click Save Link As or Download As. If you simply click on the icon, it will not download the whole thing.
 
 
 
 
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Saba (Sheba)
Chapter 34: Verse 8 (partial)

Window of Hope


"It is those who do not believe in the life to come who are suffering torment as they have gone far in error."


The suffering may refer to their punishment in the life to come. Since it will inevitably overtake them, then it is as if they are already in it, just like they have gone irremediably into error.

But the statement may be understood in a different way, which suggests that those who do not believe in the life to come live in torment just as they live in error. This is a profound statement. A person who spends his life without belief in a second life suffers mental torment, as he lives without hope of justice, fair reward or compensation for what happens in his life.

Indeed human life is full of situations and trials which man cannot face properly unless he looks up with hope for justice and reward for good action and punishment for those who do evil. There are things that one cannot do or bear without looking up to God, hoping to earn His pleasure in the life to come, when nothing large or small is overlooked. Whoever is deprived of this window of hope, which brings comfort and satisfaction, undoubtedly lives in torment as well as in error. Such a person suffers all this in the present life, before suffering punishment in the hereafter for his misdeeds which brought about his present life's suffering.


"In The Shade of The Quran" - Sayyid Qutb
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Al-Ahzab (The Confederate Tribes)
Chapter 33: Verse 4 (partial)

Single Heart


"Never has God put two hearts in one man's body"


Man cannot have one source for his manners and morality, another for his laws and legislation, a third for his social and economic values, and a fourth for his art and philosophy. Such a mixture does not produce a man with a sound heart: it only produces a confused medley that lacks solid form or basis. A person with faith cannot truly hold to his faith and abandon its values and requirements in any situation in life, serious or not. He cannot say a word, take an action, formulate a concept, make a decision unless he remains within the limits established by his faith, which must always be a reality in his life. This is because God has not given him more than one heart, one law and one standard of values. A person of faith cannot say of anything he does: 'I am doing this in my personal capacity and I am doing this in my Islamic capacity', as we frequently hear politicians, businessmen, academics and others say. Since he is one person with one heart, he has one faith and one standard that govern all that he does and says in any and every situation. With this one heart he lives as an individual, a family man, a member of the community, a citizen of the state and the world; he lives in public and private, employer or employee, ruler or ruled, in situations of comfort or distress; having the same values and standards at all times.

In short, we have a single system outlined by the same revelations and submitting to the One God. A single heart cannot worship two deities, serve two masters and move in two directions. Otherwise, it will be pulled apart and will have different motives and considerations. It could easily fall into the trap of hypocrisy.


"In The Shade Of The Quran" - Sayyid Qutb
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[Never say about anything, “I shall do this tomorrow,” without adding, “if God so wills.” Should you forget, then call your Lord to mind and say, “I pray that my Lord will guide me even closer than this to what is right.”]
 
(Al-Kahf 18:23–24)

Every action a human being does or omits to do, indeed every breath a human being takes, is subject to God’s will. The curtains hiding the future are stretched in full so as to hide everything beyond the present moment. Our eyes cannot discern what is behind that curtain, and our minds are finite, no matter how advanced our knowledge may be.

Hence a human being must never say that he is definitely doing something tomorrow unless he attaches his intention to God’s will. This is because tomorrow belongs to the realm that lies beyond the reach of human perception. As such, it is known only to God. Hence, we do not make any assertion about it.

This does not mean that man should be fatalistic, giving no thought to the future and making no plans for it. He should not live for the present moment, cutting himself off from his past and future. No, this is not what the directive implies. Rather, what is implied is that every human being must make an allowance for what God may will in his case. He may intend to do whatever he wants, always seeking God’s help, feeling that His will is in full control of everything. It may well be however that God may decide something different to what he intends. Should God help him to put into effect what he intends, then all well and good. But if God’s will moves in a different direction, he should not despair or be sad. All matters belong to God at the beginning and at the end.

What this means in practice is that every person should think and plan as they wish, but they must always remember to rely on God’s help and guidance. They should realize that they only have the faculties of thinking and deliberation God has given them. This should not lead to laziness or disinterestedness. On the contrary, it should give us more strength, confidence, reassurance and resolve. Should events reveal that God’s will has moved in a direction different to what we planned, we should accept this with contentedness and reassurance. We submit to God’s will, because it is beyond our knowledge until God makes it known.

This is the method Islam instills into the minds of its followers. Hence a Muslim does not feel alone when he plans or thinks of the future. Neither does he show any conceit or arrogance when he succeeds, nor is he overtaken by depression and despair when he fails. In all situations, he remembers God, feeling stronger for relying on Him, expressing gratitude to Him for his success, resigned for whatever God’s will may determine.

[Should you forget, then call your Lord to mind] (Al-Kahf 18:24). This is what a Muslim should do when he forgets to relate his intentions to God’s will. He should remember God and renew his reliance on Him. He should also hope to remain always conscious of God, turning to Him in all situations and all future actions, always saying [I pray that my Lord will guide me even closer than this to what is right] (Al-Kahf 18:24).

This short prayer indicates that it is not so easy to always turn to God in all affairs. Hence the prayer to try always to maintain it and improve on one’s situation.

"In The Shade Of The Quran" - Sayyid Qutb


Edited by a well wisher - 20 February 2010 at 4:42pm
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Moses and Al-Khidr: Model of Resolution

One of the stylistic tools used by the Glorious Qur'an to convey its message is narratives (qasas), which can be found in the Qur'an in different forms and for different purposes. The Qur'an relates the stories of the previous nations, stories of the prophets, descriptions of certain events, etc. All in all, the objective is clear: It is a teaching, glad tidings for believers, a reminder, and a warner. So in all the stories of the Qur'an, there is a lesson for people to derive, not just a narration or a mere tale-telling, as Allah says:

 

[There is, in their stories, instruction for men endued with understanding. It is not a tale invented, but a confirmation of what went before it, a detailed exposition of all things, and a guide and a mercy to any such as believe.] (Yusuf 12:111)

 

One of these is the story of Moses and Al-Khidr, which, according to Abu Al-`Ala Al-Mawdudi in his beautiful commentary on the Qur'an, sends a message to man to have "full faith in the wisdom of what is happening in the Divine Factory in accordance with the will of Allah."    

 

In addition to that, the story reflects a true lesson of life for people, as it teaches us to have a true vision and to strive to attain our goals with determination and valor. This is reflected in the following verse:

 

[Behold, Moses said to his attendant, "I will not give up until I reach the junction of the two seas or (until) I spend years and years in travel.]   (Al-Kahf 18:60)

 

In this glorious verse, Prophet Moses (peace be upon him) demonstrates an unflinching resolution in his course of attaining his goal, making it clear that nothing would stop him from reaching his goal, even if that requires him to travel for ages. And for this fateful journey one thing was clear in his mind: As long as he has ikhlas (sincerity) for the sake of Allah, success is his. This shows that having determination is one thing, but coupling it with ikhlas for Allah is something else; both are very important in everyone's endeavor in life.

 

Also we should not forget necessary provision as an important ingredient in any life journey, just as the case is in this story. We have seen many times that a plan may fail due to poor logistics. This is an important point that tells us that no matter what you want to be, you have to prepare for it, and not only that, you also have to imbue yourself with strong determination coupled with ikhlas for Allah. All this will help you sail through, even amidst the turbulent ocean of life. Just remember Moses' word:

 

[I will not give up until I reach the junction of the two seas or (until) I spend years and years in travel.] (Al-Kahf 18:60)

 

Another point also derived from the story is keeping oneself steadfast in the face of difficulties.

 

[But when they reached the junction, they forgot (about) their fish, which took its course through the sea (straight) as in a tunnel. When they had passed on (some distance), Moses said to his attendant: "Bring us our early meal; truly we have suffered much fatigue at this (stage of) our journey." He said: "Did you see when we took refuge on the rock, and I forgot the fish — and none but Satan caused me to forget to mention it — it took its way into the waters by a marvel." He said, "This is that which we have been seeking. So they retraced their steps again."] (Al-Kahf 18:61-64)

 

In the above verses, we could see that the journey of life is full of hardships, and at the same time it is full of surprises. It takes a lot of patience, wisdom, and courage to overcome life's vicissitudes and to withstand its surprises. But as we journey, we have to be alert, for we will be passing through different signs of God; it is through signs that God speaks to us. He never lets us down, unless we do not grasp His message, and unless we fail to notice His signs.

 

[And how many signs in the heavens and the earth do they pass by? Yet they turn (their faces) away from them!] (Yusuf 12:105)

 

Moses grasped the message of God through His sign, so he was guided to the spot of his mission: [He said: This is that which we have been seeking] (Al-Kahf 18:64).

 

How many of us have failed to notice the signs of our Lord, for failing to grasp His message leads us rambling around in the wilderness thinking that He has let us down. No, He never lets down any of His servants, especially those who call unto Him, believe in Him, and follow His instructions.

 

This is also an important lesson, especially for young Muslims. As they set out on their life journey they must be mindful of their Lord, for through His light they will see and will not get lost. They should listen to the following instruction of Prophet Muhammad )peace and blessings be upon him(:

 

"O young man, be mindful of Allah; He will protect you! Be mindful of Allah; you will find Him always there for you." (At-Tirmidhi)

 

Another significant point in the story is when Moses realized that he had missed the track, his destination, he immediately turned back. One could imagine how grueling this would be, especially to someone who had been traveling for a long time and thus been worn down with fatigue. But here Moses (peace be upon him), and of course his attendant, demonstrated exemplary courage and steadfastness, daring fatigue and weariness; he forgot the meal he had just asked for and retraced his steps to attain the precious goal.

 

This indicates that the moment we realize a flaw in our plan, in steps already taken, we should never hesitate to reverse the process to put things back to normal again without despair or boredom. With such courage and perseverance, we can bring everything within our reach and make our dream become a reality.

We just need to remember Moses's words:

 

[I will not give up until I reach the junction of the two seas or (until) I spend years and years in travel.] (Al-Kahf 18:60)

 
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Reflections Upon Surat Al-`Asr

[By (the Token of) Time (through the ages),surely people are in loss, except the ones who have believed and done deeds of righteousness and enjoin one another to the Truth, and enjoin one another to patience.] (Al-`Asr 103:1-3)

This very short surah outlines a complete system for human life based on the Islamic fundamental principles. It defines, in the clearest and most concise form, the basic concept of faith in the context of its comprehensive reality.

Significance of Faith

What does the adoption of faith then mean? And what is nature and importance in human life?

Faith is the characteristic by which a human being, a small creature with a short lifespan in a limited world, attains closeness to the Absolute and Everlasting Originator of the universe and all that exists therein. The human being, thus, establishes a link with the whole universe, which springs from that One Origin, with the laws governing it and the powers and potentialities it provides.

As a result, he breaks away from the narrow boundaries of his trivial self to the broadness of the universe, from his limited power to the great unknown energies existing in the universe, and from the fleetingness of his life to the eternity that Allah alone comprehends.

This bond with Almighty Allah grants people assured power, limitless scope, and freedom. It endows them with real enjoyment of this beautiful life and enriches their life with a mutual friendship with other creatures.

In this way, life becomes a pleasant journey for people everywhere and at all times. From this, an everlasting happiness and intimate understanding of life and creation are derived. This is the invaluable gain, whose lack is an immeasurable loss.

Moreover, the qualities of faith are those of sublime and dignified humanity, such as the worship of one God, which elevates people above servitude to all others and establishes within them the fact that all human beings are equal.

Having absorbed this fact that there is only one true God Who possesses infinite power, a believing person neither yields nor bows down his or her head to anyone other than Almighty Allah. Consequently, such a believer enjoys true liberty that spontaneously radiates from within his or her conscience as a result of faith and awareness.

Godliness is the second quality of dignified humanity. This quality determines for human beings the source from which they derive their concepts, values, criteria, considerations, doctrines, laws, and whatever brings them into relation with their Creator, the world at large and with their fellow human beings.

Thus, equity and justice replace personal desires and self-interest. This strengthens the believers' realization of the value of their chosen way of life and keeps them above all Jahiliyyah–rooted concepts, interests, and mundane values.

This is also true even when believers find themselves alone, with no one else of their kind to relate to, since they are equipped with values derived directly from their Lord. Those values are indeed the most sound and most deserving of devotion and esteem.

Another quality of faith and dignified humanity is the clarity of the relationship between the Creator and His creatures. Thus, human beings, who are creatures restricted by their own world, are connected with the Everlasting Truth and Infinite Power without any mediator.

Such relationship supplies their hearts and souls with light and contentment, and it gives them confidence and purpose. Furthermore, it eliminates from their minds perplexity, fear, and anxiety, as well as any inclination toward arrogance and tyranny over others.

Following the path ordained by Almighty Allah with steadfastness and clarity of vision is the next quality of the community of believers. This must be maintained so that goodness does not come about casually, incidentally or without deliberation, but rather springs from definite motives and heads toward certain aims.

People united for Allah's cause collaborate. Thus, with a single definite purpose and a single distinguished banner, the Muslim community is united and elevated. Indeed, this is true for all generations that are similarly welded together.

Another quality is belief in the dignity of human beings in Allah's sight. This belief heightens their regard for themselves and restrains them from aspiring to a position higher than that which the Creator has defined for them.

For a person to feel that he is dignified in the sight of His Creator is the loftiest concept one may attain of oneself. Any ideology or philosophy that abases this valuation and ascribes a dishonorable origin to humankind, separating it from Almighty Allah is, in effect, nothing but a position of ignominy and degradation, even though it may not declare so openly.

Hence, the effects of Darwinism, Freudianism, and Marxism are among the most horrid disasters human nature has encountered. That is because they teach humanity that all abasement and downright animalism are natural phenomena with which human beings should be familiar and of which they need not be ashamed.

Purity of motivation is yet another quality of the dignified humanity established by faith. This directly follows the realization of people's dignity in the sight of Allah, His supervision over human conscience, and His knowledge of what people harbor in their innermost souls.

A human being untainted by the theories of Freud, Karl Marx, and their type feels ashamed should another person come to know what unhealthy feelings he or she may incidentally experience.

Believers feel the awesome presence of God in their innermost consciousness and their awareness makes them tremble with fear, awe, and respect. They, therefore, resort to self-purification and spiritual cleansing.

A refined moral sense is the natural fruit of faith in Almighty Allah Who is just, kind, compassionate, generous, and forbearing, and Who abhors evil, loves goodness, and knows every furtive look and every secret thought. From this stems the believers' responsibility, which is the direct result of their freewill and the fact that Almighty Allah is ever-aware of all that they do and feel.

It stimulates within them healthy awareness, sensitivity, serenity, and foresight. Theirs is a communal, rather than individual, responsibility. What is more is that it is a responsibility toward all humanity, pure and simple.



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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 22 February 2010 at 2:36pm

Never Forget
Al-Duha (Daylight) Sura 93: Verses 6-11

"Did He not find you an orphan and give you shelter? And He found you wandering, and He gave you guidance. And He found you in need, and made you independent. Therefore, do not treat the orphan with harshness, nor chide him who asks. But the bounty of your Lord, proclaim."

These verses of the Quran carry several teachings: being both an orphan and poor was actually an initiatory state for the future Messenger of God, for at least two reasons.

The first teaching is obviously the vulnerability and humility he must naturally have felt from his earliest childhood. This state was intensified when his mother, Aminah, died when Muhammad, peace be upon him, was six. This left him utterly dependent on God, but also close to the most destitute among people. The Quran reminds him that he must never forget this throughout his life and particularly during his prophetic mission. He was orphaned and poor, and for that reason he is reminded and ordered never to forsake the underprivileged and the needy.

Considering the exemplary nature of the prophetic experience, the second spiritual teaching emanating from these verses is valid for each human being: never to forget one's past, one's trials, one's environment and origin, and to turn one's experience into a positive teaching for oneself and for others. Muhammad's past, the One reminds him, is a school from which he must draw useful, practical, and concrete knowledge to benefit those whose lives and hardships he has shared, since he knows from his own experience, better than anyone else, what they feel and endure.

"In The Footsteps of The Prophet" - Tariq Ramadan



Edited by a well wisher - 22 February 2010 at 2:37pm
La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah
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