Hall of FameHall of Fame  Active TopicsActive Topics  Display List of Forum MembersMemberlist  Search The ForumSearch  HelpHelp  chatChat
  RegisterRegister  LoginLogin
Learn about Islam
 Whyislam.org Forums : Learn About Islam : Learn about Islam
Message Icon Topic: Dr. Tariq Ramadan Talks Post Reply Post New Topic
<< Prev Page  of 18 Next >>
Author Message
Al-Cordoby  
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar
Moderator
Religion: Islam(Muslim)
Posts: 27702
Forum Rating: 159
Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 23 January 2013 at 4:57am
Islamic Ethics and Medical Science

A talk by Dr. Ramadan on Islam and Medical Sciences

http://www.tariqramadan.com/spip.php?article12669&lang=fr

(50 minutes)

Think Win-Win for a better world for all...

My Blog
Muslim Heritage

No Guest-Voting   IP IP Logged
Al-Cordoby  
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar
Moderator
Religion: Islam(Muslim)
Posts: 27702
Forum Rating: 159
Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 06 February 2013 at 2:15pm
Cambridge Union Debate: Religion Has No Place in the 21st. Century!

Dr. Ramadan participated in a debate last month at Cambridge, UK, titled "This house believes religion has no place in the 21st. century"

Dr. Ramadan's talk starts at minute 42:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AHHqrtYJu1c&feature=player_embedded

(96 minutes)

Last week, I participated in a fascinating debate at Cambridge University, featuring professor Richard Dawkins, an evolutionary biologist and fierce defender of atheism, and Dr Rowan Williams, former Archbishop of Canterbury. Our subject: the incompatibility of religion with modern society and the challenges of the 21st century.

Professor Dawkins and his camp asserted that religion is more dangerous than beneficial; that it is inherently ’evil’. For him, the thesis of a Creator of the universe is little more than a (bad) idea, a totally non-demonstrable aberration. His approach was aggressive, cutting-edge, quite dogmatic — religion is dangerous; we should thus be critical of its wild claims and hope that it simply vanishes.

For someone who poses as a rational humanist, it was a curious posture: We should “eliminate” our adversary and seek its destruction in the name of “scientific” facts that alone are true and alone deserve respect. Could dogmatism be the child of rationalism as well as of religion?

http://www.tariqramadan.com/spip.php?article12718

Think Win-Win for a better world for all...

My Blog
Muslim Heritage

No Guest-Voting   IP IP Logged
Al-Cordoby  
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar
Moderator
Religion: Islam(Muslim)
Posts: 27702
Forum Rating: 159
Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 15 February 2013 at 7:13am
Where is The Conversation Going in Interfaith Dialogue?

An interview by Dr. Ramadan on his TV program (Islam and Life)

http://www.tariqramadan.com/spip.php?article12174


(24 minutes)

Think Win-Win for a better world for all...

My Blog
Muslim Heritage

No Guest-Voting   IP IP Logged
Al-Cordoby  
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar
Moderator
Religion: Islam(Muslim)
Posts: 27702
Forum Rating: 159
Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 20 February 2013 at 2:04pm
Dr. Ramadan's Speech at ICNA Convention - December 2012

An inspiring speech by Dr. Ramadan last December on how to live Islam in the US, and how western Muslims can reconcile the West with Muslim majority countries

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=haCjkpp2L3Y#

(40 minutes)

Think Win-Win for a better world for all...

My Blog
Muslim Heritage

No Guest-Voting   IP IP Logged
Al-Cordoby  
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar
Moderator
Religion: Islam(Muslim)
Posts: 27702
Forum Rating: 159
Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 24 February 2013 at 2:17pm

Dr.Tariq Ramadan - Reflections From The Heart

Dr.Tariq Ramadan Guest Speaker at The Islamic Institute of Toronto (IIT) December 25, 2012

Dr. Ramadan's talk starts at minute 10:00

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dvFN2F9a72o

(71 minutes)
Think Win-Win for a better world for all...

My Blog
Muslim Heritage

No Guest-Voting   IP IP Logged
a well wisher  
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar
Religion: Islam(Muslim)
Posts: 8577
Forum Rating: 0
Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 21 March 2013 at 6:59am
The Issue of Women

The issue of women has always been a priority in my commitment. I have kept questioning traditional interpretations and inviting Muslims to honest lucidity and critical reflection over the situation of women in Muslim majority societies and in communities settled in the West. The point was not to respond to Western criticisms by adopting a defensive (or altogether apologetic) attitude but to answer the requirement of intellectual probity and consistency. I have repeated this many times: Islam has no problem with women, but Muslims do clearly appear to have serious problems with them, and the reasons and sometimes the (questionable) justifications for this must be sought from within.

First, there is a double phenomenon at the source of all the theological and social constructions that have been established a posteriori. The issue of women is among those most widely affected by literalist readings of the Quran and of Prophetic traditions. Neglecting the fact that the Revelation took place in a given context and that its transmission over a period of twenty-three years determines an orientation as to divine pedagogy, literalist readings freeze the text out of its context, of its internal progression, and of the ends of the global message. They proceed by “reduction” and sometimes manage to justify interpretations that clearly contradict the overall message in its historical evolution or the model of behaviour set by the Prophet of Islam. Beyond unjustified practices (such as physical violence as already mentioned), reformist and literalist interpretations differ in their very conception of women, and of their identity and autonomy. Literalist interpretations integrate the patriarchal context of the time without any critical distance and associate women’s presence and role to their relation to men, while the reformist approach reaches out beyond the historical context to extract fundamental objectives as to women’s identity and their status as autonomous beings. Women should thus become subjects and master their own fates.

The study of the writings and commentaries of early ‘ulama (scholars), from Tabari to Abu Hamid al-Ghazali, clearly shows that they were greatly influenced by their cultural environment. One can often observe that they unwittingly proceed by “projection” on the Texts, their substance and their objectives. A contemporary faqih (Muslim jurist) or commentator must therefore perform a twofold dialectical analysis: the scriptural sources must first be read in light of their context, and then later commentaries must be read in light of the sociocultural contexts of the scholars who produced them. This process of deconstruction is difficult, but it makes it possible to critique the historical and cultural coating that has been projected onto primary sources. Thus, discourse about women has been widely influenced by patriarchal cultures, so that some cultural practices that were not “Islamic” have come to be justified. Female excision, forced marriages, honour crimes, for instance, are not Islamic even though certain scholars may have attempted to provide religious justification for them. This critical work is a long way from being completed, and awareness must be raised among Muslims and their fellow citizens about those confusions that lead to the original message being betrayed. This is why I cooperated with the Muslim organisation SPIOR from Rotterdam in launching a European campaign against forced marriages in May 2008: the point is to speak out and state forcefully that such practices (like excision, honour crimes, and others) are against Islam.

Moreover, the psychological dimension in the debate over women should not be downplayed. The relationship to the West is a complex one: before, during, then after colonisation, the issue of women has been central to power relations and political as well as theological and cultural debates. This has fostered a kind of reflex reaction in the contemporary Muslim psyche: the less Western the discourse about women, the more it is perceived as Islamic, and conversely, the more Islamic it is, the more it should be restrictive and oppose Western permissiveness whose objective is supposed to be to undermine religion and morals. Such an attitude has often prevented Muslim scholars and intellectuals from undertaking an autonomous, rigorous critique from within, stemming from a concern for reconciling Muslims with their own message and its ends. The point is not to be naive about relations of domination but indeed to get rid of the fear and alienation that keep thought static in order to stand apart from the others and refuse their control. Refusing “Western” domination by betraying one’s own religious message is an even more dangerous form of alienation since, in the process of resisting, one’s critical capacity, concern for consistency, and creative energy are lost. One ends up being defined only through the others,through their negative mirror: here, psychology wins out over liberation.

It is therefore important to carry out in-depth critical work and encourage women to become involved and acquire the religious learning necessary to develop new feminine readings. Women must be present in the religious community’s decision circles, in organisations, in mosque managing bodies, and other places. Things should be shaken up so that women can recover their proper place, but women themselves must also get organised: they will achieve nothing if they retain a victim mind-set. It is obvious today that wherever women have had access to schooling, have received Islamic education, or have become involved at the community or social level, they perform better than men: they achieve better results, they are more committed, more rigorous, and more earnest. Facts and figures speak for themselves. This process must go on and offer women full access to civil society and to employment with demands that should be taken for granted: similar training, similar qualification mean getting the same salary, and job discrimination (because a woman is too young and will probably have a child,or because she is too old and does not fit with the youthful “image”) must be rejected and fought against. Whether or not one calls it feminist (I do not mind), this commitment for women’s legitimate rights can and must take place from within.

Tariq Ramadan, What I believe

La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah
No Guest-Voting   IP IP Logged
a well wisher  
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar
Religion: Islam(Muslim)
Posts: 8577
Forum Rating: 0
Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 10 April 2013 at 8:23am

Prophet Muhammad(pbuh) in Muslim Hearts & non-Muslim Imagination

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mox4RhnFo3o

(About 96 mins)

La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah
No Guest-Voting   IP IP Logged
Al-Cordoby  
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar
Moderator
Religion: Islam(Muslim)
Posts: 27702
Forum Rating: 159
Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 16 April 2013 at 3:42pm
Believing in One Truth in a Pluralistic Society

This is a speech Dr. Ramadan gave last month at King's University College:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=58nuwSwveBQ

(124 minutes)

His talk starts at minute 8:00

Think Win-Win for a better world for all...

My Blog
Muslim Heritage

No Guest-Voting   IP IP Logged
Al-Cordoby  
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar
Moderator
Religion: Islam(Muslim)
Posts: 27702
Forum Rating: 159
Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 13 May 2013 at 11:17pm
Tariq Ramadan Talking About Knowledge at ISNA Convention (2011)

"We are not reading enough. You have books, but you don't read.

If you just come here to get knowledge, you will get very superficial knowledge, and this is just a fashion, new trend.

You need to come here to nurture your mind and heart with a deep question because tomorrow you will have to go back to books...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YuxjKCDgZoc

(10 minutes)

Think Win-Win for a better world for all...

My Blog
Muslim Heritage

No Guest-Voting   IP IP Logged
Al-Cordoby  
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar
Moderator
Religion: Islam(Muslim)
Posts: 27702
Forum Rating: 159
Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 15 May 2013 at 3:48pm
Dr. Ramadan on the Future of Excellence - March 2013

New Horizon Irvine : " The Future of Excellence " 16/03/2013

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wdZclW7GHLE

(60 minutes)

Think Win-Win for a better world for all...

My Blog
Muslim Heritage

No Guest-Voting   IP IP Logged
Al-Cordoby  
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar
Moderator
Religion: Islam(Muslim)
Posts: 27702
Forum Rating: 159
Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 17 May 2013 at 3:10pm

The Quest for Meaning and Pluralism

Tariq Ramadan, an Islamic scholar known for drawing thousands of people to events, filled a theatre and overflow room at SFU's Segal Graduate School of Business for his February 3rd talk, 2011.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XgW3vP7p3no

(53 minutes)
Think Win-Win for a better world for all...

My Blog
Muslim Heritage

No Guest-Voting   IP IP Logged
Al-Cordoby  
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar
Moderator
Religion: Islam(Muslim)
Posts: 27702
Forum Rating: 159
Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 04 June 2013 at 12:37am
Fasting and Spirituality: The Essence of Fasting in Islam

A talk on understanding fasting in Islam and its multiple dimensions by Dr. Tariq Ramadan

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IBEWGZS1bNk

(Part 1 - 9 minutes)

Think Win-Win for a better world for all...

My Blog
Muslim Heritage

No Guest-Voting   IP IP Logged
Al-Cordoby  
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar
Moderator
Religion: Islam(Muslim)
Posts: 27702
Forum Rating: 159
Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 13 June 2013 at 12:24am
Muslims, Humor and the Prophet Muhammad

On Monday, 29 October 2012, the Department of Religion Studies at the University of Johannesburg and the Mail and Guardian hosted Professor Tariq Ramadan for a public lecture on Muslims, Humor and the Prophet Muhammad.

The event was attended by over 300 people and was chaired by Professor Adam Habib, Deputy Vice-Chancellor of the University of Johannesburg.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ajSvfSBtTI4

(52 minutes)

Think Win-Win for a better world for all...

My Blog
Muslim Heritage

No Guest-Voting   IP IP Logged
Al-Cordoby  
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar
Moderator
Religion: Islam(Muslim)
Posts: 27702
Forum Rating: 159
Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote Al-Cordoby Replybullet Posted: 15 June 2013 at 5:23am

Rationality in Religious Texts

Dr. Tariq Ramadan answers a student's question on the Qur'an's involvement on influencing rational and irrational people

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=Gw9jIXGI078

(6 minutes)

Think Win-Win for a better world for all...

My Blog
Muslim Heritage

No Guest-Voting   IP IP Logged
<< Prev Page  of 18 Next >>
Post Reply Post New Topic
Printable version Printable version

Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot create polls in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

Bulletin Board Software by Web Wiz Forums version 8.03
Copyright ©2001-2006 Web Wiz Guide
Disclaimer
The opinions expressed by members of the Whyislam Forum do not necessarily reflect the beliefs of the Whyislam Team, or any of its subsidiaries, or parent organizations.