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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 12 November 2014 at 2:34am
prophetic Guidelines for caring for the Environment

1.Plant a tree even if it is your last deed.

2.Planting trees is a renewable source of Hasanat.

3.Conserve resources even when used for rituals.

4.Keeping environment clean is important.

5.No for Over-Consumption!Consider recycling and fixing before buying new items.

6.Animals should be cared for...

The green hadiths mentioned in the context...


http://www.onislam.net/english/oimedia/onislamen/images/media/2014/glimpses-from-the-prophet-part-1.pdf

(Page 19-24)
La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah
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Escaping the Matrix
By Richard K. Moore     


Richard K. Moore is an expatriate software programmer from Silicon Valley who has lived for the past six years in rural Ireland. However, capitalizing on one of the better side effects of globalization, he and Canadian collaborator Jan Slakov have coordinated Internet discussions about new economic and political paradigms among hundreds of people worldwide, via e-mail lists and the Citizens for a Democratic Renaissance Web site. This article is a distillation of Moore's book-in-progress, which can be found in fuller form at http://cyberjournal.org. Richard can be reached at richard@cyberjournal.org.

The defining dramatic moment in the film The Matrix [Warner Bros., 1999] occurs just after Morpheus invites Neo to choose between a red pill and a blue pill. The red pill promises "the truth, nothing more." Neo takes the red pill and awakes to reality?something utterly different from anything Neo, or the audience, could have expected. What Neo had assumed to be reality turns out to be only a collective illusion, fabricated by the Matrix and fed to a population that is asleep, cocooned in grotesque embryonic pods. In Plato's famous parable about the shadows on the walls of the cave, true reality is at least reflected in perceived reality. In the Matrix world, true reality and perceived reality exist on entirely different planes.

The story is intended as metaphor, and the parallels that drew my attention had to do with political reality. This article offers a particular perspective on what's going on in the world and how things got to be that way in this era of globalization. From that red-pill perspective, everyday media-consensus reality like the Matrix in the film is seen to be a fabricated collective illusion. Like Neo, I didn't know what I was looking for when my investigation began, but I knew that what I was being told didn't make sense. I read scores of histories and biographies, observing connections between them, and began to develop my own theories about roots of various historical events.

I found myself largely in agreement with writers like Noam Chomsky and Michael Parenti, but I also perceived important patterns that others seemed to have missed. When I started tracing historical forces, and began to interpret present-day events from a historical perspective, I could see the same old dynamics at work and found a meaning in unfolding events far different from what official pronouncements proclaimed. Such pronouncements are, after all, public relations fare, given out by politicians who want to look good to the voters. Most of us expect rhetoric from politicians, and take what they say with a grain of salt. But as my own picture of present reality came into focus, "grain of salt" no longer worked as a metaphor. I began to see that consensus reality as generated by official rhetoric and amplified by mass media bears very little relationship to actual reality. "The matrix" was a metaphor I was ready for.

In consensus reality (the blue-pill perspective) "left" and "right" are the two ends of the political spectrum. Politics is a tug-of-war between competing factions, carried out by political parties and elected representatives. Society gets pulled this way and that within the political spectrum, reflecting the interests of whichever party won the last election. The left and right are therefore political enemies. Each side is convinced that it knows how to make society better; each believes the other enjoys undue influence; and each blames the other for the political stalemate that apparently prevents society from dealing effectively with its problems.

This perspective on the political process, and on the roles of left and right, is very far from reality. It is a fabricated collective illusion. Morpheus tells Neo that the Matrix is "the world that was pulled over your eyes to hide you from the truth....As long as the Matrix exists, humanity cannot be free." Consensus political reality is precisely such a matrix. Later we will take a fresh look at the role of left and right, and at national politics. But first we must develop our red-pill historical perspective. I've had to condense the arguments to bare essentials; please see the annotated sources at the end for more thorough treatments of particular topics...

http://www.wholeearth.com/issue/2101/article/130/escaping.the.matrix
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The Economics of Happiness Film Trailer




The Economics of Happiness describes a world moving simultaneously in two opposing directions. On the one hand, government and big business continue to promote globalization and the consolidation of corporate power. At the same time, people around the world are resisting those policies – and, far from the old institutions of power, they’re starting to forge a very different future. Communities are coming together to re-build more human scale, ecological economies based on a new paradigm – an economics of localization.





http://www.theeconomicsofhappiness.org
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What is Ecopedagogy?

Ecopedagogy is a discourse, a movement, and an approach to education that has emerged from leftist educators in Central and South America including Paulo Freire, Moacir Gadotti and Leonardo Boff that seeks to re-educate “planetary citizens” to care for, respect and take action for all life. How can we, as citizens of the planet, participate in the creation of a world that we want instead of simply observing those who are profiting off of extraction and exploitation create our world for us? What does an education look like that can encourage people to face what is happening, take responsibility for ourselves and work to create healthy, vibrant resilient communities that serve everyone, no one excluded. What kind of education is really relevant today, given our current social and ecological crisis? How is traditional environmental education not relevant? These are some of the questions that are asked by ecopedagogy, which it attempts respond to.

Okay, but what is it really?

As a movement and an approach to education, Ecopedagogy is alive; it is open and fluid to be defined by its practitioners who engage critically with it. In this way it remains continuously relevant. There are however, some basic principles outlined in the Ecopedagogy Charter, which have been elaborated and interpreted by subsequent works. Some of these principles include;

Popular Education: Ecopedagogy is an extension of Paulo Freire’s seminal work, Pedagogy of the Oppressed. Many of the concepts of power and oppression are expanded to include the non-human world as oppressed as well. As a heir of Pedagogy of the Oppressed, Ecopedagogy is grounded in popular education in which power is shared, participatory dialogue is the key methodology, learning leads to action, and learning starts from and responds to the learner’s lived experiences.


Post-Issue activism: Issues of social and economic justice, democracy and ecologal integrity intersect and are interdependent. Ultimately none of them are possible without all of them intact. Educators can choose which ever issue their learners are most personally connected with however as an “entry point” or location to start from to then move towards an integrated understanding of the others.


Planetary Citizenship: Our lived reality is becoming globalized, we should globalize our sense of community, responsibilities and our commitments as well.


Art Education: Ecopedagogy encourages people to develop the capacity to feel, intuit, imagine, create, relate, and express themselves. In this way we move from object to subject, able to participate in articulating and creating the world we want. This implies that the multiple languages/ intelligences of theatre, music, visual art, photography, dance etc. are fundamental to engage with as tools of expression and creation in the educational project.


Care: Dis-care of each other and of the planet has contributed to our current planetary crisis. Care can “conjure the strength to search for peace in the midsts of conflict”, “rescue the dignity of the condemned” and “permit a revolution of tenderness to prioritize the social over the individual.” ~Leonardo Boff, “Saber Cuidar”.


"Unless and until we have assigned meaning to our experience of our place, the earth, our bodies, the world as holy- we cast meaning outside of ourselves to “the closest and shiniest thing” Modern reference point for meaning and identity is consistently placed onto external authority, the media and fads, instead of from within. We need fellowship and communion- we are given a grafted version of “common experience”- but this does not offer relationship with the earth or communities." ~ Frank MacEowen



http://www.practicingfreedom.org/offerings/ecopedagogy/
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“How people themselves perceive what they are doing is not a question that interests me. I mean, there are very few people who are going to look into the mirror and say, 'That person I see is a savage monster'; instead, they make up some construction that justifies what they do. If you ask the CEO of some major corporation what he does he will say, in all honesty, that he is slaving 20 hours a day to provide his customers with the best goods or services he can and creating the best possible working conditions for his employees. But then you take a look at what the corporation does, the effect of its legal structure, the vast inequalities in pay and conditions, and you see the reality is something far different.”

“Modern industrial civilisation has developed within a certain system of convenient myths. The driving force of modern industrial civilisation has been individual material gain, which is accepted as legitimate, even praiseworthy, on the grounds that private vices yield public benefits in the classic formulation.

Now, it's long been understood very well that a society that is based on this principle will destroy itself in time. It can only persist with whatever suffering and injustice it entails as long as it's possible to pretend that the destructive forces that humans create are limited: that the World is an infinite resource, and that the World is an infinite garbage-can. At this stage of History, either one of two things is possible: either the general population will take control of its own destiny and will concern itself with community-interests, guided by values of solidarity and sympathy and concern for others; or, alternatively, there will be no destiny for anyone to control.

As long as some specialised class is in a position of authority, it is going to set policy in the special interests that it serves. But the conditions of survival, let alone justice, require rational social planning in the interests of the community as a whole and, by now, that means the Global Community. The question is whether privileged élites should dominate mass-communication, and should use this power as they tell us they must, namely, to impose necessary illusions, manipulate and deceive the stupid majority, and remove them from the public arena. The question, in brief, is whether Democracy and Freedom are values to be preserved or threats to be avoided. In this possibly-terminal phase of human existence, Democracy and Freedom are more than values to be treasured, they may well be essential to survival.”

“Responsibility I believe accrues through privilege. People like you and me have an unbelievable amount of privilege and therefore we have a huge amount of responsibility. We live in free societies where we are not afraid of the police; we have extraordinary wealth available to us by global standards. If you have those things, then you have the kind of responsibility that a person does not have if he or she is slaving seventy hours a week to put food on the table; a responsibility at the very least to inform yourself about power. Beyond that, it is a question of whether you believe in moral certainties or not.”

“..people would like to think there's somebody up there who knows what he's doing. Since we don't participate, we don't control and we don't even think about the questions of crucial importance, we hope somebody is paying attention who has some competence. Let's hope the ship has a captain, in other words, since we're not taking in deciding what's going on. I think that's a factor. But also, it is an important feature of the ideological system to impose on people the feeling that they are incompetent to deal with these complex and important issues; they'd better leave it to the captain. One device is to develop a star system, an array of figures who are often media creations or creations of the academic propaganda establishment, whose deep insights we are supposed to admire and to whom we must happily and confidently assign the right to control our lives and control international affairs.”

“...the qualifications that I have to speak on world affairs are exactly the same ones Henry Kissinger has, and Walt Rostow has, or anybody in the Political Science Department, professional historians—none, none that you don't have. The only difference is, I don't pretend to have qualifications, nor do I pretend that qualifications are needed. I mean, if somebody were to ask me to give a talk on quantum physics, I'd refuse—because I don't understand enough. But world affairs are trivial: there's nothing in the social sciences or history or whatever that is beyond the intellectual capacities of an ordinary fifteen-year-old. You have to do a little work, you have to do some reading, you have to be able to think but there's nothing deep—if there are any theories around that require some special kind of training to understand, then they've been kept a carefully guarded secret.”

“Look, part of the whole technique of disempowering people is to make sure that the real agents of change fall out of history, and are never recognized in the culture for what they are. So it's necessary to distort history and make it look as if Great Men did everything - that's part of how you teach people they can't do anything, they're helpless, they just have to wait for some Great Man to come along and do it for them.”


“We shouldn't be looking for heroes, we should be looking for good ideas.”


“All over the place, from the popular culture to the propaganda system, there is constant pressure to make people feel that they are helpless, that the only role they can have is to ratify decisions and to consume.
Neoliberal democracy. Instead of citizens, it produces consumers. Instead of communities, it produces shopping malls. The net result is an atomized society of disengaged individuals who feel demoralized and socially powerless."

“If you assume that there is no hope, you guarantee that there will be no hope. If you assume that there is an instinct for freedom, that there are opportunities to change things, then there is a possibility that you can contribute to making a better world.Optimism is a strategy for making a better future. Because unless you believe that the future can be better, you are unlikely to step up and take responsibility for making it so.”




― Noam Chomsky
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ON TRANSFORMING OUR WORLD:
Critical Pedagogy for Interfaith Education



Religions, as traditions and bodies of thought, ethics, and practices, persuade adherents to look beyond themselves as individuals and consider their wider connectedness. Religious identities are communal in nature. They assert a shared humanity and compel a critical examination of our obligations to others in our own communities and beyond our own communities.

However, valuable resources offered by religions are often overshadowed by the struggles religious traditions face both internally and in their relationships with each other. Interfaith education finds its greatest challenges in addressing the hegemonic tendencies of religions, through which one tradition has dominated another; the histories of violence found within many of our religious traditions; and the exclusivist and triumphalist strands within religious traditions that promote intolerance and discrimination. There is a need to acknowledge the role of power both among and within religious traditions.How we define the religious other may have less to do with the other than it does with 'our' world, our own religious tradition. It is important then that we work to uncover the biases and assumptions that inform our thinking, and that we recognize the ways in which we might be tacitly complicit, or actively involved, in reinforcing oppression and hegemony. Yet, creating educational practices that address these issues is challenging.

Critical pedagogy is a pedagogical method, philosophy, and movement that has been developed within the past thirty or so years. This pedagogical approach seeks to promote educational experiences that are transformative, empowering, transgressive, and even subversive. Paulo Freire's Pedagogy of the Oppressed, which aims at helping students find a sense of agency in their lives through the process of "conscientization," is generally regarded as the foundational text of this approach."

From Freire's "pedagogy of the oppressed" to bell hooks's feminist pedagogy which aims at promoting "education as the practice of freedom," critical pedagogy has taken many forms. While it is difficult to arrive at a single definition of critical pedagogy, the various approaches to critical pedagogy share common themes. One is the questioning of how power operates in the construction of knowledge. As bell hooks explains, "More than ever before . . . educators are compelled to confront the biases that have shaped teaching practices in our society and to create new ways of knowing, different strategies for the sharing of knowledge."This involves rethinking a number of aspects of educational practices, including who makes the decisions about what and how to learn, who does the talking, and who takes the responsibility for learning. It also entails reassessing by who and how learning is gauged. Henry Giroux, another important theorist of critical pedagogy, identifies a common set of problems that various approaches to critical pedagogy all address in some way. "These problems include but are not limited to the relationship between knowledge and power, language and experience, ethics and authority, student agency and transformative politics, and teacher location and student formations."

Palmer tells us, "Because reality is communal, we learn best by interacting with it."

There is a need to explore the positive potential that religions have to offer our world. Far too often in our society today, people focus on the negative contributions that religions make to the world—fanaticism, zealotry, and triumphalism leading to discrimination, conflict and violence. Many people are so accustomed to this negative spin that they believe these tendencies reflect the true nature of religions, rather than a distortion of religions. Yet, many of the greatest leaders and social reformers of our time have been motivated by religious convictions—Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Dorothy Day, Mahatma Gandhi, Nelson Mandela.

The promise of critical interfaith pedagogy at its best is a process of engaging difference, coming to know others and ourselves, realizing the claims of community upon our lives, and providing the impetus and even the resources to work for constructive social change. As educators cultivate critical interfaith education, we are cultivating the capacity to transform our world.


http://www.crosscurrents.org/Puett2005.htm
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“They’re driven by love. And they’re fierce.”
From Native activists to urban youth, new leadership finds ways to deal with climate chaos.


The climate crisis is no longer a future danger: Extreme weather, water shortages, heat waves, and flooding are here now. And the impacts of burning fossil fuels continue to worsen.



Why has it taken so long to respond? Naomi Klein’s new book, This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. the Climate, explores that question. Klein points to the “terrible timing” of the climate crisis coming into public awareness—with NASA scientist James Hansen’s 1988 testimony to Congress—right at the time free-market “neoliberal” ideology was on the rise. This ideology led to:

1) Anti-government sentiment, austerity budgets, tax cuts, and deregulation, which undercut government’s ability to lead a transition to a clean economy and to protect residents from climate impacts.

2) Global trade deals that override environmental regulations and local green-jobs initiatives.

3) Privatization of sectors needed to transition to renewables.

But Germany has gone the other direction, Klein reports. Taking back their electric utilities helped Germany generate a record 27 percent of electricity from renewables this year. Unlike many who write about climate change, Klein goes beyond analysis of the crisis. She reports on the grassroots activists who are standing up to the coal, tar sands, and gas industries and building alternatives that are green and just. These are the powerful people’s movements that together, she says, could “change everything.”


van Gelder: You talk in your book about the “unfinished liberation struggles.” Many of the people’s movements we celebrate—civil rights, anti-apartheid, women’s rights—succeeded in some ways, but failed to win economic power. Did you see in the People’s Climate March renewed attention to these “unfinished liberation struggles”?

Klein: The kind of hope that climate action represents—to people in the South Bronx and other low-income communities of color in the U.S., but also in countries like Bolivia—is because it directly addresses foundational issues around why our societies are so unequal. Colonialism predates coal, but coal supercharged the colonial project, allowing the pillaging of the Global South, and locked us into these incredibly unequal extractive relationships.


We in the Global North have built up an ecological debt. Fossil fuels built the modern world. And the countries that have a 200-year head start on emitting carbon have a special responsibility to both cut emissions first and fastest, and also to help countries that have not been contributing to this problem for nearly as long to leapfrog over fossil fuels and not be forced to choose between poverty and pollution. This is a process by which we begin to heal these colonial wounds.

And so, yeah, I talk about this as the unfinished business of liberation because so many of the past great social movements won on the legal and cultural sides but not on the economic side. There never were reparations for slavery. There never were the investments in the public sphere that the Civil Rights movement demanded.

So the dream is that in responding to climate change through a justice lens—through a lens that is not afraid to look at history and the real roots of inequality—we build a movement of movements that brings together all of these struggles. The hope is that climate is the biggest tent—it’s our atmosphere. We just have to know we’re all in the tent.

http://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/cities-are-now/naomi-klein-on-climate-heroes-who-inspire-her
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Degrowth, the Book

In industrialized societies, where so many people regard economic growth as the essence of human progress, the idea of deliberately rejecting growth is seen as insane. Yet that is more or less what the planet’s ecosystems are saying right now about the world economy.

The editors -- Giacomo D’Alisa, Federico Demaria, Giorgios Kallis – are three scholars at the Autonomous University of Barcelona, Spain, and members of the group Research & Degrowth. The editors describe degrowth as “a rejection of the illusion of growth and a call to repoliticize the public debate colonized by the idiom of economism.” The basic idea is to find new ways to achieve “the democratically-led shrinking of production and consumption with the aim of achieving social justice and ecological sustainability.”

Here’s how the book jacket describes the volume:

We live in an era of stagnation, rapid impoverishment, rising inequalities and socio-ecological disasters. In the dominant discourse, these are effects of economic crisis, lack of growth or underdevelopment. This book argues that growth is the cause of these problems and that it has become uneconomic, ecologically unsustainable and intrinsically unjust.

When the language in use is inadequate to articulate what begs to be articulated, then it is time for a new vocabulary. A movement of activists and intellectuals, first starting in France and then spreading to the rest of the world, has called for the decolonization of public debate from the idiom of economism and the abolishment of economic growth as a social objective. ‘Degrowth’ (‘décroissance’) has come to signify for them the desired direction of societies that will use fewer natural resources and will organize themselves to live radically differently. ‘Simplicity’, ‘conviviality’, ‘autonomy’, ‘care’, ‘commons’ and ‘dépense’ are some of the words that express what a degrowth society might look like.


http://bollier.org/blog/degrowth-book
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Wendell Berry


http://tune.pk/video/5769569/wendell-berry


Edited by a well wisher - 26 January 2015 at 6:55am
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“The deep ecologists warn us not to be anthropocentric, but I know no way to look at the world, settled or wild, except through my own human eyes. I know that is wasn't created especially for my use, and I share the guilt for what members of my species, especially the migratory ones, have done to it. But I am the only instrument that I have access to by which I can enjoy the world and try to understand it. So I must believe that, at least to human perception, a place is not a place until people have been born in it, have grown up in it, have lived in it, known it, died in it--have both experienced and shaped it, as individuals, families, neighborhoods, and communities, over more than one generation. Some are born in their place, some find it, some realize after long searching that the place they left is the one they have been searching for. But whatever their relation to it, it is made a place only by slow accrual, like a coral reef.”

“We have been cut off, the past has been ended and the family has broken up and the present is adrift in its wheelchair. ... That is no gap between the generations, that is a gulf. The elements have changed, there are whole new orders of magnitude and kind. [...]

My grandparents had to live their way out of one world and into another, or into several others, making new out of old the way corals live their reef upward. I am on my grandparents' side. I believe in Time, as they did, and in the life chronological rather than in the life existential. We live in time and through it, we build our huts in its ruins, or used to, and we cannot afford all these abandonings.”


“It is not an unusual life curve for Westerners - to live i n and be shaped by the bigness, sparseness, space clarity & hopefulness of the West, to go away for study and enlargement and the perspective that distance and dissatisfaction can give, and then to return to what pleases the sight and enlists the loyalty and demands the commitment.”



“The moderns, carrying little baggage of the kind that Shelly called "merely cultural," not even living in the traditional air, but breathing into their space helmets a scientific mixture of synthetic gases (and polluted at that) are the true pioneers. Their circuitry seems to include no atavistic domestic sentiment, they have suffered empathectomy, their computers hum no ghostly feedback of Home, Sweet Home. How marvelously free they are! How unutterably deprived!”

“[The modern age] knows nothing about isolation and nothing about silence. In our quietest and loneliest hour the automatic ice-maker in the refrigerator will cluck and drop an ice cube, the automatic dishwasher will sigh through its changes, a plane will drone over, the nearest freeway will vibrate the air. Red and white lights will pass in the sky, lights will shine along highways and glance off windows. There is always a radio that can be turned to some all-night station, or a television set to turn artificial moonlight into the flickering images of the late show. We can put on a turntable whatever consolation we most respond to, Mozart or Copland or the Grateful Dead.”

"We simply need that wild country available to us, even if we never do more than drive to its edge and look in. For it can be a means of reassuring ourselves of our sanity as creatures, a part of the geography of hope."

"The wilderness idea has helped form our character and has shaped our history as a people. It has no more to do with recreation than churches have to do with recreation. Something will have gone out of us as a people if we ever let the remaining wilderness be destroyed, if we permit the last virgin forests to be turned into comic books and plastic cigarette cases, if we drive the few remaining species into zoos, or to extinction, if we pollute the last clear air and dirty the last clean streams and push our paved roads through the last of the silence, so that never again will Americans be free in their own country, from the noise, the exhaust, the stinks of human and automotive waste, and so that never again can we have the chance to see ourselves single, separate, vertical and individual in the world, part of the environment of trees and rocks and soil, brother to the other animals, part of the natural world and competent to belong in it."

"Without any remaining wilderness we are committed wholly, without chance for even momentary reflection and rest, to a headlong drive into our technological termite life, the brave new world of a completely man-controlled environment. We need wilderness preserved, as much of it as is still left and as many kinds because it was the challenge against which our character as a people was formed. The reminder and reassurance that it is still there is good for our spiritual health even if we never once in 10 years set foot in it. It is good for us when we are young because of the incomparable sanity it can bring briefly as vacation and rest into our insane lives. It is important to us when we are old simply because it is there. Important that it is, simply as idea. The frontier was necessary. For an American, insofar as he is new any different at all, is a civilized man who has renewed himself in the wild."


“[Y]ou were too alert to the figurative possibilities of words not to see the phrase [angle of repose] as descriptive of human as well as detrital rest. As you said, it was too good for mere dirt; you tried to apply it to your own wandering and uneasy life ... I wonder if you ever reached it...”

― Wallace Stegner


Edited by a well wisher - 27 January 2015 at 8:10pm
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TRANSCRIPT FOR SETH GODIN — THE ART OF NOTICING, AND THEN CREATING

MS. TIPPETT: I want to start with where I usually start my interviews, whoever I'm talking to. And actually in all that I've seen you write across the years, I haven't heard you talk about this too much. Was there a spiritual background to your childhood?

MR. GODIN: Well, I grew up with two incredible parents and learned a lot about faith. There wasn't a lot of religion and there was a lot of faith. And that dichotomy I think is really important, and it's informed a lot of the way I lived and what I've written about. And by faith I mean faith in community, faith in charity and in philanthropy, faith in innovation and what happens when people make a ruckus or do hard work, faith in education, faith in taking initiative. I mean I was a free-range kid...

I grew up in the this house where there was this understanding that if someone didn't have a place to go they stayed with you. And that if there was a way to help, you helped. And, you know, we weren't the most well-off people in town, but my parents understood that they had a position and a role in the community, and any chance they had to lead was one that they should take. And if they had a chance to support someone or connect with someone, they should.


MR. GODIN: Well, the reason I know it's true is because all I do for a living is notice things. And there's one view of the world — call it the Walmart view — that says that what people want, what all people want is as much as stuff as possible for as cheap a price as possible. And if you look at the world through that lens — and there are plenty of people who do — you can come up with a strategy to achieve that. And that's Black Friday sales and that's self-storage units. And that's somebody who's happy to push you to buy something you don't need. Because the object of the game is for them to have more stuff. And that's a world based on scarcity. I don't have enough stuff, how do I get more stuff?

MS. TIPPETT: Right.

MR. GODIN: There's a different view and we see it in so many places, but it doesn't get a lot of press — which is the view not based on scarcity but based on abundance. That in an abundance economy we, the thing we don't have enough of is we don't have enough connection — we're lonely. And we don't have enough time. And if people can offer us connection and meaning and a place where we can be our best selves — yes, we will seek that out. No, it probably doesn't help you build a big profitable public company, but yes, it helps you make a better difference to the community that you've chosen to live in.

MS. TIPPETT: Something that I'm really intrigued by — that I feel you're adding to — is this sense or this knowledge that we all have that we are living in a moment of great flux. We are living in evolutionary times. I read as I was digging into you that Charles Darwin was a really formative figure for you.

MR. GODIN: Yeah. People impart a lot into the notion of evolution — some of which wasn't Darwin's work itself. But what is important here is not only do times change, but those times change, not just our stories about ourselves and our expectations, but they actually are changing our brain. So you know, when the Industrial Revolution came, there were 20 years when basically everyone in Manchester, England, was an alcoholic. Instead of having like coffee carts, they had gin carts that went up and down the streets. Because it was so hard to shift from being a farmer to sitting in a dark room for 12 hours every day doing what you were told. But we evolved, we culturally evolved to be able to handle a New World Order. And so when we talk about evolution as a metaphorical thing where we have memetics and ideas laid on top of this idea of survival of the species and things changing over time, what fascinates me about it is that this bottom-up change in the world is everywhere all the time. So much more common than change that gets put down on us by a dictator or by someone who's putatively in charge.

MS. TIPPETT: Right.

MR. GODIN: And yet we ignore this bottom-up thing when in fact it's the thing we are most likely to be able to touch and change.

That — the Linux operating system, which is on a billion computers around the world, was written by a group of strangers who have never met, who are part of the same tribe. And so the challenge of our future is to say, are we going to connect and amplify positive tribes that want to make things better for all of us? Or are we going to degrade to warring tribes that are willing to bring other groups down just so they can get ahead?


http://www.onbeing.org/program/seth-godin-the-art-of-noticing-and-then-creating/transcript/7080
La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 30 January 2015 at 5:42pm
When My Husband Was Fired, I Felt Shame—Then Gratitude

I had grown up identifying joblessness with shame and failure. But here we were, on the other side of the employment equation, and for the first moment in my grown-up life, everything felt … right. We felt surprisingly safe. We felt creative. We were suddenly intellectually engaged. We were stimulated by our environment and by the challenges ahead. We spent the day tromping through the snow, exploring the forests and fields surrounding our new home, oblivious to time.

The coming days were graced with loving visits from family, neighborly gifts of food and winter vegetables, kind notes, offers of short-term work, tips on job leads, and words of encouragement. My conclusion that the community didn’t want us was wrong. What we soon learned, as Bob continued to seek (but not find) secure employment and I finished school and unsuccessfully sought work, was that the community did want us. But the economy didn’t.

That was an important lesson. As a result, what took hold in our souls on November 1, 1999, ultimately became a choice to take a role in a nationwide radical homemaking movement. For the uninitiated, this is a conscious attempt to live an ecologically responsible life and insist that family, community, and the fair treatment of others govern our daily choices. Interestingly, while on this path, we have endured countless accusations that we are at the vanguard of a movement that is causing women and men to “withdraw from society.” As an advocate of radical homemaking, I have been accused of helping others to live a home-centered life, thereby robbing society of intelligent citizens’ talents and education.

Moving forward without the cushion of a steady paycheck was our first step toward rebuilding a new kind of economy in our community.
The outdated assumption in this critique is that home is separate from society. This separation is an invention of the industrial revolution, when men were the first members of the household pushed out to find work. Prior to industrialization, home was the foundation of society, from the time the feudal system began breaking down in Europe onward. Here in the United States, our nation was founded on hearth and home. The self-reliance of American homesteads is what empowered our forefathers to overthrow colonial rule. It is what built our young nation.

Contrary to the criticisms, radical homemakers are not removing themselves from society. They are removing themselves from the modern extractive economy. This is an economy that outpaces the capacity of our planet, that commands the vast majority of people to clamor for jobs that demand well beyond 40 hours of work per week, and that disregards the importance of family and community as a basic human entitlement. It should not be confused with society...

The extractive economy may value public volunteer service, but not the private care of family. It may value certain well-compensated career choices, but not the less glamorous work of tilling soil, pulling weeds, tending livestock, stacking firewood, helping neighbors, or even cooking and cleaning (two activities without which no human society can function). Also, the accusation that radical homemakers are withdrawing from society overlooks the entrepreneurial work that many of us do to create a life-serving economy, whether it is starting an online business, opening up a farmer’s market stall, or bartering skills and resources with neighbors.

All of these small entrepreneurial ventures, coupled with the efforts to restore the family hearth and community life, are the work of radical homemakers. The result will be a society where people are secure; where their locally centered daily lives are buffered from the throes of global economic forces; and where “getting fired” is understood as being “set free.”

http://www.yesmagazine.org/happiness/when-my-husband-was-fired-from-his-job-i-felt-shame-then-gratitude

Edited by a well wisher - 30 January 2015 at 5:45pm
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Rating: 0 of 0 votes Quote a well wisher Replybullet Posted: 15 February 2015 at 4:00am
Functional Medicine

I just did a blog post where I mentioned this and you’ll see that there’s a functional medicine systems model that I developed. It’s a series of concentric circles. It’s the way that I understand how disease develops. The core of that circle is environment. Another word for it actually that’s fairly new is called the exposome. This is what scientists are using now to refer to the sum total of environmental influences. That’s everything that’s nongenetic. So it could range from diet during our lifetime. But not only that, it’s our mother’s diet during her lifetime and our father’s diet prior to conception, which we now know influences our health. Mother’s diet during pregnancy. It’s early life influences, like whether we were born vaginally or via C-section, whether we were breastfed or fed formula, stress levels of our primary caregivers. Then the status of our gut flora, our exposure to antibiotics and other medications early on in life, that would have influenced the development of our gut flora. Our exercise and physical activity, stress levels, exposure to environmental toxins like mercury amalgams, BPA, volatile organic compounds, pesticides. It’s pretty mind-blowing to think of that, but that’s all encompassed within this term called the exposome, environmental influences.

Then the next ring out from that are genetics and epigenetics. The environmental influences that we’re subjected to or exposed to interact with our unique genome and epigenome, to then express or manifest in certain underlying patterns or mechanisms of disease. So these could be blood sugar dysregulation, autoimmunity, problems with methylation, digestive issues, leaky gut. Then these mechanisms, in turn, express certain diseases. So diabetes, heart disease, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), all the things that Western medicine is kind of focused on. Of course, these diseases and mechanisms then ultimately express themselves as symptoms that we experience as people and patients.

When you understand disease and health from that perspective, then that can serve as the framework for how you go about treating patients in the clinic, and then how I would go about teaching you how to do that in the training program. The first module that we’re hopefully going to launch in the spring, maybe late spring of next year, is going to be all about the exposome or environment. So how to modify all of the modifiable environmental factors to create the healthiest starting place, core fundamental foundation for health. That will be looking at how to change diet, lifestyle, and some of these other influences for a whole variety of health conditions and needs. So for someone who comes to see you and they have Hashimoto’s, they have a number of symptoms, but they’re also training for some competition, how do you address that person? How do you address someone who wants to lose weight, but who tried a low-carb diet, and it’s not working for them? How do you address somebody that has high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and their doctor wants to put them on medication? What are the sorts of things, interventions that you can do for that person to normalize their function without resorting to medication? This will be heavily focused on ancestral, you know, nutrient-dense diets, you can call it Paleo, Paleo-based. But as anyone listening to this knows, I’m not dogmatic about Paleo, it’s more of a starting place and a template for me than anything else. When it comes down to it, this is at least 80% of what you should be doing in any clinical encounter, no matter if you’re a doctor, a nutritionist, osteopath, or naturopath. If you address these core environmental factors in your patients or clients, you’re going to heal 80% of people. Even in a complex patient, you’re going to deal with 80% of the difficulty that they’re experiencing.


http://chriskresser.com/how-to-build-a-career-in-paleo-functional-medicine
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The Sociology of Dead Children

Experts have put urban violence under the microscope. You might call it the sociology of dead kids.

There's a lot less here than meets the eye, or so it seemed when I read about a new study by researchers at Yale called "Tragic, but not random: The social contagion of nonfatal gunshot injuries." It's an attempt to create categories of likely future shooting victims in Chicago and, thus, determine who among us is most in danger. Well, sure, why not? But in the process, the study, at least as it was reported a few days ago in the Chicago Sun-Times, utterly depersonalized the potential victims, along with the communities in which they lived, reducing them to components in a mathematical formula.

The researchers "sought to go beyond a racial explanation for nonfatal shootings," according to the Sun-Times. "They were trying to explain why a specific young African-American male in a high-crime neighborhood becomes a shooting victim, while another young black man in the same neighborhood doesn't, the study said."

It was all so cold and "scientific," so grandly removed from the hoo-hah of growing up in the big city - of life, death, guns, gangs, poverty and the criminal justice system. As we go about the business of trying to create meaningful lives, it turns out that disinterested mega-forces, as impersonal as gravity, are colluding to determine our fate. Don't worry. Scientists are studying these forces. They'll get them figured out. Meanwhile, go shopping. Or whatever.

Yeah, that was it. What ground against my sensibilities wasn't the science itself, but its transmutation, via the clueless media, into popular culture. The omnipresent assumption of the mainstream media is that you and I are "consumers" - consumers, ultimately, of reality itself - and we live in our culture and our world as spectators rather than participants. This means the reality that's conveyed to us is simplistic and gawk-worthy, rather than complex, multidimensional and evolving. Such news promotes and prolongs the status quo, including the troubles embedded therein, even when it purports to report on solutions to these troubles.

This is our world and it feels, increasingly, like a cul-de-sac without empathy. Shortly after I read about the sociology of dead children, I read about the death of 13-year-old Mohammed Tuaiman, who lived in Yemen. The boy was killed by a U.S. drone attack at the end of January. His death had news value because, a few weeks earlier, he had spoken to Western journalists, according to a story at Common Dreams, "about his pervasive fear of the U.S. drones flying overhead. .

"Mohammed's father and one of his brothers were killed by a U.S. drone in 2011, which sparked the young boy's fear of what he called the U.S. 'death machines.' Subsequently interviewed by the Guardian, and given a camera in order to document his life in war-torn Yemen, Mohammed spoke earnestly and openly about the dangers and fears that plagued his life."

The connection between the two stories is intuitive, but not random. The level of thinking in each is the same: impersonal control, maintenance of security from a distance. How long before the "manpower-strapped" Chicago Police Department begins employing drone technology to keep its eye on the city's scientifically determined at-risk young people?

Missing from the Sun-Times story was any mention of community, at least as something organic and protective. Also missing were words such as valuing, listening, respecting - without which, my God, security for anyone is a travesty. Missing also was any mention of militarized police or our national obsession with war. These are the forces of dehumanization and they put all of us at risk.




http://www.iviews.com/Articles/articles.asp?ref=IV1502-6016
La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah
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