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bullet Posted: 16 October 2017 at 2:33pm
The Rise of Islamophobia @ The Carter Center (Sept. 26, 2017)

Islamophobia and violent extremism are inextricably linked.

As Islamophobia continues to grip much of the Western world, join us in discussing the effects of stigmatizing Muslims and learn more about what The Carter Center and others are doing to help stem the tide of anti-Muslim hatred and discrimination.

Moderated by Dr. Houda Abadi, associate director of the Carter Center’s Conflict Resolution Program, panelists include:

- Dr. Suzanne Barakat: motivational speaker and the sister of Deah Barakat, one of three Muslims killed during a 2015 shooting in Chapel Hill

- Dr. Deepa Kumar: award-winning scholar and activist, and author of “Islamophobia and the Politics of Empire”

- Dr. Tariq Ramadan: contemporary Islamic studies scholar who was named one of Time magazine’s 100 most influential people in the world in 2004

Founded in 1982 by former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and former First Lady Rosalynn Carter in partnership with Emory University, The Carter Center is committed to advancing human rights and alleviating unnecessary human suffering.

The Center wages peace, fights disease, and builds hope worldwide.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c-UGQK7nadA

(72 minutes)


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bullet Posted: 15 November 2017 at 5:04am
New 2017 Report on Islamophobia, UK

Two decades since Runnymede was first credited with coining the term 'Islamophobia' in our flagship 1997 report, we look at how the phenomenon has evolved over the past 20 years, and how it manifests itself today.

Download: Islamophobia: Still a challenge for us all

This anniversary report (released November 2017) brings together varied perspectives from leading thinkers on inequality and Muslims in Britain, unpacking issues such as integration, hate crime, gender, identity and, of course, racism.

The views expressed in each essay are those of the named authors and do not necessarily represent Runnymede's organisational position.

WATCH> Click here to see video testimonies on how islamophobia affects ordinary Muslims

For Runnymede's own deeper analysis and re-definition of Islamophobia as 'anti-Muslim racism', see Part 1 of the report, separately downloadable from the link below.

Islamophobia: Executive Summary
Read this 3-page summary explanation of the constituent parts of the report, which sets out Runnymede's organisational position and aims in commissioning the anniversary report.

Islamophobia Part 1: Understanding

In this introductory section Runnymede's Farah Elahi and Dr Omar Khan examine what is understood by the term 'Islamophobia' and Dr Claire Alexander of the University of Manchester looks at 'Raceing Islamophobia', expanding on the definition of it as a form of racism.

Islamophobia Part 2: Mapping
In this section various authors map the evidence of modern-day Islamophobia and look at how it manifests itself across key areas, including education, employment, housing, health, hate crime, integration, gender, globalisation and the government's counter-terrorism programme 'Prevent'. 

Islamophobia Part 3: Different Conceptions 
Here, reflections on how Islamophobia is understood in relation to concepts such as identity, language, bigotry and Anti-Semitism are explored. Also, Dr Robin Richardson, the editor of the 1997 Islamophobia report, takes a look back at what it contained and the parts that still resonate today.


https://www.runnymedetrust.org/projects-and-publications/equality-and-integration/islamophobia.html


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bullet Posted: 07 February 2018 at 3:08am
Muslim Students Fight Islamophobia in North America

The Muslim Student Association (MSA) in North America has launched an initiative to fight rising sentiments against Muslim communities in the United States and Canada.

The “United Against Islamophobia” campaign aims “to help build bridges of understanding between Muslim students and their diverse allies across college & university campuses throughout North America”, MSA said in a statement.

“We believe that standing up as inter-sectional allies for millions of young Muslim college and university students can help to address growing xenophobia and bigotry which is affecting millions of women, Latinos, African-American, LGBT and Jewish students around the world as well,” it said.

MSA National is a non-profit organization that strives to facilitate networking, educating, and empowering the students of today to be citizens   of tomorrow’s community, according to the group’s website...

http://aboutislam.net/family-society/muslims-4-humanity/muslim-students-fight-islamophobia-north-america/

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bullet Posted: 17 February 2018 at 2:36pm
Combating Islamophobia: Case from San Francisco by Dr. Hatem Bazian

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XUDIIX7-jb0

(17 minutes)


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bullet Posted: 27 March 2018 at 7:58am
Seattle Workshop Fights Islamophobia

SEATTLE – Seattle Muslims have organized a workshop to counter rising Islamophobic crimes targeting Muslim women in the US, promoting women safety and teaching them how to cooperate with police to protect themselves.

“We don’t know what our right, we don’t know what to do,” Farhiya Mohamed, executive director of the Somali Family Safety Taskforce, told q13fox on Sunday.

Mohamed is referring here to the new workshop called “Hijabs + Harassment” hosted on Sunday, March 25, in Seattle.

The idea of the workshop came to Mohamed’s mind when many women in the community started posing questions about what to do if someone yells a racial slur while they’re at a bus stop or physically attacks them because they’re wearing hijab. “So, I decided it was time to put together an educational workshop to address those concerns,” she explained.

The workshop organizers themselves have similarly experienced such Islamophobic assaults...

http://aboutislam.net/muslim-issues/america/seattle-muslims-workshop-fights-islamophobia/


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bullet Posted: 17 March 2019 at 5:19am
UK Muslims ‘Grateful’ as Local Council Adopts Islamophobia Definition

  • So far only four councils in the UK have adopted the definition recommended by the All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on British Muslims
  • “Islamophobia is real, it affects individuals and families”
  • “There is no place for hate in Islington,” said Cllr Richard Watts, Islington Council leader. 


ISLINGTON – The Chair of Finsbury Park Mosque, Mohammed Kozbar, has welcomed, on March 5, the decision of Islington Council to adopt a new definition of Islamophobia, urging the British Government to take more action on the phenomenon, Islington Now reports.

“We’re pleased to have Islington on board. Islamophobia is real, it affects individuals and families. We as a community are grateful to Islington Council as the public will learn about the issue of Islamophobia,” Kozbar expressed.

Islington Council is the fourth in Britain to adopt the Islamophobia definition recommended by the All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on British Muslims. Newham, Redbridge, and Oxford are the only other councils to have adopted the definition.

Actually, no official British definition of Islamophobia existed until the APPG on British Muslims report was published last November.

On his behalf, the leader of Islington Council, Cllr Richard Watts, said: “There’s no place for hate in Islington. We’re proud to be a welcoming, inclusive borough that celebrates diversity and champions inclusion.”

Kozbar added: “We’d like to put more pressure on the government to adopt this definition as the Muslim community and the wider community will benefit.”

In fact, Finsbury Park Mosque has been the target of repeated Islamophobic attacks of late. It was the site of a terrorist attack in 2017, when Darren Osborne drove a van into a crowd gathered outside killing one man and injuring 12 others.

In a more recent attack, a pig’s head was put on a gate at the entrance while arsonists have also targeted the mosque.

The estimates of 2009 suggested a total of about 2.4 million Muslims over all the UK. According to the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life, the number of Muslims in Britain could now be around 3 million.

Between 2001 and 2009 the Muslim population increased roughly ten times faster than the rest of society. Most Muslim immigrants to Britain came from formerly occupied nations.

The London Borough of Islington in England has an estimated population of 215,667. The entity remains the second-smallest borough in London and the third-smallest district in England.

http://aboutislam.net/muslim-issues/europe/uk-muslims-grateful-local-council-adopts-islamophobia-definition/


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bullet Posted: 17 March 2019 at 5:23am
Parliamentary Group in UK Defines Islamophobia

LONDON – The All Party Parliamentary Group on British Muslims has published a report outlining the definition of Islamophobia which has been endorsed by MPs, community activists, and inter-faith organizations, Anadolu Agency reported on November 29.

The report says:Islamophobia is rooted in racism and is a type of racism that targets expressions of Muslimness or perceived Muslimness.”

The group launched a project in April to define Islamophobia in a way acceptable to all British Muslim communities and one that could “operate across governmental, public, community and private sector organizations.”

The group members collected accounts of many Islamophobic experiences faced by Muslims.

The report highlights that there has been no attempt made by the British government to adopt a definition of Islamophobia despite its recognition of the negative impact on British Muslim communities.

“The detectable shift from overt to subtler or respectable, manifestations of Islamophobia — the normalization of the prejudice to the extent it is rendered almost invisible to many — warrants a definition that can arrest and reverse its present trajectory,” the report added.

The report also gives in-depth analysis on how Muslims living in Britain strongly identify themselves as being British, show loyalty to the UK, and believe that Islam and its way of life are compatible to British values and way of life.

In recent years there has been a significant increase in anti-Muslim hate crime in the UK with 2017 having a record number of Islamophobic attacks.

Tell Mama, a multi-faith monitoring group, recorded over 1,200 reports of Islamophobic incidents, a 26-percent surge from the previous year.

The UK last month reported a 17% increase in hate crimes over the past year, with 94,098 incidents recorded by police, up from about 40,000 reported in 2012.

On the same track, a conference organized by Stand Against Racism & Inequality (SARI), Council of Bristol Mosques, and Somali Forum to tackle Islamophobia in the media and “promote positive reporting with Muslim communities” is being held in Bristol.

Organizers have invited journalists from local TV, radio, newspapers, press offices and websites to Greenbank Mosque to meet representatives from the city’s mosques and Muslim communities.

Alex Raikes MBE, from SARI, said: “We had set up The Tackling Islamophobia Working Group (TIWG) to bring Muslim community representatives, police and other agencies together across the Avon and Somerset area.”

“We want the media to recognize the power they have to influence by ensuring positive messages and respect for Muslim communities in our city in what they broadcast or print,” Raikes demanded.

http://aboutislam.net/muslim-issues/europe/parliamentary-group-in-uk-defines-islamophobia/

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bullet Posted: 17 March 2019 at 5:26am
Iowa Groups Send Message Against Islamophobia

IOWA – As American community sees the growth of Islamophobia to epidemic proportions, religious organizations and academics in Cedar Rapids, eastern Iowa, are planning an event next month to address the problem in the city home to America’s first mosque, The Gazette reported.

“Islamophobia is a problem that exists from coast to coast, in small towns and large cities, in communities with a long-standing Muslim presence and in communities in which Muslims are fairly new,” Todd Green, associate professor of religion at Luther College and author, said.

“In this regard, it [Cedar Rapids city] is not much different from the rest of the nation in that it has not been shielded from the anti-Muslim bigotry and racism that other regions and communities have been experiencing,” he said.

“At the same time, the fact that Cedar Rapids is home to the Mother Mosque makes the city a promising venue for conversations about Islamophobia,” Green said. “From the history of Islam in Cedar Rapids, we are reminded that Islam is not a foreign religion, nor is it at odds with American values or a threat to American identity.”

Green is the guest speaker at an April 2 event in Cedar Rapids.

The event is organized by the Inter-Religious Council of Linn County along with Coe College, the Catherine McAuley Center, Temple Judah, Mount Mercy University, Cornell College, the Mother Mosque, and others.

“I recently read a novel by Louis de Bernieres, ‘Birds Without Wings,’” said Charles Crawley, president of the Inter-Religious Council of Linn County. The book, set in Turkey in the early 20th century, documents how international events tore apart Christians and Muslims who lived together peaceably for centuries.

“If we aren’t proactive, the same thing could happen here, with national and international events used to separate people on a local level,” he said. “So we want people to know there are forces actively promoting Islamophobia.”

Countering Islamophobia

Green’s two books on Islamophobia, “The Fear of Islam: An Introduction to Islamophobia in the West” and “Presumed Guilty: Why We Shouldn’t Ask Muslims to Condemn Terrorism”, propose alternative ways to engage each other in pursuit of counterterrorism.

According to Green, Islam is one facet of America’s cultural and religious landscape.

“It’s had a home in this community, right here in the Heartland of America, for generations. Muslims helped create the Cedar Rapids that we know today. That’s a powerful message in this age of Islamophobia and anti-Muslim fearmongering,” he said.

Building bridges in society can also help people of differing backgrounds to engage with each other.

“Personal relationships have the greatest potential to move the needle against prejudice, and we need to invest more energy and effort at the grassroots level in fostering an environment in which such relationships can materialize and deepen,” he said.

Green added that people must be willing to reject false connections and discriminatory rhetoric in the media.

“As we speak out against Islamophobia, and as we build relationships across religious boundaries, we must never lose sight of the larger goal — to create a movement that will dismantle the systemic discrimination faced by Muslim Americans,” Green said.

Rising Hate

American Muslims see rising Islamophobia as a major obstacle to their daily life.

The Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR), a leading Muslim civil rights and advocacy group, said that anti-Muslim discrimination incidents and hate crimes increased in the third quarter of 2018 by 83 and 21 percent respectively, compared with the first quarter.

During 2018, CAIR documented more than 1,000 reports of potential bias incidents. The numbers include situations involving various government agencies.

http://aboutislam.net/muslim-issues/america/iowa-groups-send-message-against-islamophobia/


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bullet Posted: 17 March 2019 at 5:38am
Islamophobia is not confined to online groups. It leaks across public life

This ugly form of racism shapes the way Muslims are perceived and treated

n Friday morning, as the news from Christchurch was still rolling across radio bulletins, Sir Mark Rowley, the former head of counter-terrorism at the Met, was commenting on the horror on BBC Radio 4’s Today programme. Fifty Muslims had been brutally murdered, and 48 seriously injured. For 17 horrifying minutes, a white supremacist terrorist unloaded round after round of bullets into men, women and children.

Islamophobia was undoubtedly real and on the rise and being propagated online, said Rowley. But, he went on to quibble, Islamophobia wasn’t racism. To conflate the two was, he claimed, “clumsy thinking”.

The remark was treated as a random aside, made off the cuff, and left entirely unchallenged. Why? Because, it would seem, even on a morning when we’re reeling, devastated and trying to process terrorist violence in mosques, it is fair game to diminish the lived reality of Muslims. Which isn’t me being dramatic; it is simply a fact.

Islamophobia is racism: it’s not a coincidence that the majority of Muslims are not white and have roots in formerly colonised countries. It’s not an exaggeration to say that racist stereotypes abound to the point where you don’t even have to be a Muslim to be attacked as one (just ask a Sikh navigating the world post-9/11).

Islamophobia does not simply exist on the unpalatable mass of the internet. It’s not the preserve of rightwing extremists whom we write off as online nutters. It leaks across public life, in our institutions and our media, to form a pernicious feedback loop and almost nobody cares. If in doubt, consider the lonely figure cut by Sayeeda Warsi, whose calls for an inquiry into the documented Islamophobia within the Conservative party are blithely ignored by government.

Remember a referendum campaign won on lies, fear-mongering about mass immigration from refugees, from Turkey, from anyone with “a funny tinge”. Bear in mind the dogged work of Miqdaad Versi, of the Muslim Council of Britain, politely lodging complaints against thousands of Islamophobic stories in the press, often upheld by the Independent Press Standards Organisation, and barely anyone batting an eyelid. Given the hysterical state of national debate, it is either disingenuous or profoundly stupid to claim that the daily drip-feed of Islamophobia, which is now so normalised in Britain as to be hardly remarkable, doesn’t significantly shape the way Muslims are perceived and treated.

Words matter. So do images. It’s not for nothing that the atrocity in Christchurch was preceded by a 74-page manifesto published online and then streamed on Facebook Live. If a white supremacist can understand this power, it’s not beyond the editor who chose to publish a picture of him as a toddler on its front page, rather than using that space to humanise his victims.

It certainly can’t escape the commentators who have made their bread and butter demonising and dehumanising Muslims and are expressing shock and grief at how their bile manifests in the real world.

Both the Daily Mail and the Mirror chose to gorge on the terrorist’s brutality, and broadcast his footage to their audience until they were shamed into removing it. This callous lack of humanity simply would never occur were the victims not Muslim and their lives already so othered, so seemingly disposable and without value.How did this angelic little boy grow up to be a mass killer, asks the Mirror. What did his grandmother think of her “good boy” grandson, probes the Daily Mail. Frankly, I don’t care. I don’t want to glorify his name. I’m not yet ready for Newsnight choosing to choose to give a platform to a white fascist to discuss the massacre, under the hollow pursuit of free speech.

It’s an exhausted cliche to point out the hypocritical differences in the way the Christchurch terrorist is being covered by our press and what we learned about, say, the killers of the British soldier Lee Rigby. Or the 7/7 bombers.

While it is, of course, a legitimate journalistic endeavour to understand how and why the gunman did what he did, humanising a mass murderer desperate for notoriety should not be the main focus of our attention. If he weren’t an angry white man, it wouldn’t be. It’s not too much to ask that care and empathy be focused on the victims. Their families. Their lives.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/mar/16/islamophobia-not-preserve-extremists-leaks-across-public-life


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bullet Posted: 22 March 2019 at 4:20am
Combating Islamophobia with Marketing and Design

With the rise of Islamophobia on one side, and extremism on the other, Islam has been cast as irrational, incompatible with modern civilization, and inherently violent.

This has put Muslims in a defensive position in which they constantly have to justify their convictions, while fighting off the natural doubts and insecurities that arise from such a climate.

Yaqeen Institute has built a content marketing engine to address these relevant topics head-on. Using articles, infographics, podcasts, videos, web and mobile applications, and a robust social media presence, Yaqeen Institute has been able to proliferate content that dispels myths and misconceptions associated with Islam and Muslims while simultaneously equipping Muslims with the education to participate in the public discourse.


(37 minutes)


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