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Earth Hour

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Topic: Earth Hour
Posted By: a well wisher
Subject: Earth Hour
Date Posted: 23 March 2013 at 7:27am
Saturday, March 23 at 8:30 p.m. your local time
 
 
 
http://www.earthhour.org/ - http://www.earthhour.org/
 
 
 
http://worldwildlife.org/pages/earth-hour - http://worldwildlife.org/pages/earth-hour
 
 


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah



Replies:
Posted By: Damo808
Date Posted: 28 March 2013 at 7:59am
Originally posted by a well wisher

Saturday, March 23 at 8:30 p.m. your local time
 
 
 
http://www.earthhour.org/ -  
http://worldwildlife.org/pages/earth-hour -  
 


 I'm not buying


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out of thee shall he come forth unto me that is to be the ruler in Israel: and his going forth is from the beginning, from the days of eternity. Micah 5:5


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 01 May 2013 at 7:36pm
Originally posted by Damo808

 
 I'm not buying
 
 
Sorry I missed this post brother Damo.
 
Why is that?Human Achievement Hour?
 
 
 


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: Damo808
Date Posted: 22 May 2013 at 7:15am
 
Sorry I missed this post brother Damo.
 
Why is that?Human Achievement Hour?

-Well wisher


Why what ? My reservations about Earth Hour ?

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out of thee shall he come forth unto me that is to be the ruler in Israel: and his going forth is from the beginning, from the days of eternity. Micah 5:5


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 23 May 2013 at 3:05pm
Originally posted by Damo808

 


Why what ? My reservations about Earth Hour ?
 
Yes brother Damo
 
Sorry for not being clear.


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: Damo808
Date Posted: 24 May 2013 at 9:10am
Well wisher..

See for yourself.... No not some wack-job conspiracy theory either.


 Remember also  how the Univeristy of East Anglia UK got caught red handed back in mid 09  cooking the books so to speak...

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/comment/columnists/christopherbooker/6679082/Climate-change-this-is-the-worst-scientific-scandal-of-our-
generation.html

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1246661/New-scandal-Climate-Gate-scientists-accused-hiding-data-global-warming-sceptics.html

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/georgemonbiot/2010/feb/02/climate-change-hacked-emails

The following controversial documentary was aired on mainstream UK TV Ch4
 years before the above articals broke .
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YtevF4B4RtQ


 Motive ???



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out of thee shall he come forth unto me that is to be the ruler in Israel: and his going forth is from the beginning, from the days of eternity. Micah 5:5


Posted By: botak
Date Posted: 24 May 2013 at 3:24pm
Do people still believe that climate change isn't happening? I mean, stuff the scientific debate, just look at the objective, directly observable climate changes that have happened over the past 20 years. I don't need data, I just need my eyes.

Climate change is happening, no doubt, the question is natural or man-made?

Ultimately, it shouldn't matter to the way we respond. Even if there is a 10% probability of climate change being man made, that is enough for us to have to react.

Climate change is never discussed in the correct way, you do not have to prove climate change is man made before you react, you have to prove a possibility that climate change is man made. The debate shouldn't be 'is climate change man made' it should be 'what is the probability that climate change is man made?'

You buy home insurance, health insurance and car insurance, not because you think you will use it, but because you can't afford to take the chance that you won't need to use it.

No one can say 100% climate change isn't man made, so we need to take precautions until it can be proved either way, because if we are wrong the cost will be greater than we can imagine (and will be passed on to our kids, grandkids, etc.)

In my opinion, it's probably like the tobacco debate in the 70s, lots of PR money from vested interests is being used to 'discredit' the scientific consensus. Probably, in future times, we will see it like the tobacco causes cancer debate and find it amazing that people managed to muddy the debate for so long.

But ultimately, it doesn't matter that the scientific debate is 'inconclusive', it doesn't even matter if the vast scientific consensus is wrong. You don't need a 100% probability before you act you need a 5% probability before it starts to be in your best interests to act. You weren't wrong to buy health insurance even if you don't get cancer after all.


Posted By: The_Rock
Date Posted: 24 May 2013 at 11:00pm
yes, but what reaction is appropriate , botak?

I like this idea - e-cat rossi.


Posted By: Damo808
Date Posted: 25 May 2013 at 7:38am
Originally posted by The_Rock

yes, but what reaction is appropriate , botak?

I like this idea - e-cat rossi.



 Introduce global taxes on carbon footprints on farmers and industry... which btw goes nowhere towards combating the phenomenon but does go someway towards  devastating emerging markets and economies.
 
 


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out of thee shall he come forth unto me that is to be the ruler in Israel: and his going forth is from the beginning, from the days of eternity. Micah 5:5


Posted By: Damo808
Date Posted: 25 May 2013 at 12:36pm
Don't misunderstand me... i'm all for cleaner ways of doing things, i'd love to one day have a practical and eco friendly alternative to oil...
Thats practical..

But when it comes to me having to pay the difference of about £100 + every year extra on my road tax as a penalization  for having an engine larger than a 1100 cc or aircraft duty for a flight etc etc etc.. forgive my skepticism.


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out of thee shall he come forth unto me that is to be the ruler in Israel: and his going forth is from the beginning, from the days of eternity. Micah 5:5


Posted By: botak
Date Posted: 26 May 2013 at 3:34pm
Originally posted by Damo808


Originally posted by The_Rock

yes, but what reaction is appropriate , botak?

I like this idea - e-cat rossi.
 Introduce global taxes on carbon footprints on farmers and industry... which btw goes nowhere towards combating the phenomenon but does go someway towards  devastating emerging markets and economies.    


The effects of global warming will have a far worse effect on the developing world than carbon taxes.

No idea what the solution is though, population growth needs to be checked which won't happen, big business still calls the shots in the developed world, corruption is endemic in the developing world, economic competition stops people from taking the initiative, can't say I'm optimistic,,,


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 26 May 2013 at 4:24pm
Originally posted by Damo808

Well wisher..

See for yourself.... No not some wack-job conspiracy theory either.


 Remember also  how the Univeristy of East Anglia UK got caught red handed back in mid 09  cooking the books so to speak...

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/comment/columnists/christopherbooker/6679082/Climate-change-this-is-the-worst-scientific-scandal-of-our-
generation.html

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1246661/New-scandal-Climate-Gate-scientists-accused-hiding-data-global-warming-sceptics.html

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/georgemonbiot/2010/feb/02/climate-change-hacked-emails

The following controversial documentary was aired on mainstream UK TV Ch4
 years before the above articals broke .
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YtevF4B4RtQ


 Motive ???

 
Politics:)
 
Climate change is a complex phenomenon brother Damo but as individuals we can do our part no matter what the motives for others may be.As Wendell Berry puts it ....Cultivate your corner of the world. You grow your garden; your garden grows you.
 
 
I haven't seen the Ch4 documentary.Will do Insha Allah.I have heard about the controversy though... it is just one thing among many...
 
For example if you would take a look at these links....
 
 
 
The goal of Skeptical Science is to explain what peer reviewed science has to say about global warming. When you peruse the http://www.skepticalscience.com/argument.php?f=taxonomy - many arguments of global warming skeptics , a pattern emerges. Skeptic arguments tend to focus on narrow pieces of the puzzle while neglecting the broader picture. For example, focus on http://www.skepticalscience.com/Climategate-CRU-emails-hacked.htm - Climategate emails neglects the full weight of http://www.skepticalscience.com/empirical-evidence-for-global-warming.htm - scientific evidence for man-made global warming . Concentrating on a few growing glaciers ignores the http://www.skepticalscience.com/himalayan-glaciers-growing.htm - world wide trend of accelerating glacier shrinkage . Claims of global cooling fail to realise the http://www.skepticalscience.com/global-cooling.htm - planet as a whole is still accumulating heat . This website presents the broader picture by explaining the peer reviewed scientific literature.

Often, the reason for disbelieving in man-made global warming seem to be political rather than scientific. Eg - "it's all a liberal plot to spread socialism and destroy capitalism". As one person put it, "the cheerleaders for doing something about global warming seem to be largely the cheerleaders for many causes of which I disapprove". However, what is causing global warming is a purely scientific question. Skeptical Science removes the politics from the debate by concentrating solely on the science.

http://www.skepticalscience.com/about.shtml - http://www.skepticalscience.com/about.shtml
 
 
Climate Change Fake? World Has Never Been Hotter
 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZsIojRvAY6A - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZsIojRvAY6A
 
(About 8 mins)
 
 
 
 
 


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 26 May 2013 at 4:26pm
Originally posted by botak

Do people still believe that climate change isn't happening? I mean, stuff the scientific debate, just look at the objective, directly observable climate changes that have happened over the past 20 years.
 
I don't need data, I just need my eyes. 


 
 
Ditto


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 26 May 2013 at 4:32pm
Originally posted by botak


Climate change is never discussed in the correct way, you do not have to prove climate change is man made before you react, you have to prove a possibility that climate change is man made. The debate shouldn't be 'is climate change man made' it should be 'what is the probability that climate change is man made?'


But ultimately, it doesn't matter that the scientific debate is 'inconclusive', it doesn't even matter if the vast scientific consensus is wrong.
 

Communicating uncertainty in climate science

When the media talk about cli­mate change scep­ti­cism, they usu­ally mean that people are uncer­tain in some way about the reality or ser­i­ous­ness of cli­mate change.

A number of polls of public atti­tudes towards cli­mate change have doc­u­mented an increase in the degree of per­ceived uncer­tainty about cli­mate change over the past three years (BBC, 2010; Pew Research Centre, 2009; Spence, Venables, Pidgeon, Poortinga & Demski, 2010). These data on public opinion about cli­mate change can be con­trasted with a recent survey of active and pub­lishing cli­mate sci­ent­ists. Among this group, Doran and Zimmerman (2009) found 97% agree that human activity is con­trib­uting to cli­mate change. On the basic ques­tion of whether human activity is influ­en­cing the global cli­mate there is very little uncer­tainty among cli­mate scientists.

But des­pite the over­whelming amount of sci­entific evid­ence that shows human activ­ities are causing the earth to warm, debates about cli­mate change are still char­ac­ter­ised by an enormous amount of uncer­tainty (Zehr, 2000). The everyday meaning of uncer­tainty is neg­ative – and so when it comes to cli­mate change, people tend to infer that sci­ent­ists do not know any­thing about a topic, just because they do not know everything about it. Uncertainty about cli­mate change is a major bar­rier to public engagement.

The British Royal Society has pro­duced a http://royalsociety.org/climate-change-summary-of-science/ - guide to the sci­ence of cli­mate change that describes the areas where the sci­ence is well estab­lished, where there is still some debate, and where genuine uncer­tain­ties remain. Although it is clearly written, it is aimed at people who have some under­standing of the sci­ence. But the basic mes­sage is very clear: there is strong and reli­able evid­ence that human activity has caused the earth to warm over the past 50 years – on this crit­ical point, there is next to no uncer­tainty. Emphasising that uncer­tainty in sci­ence is normal will help to combat the belief that uncer­tainty should equal inaction.

As a com­mu­nic­ator, it is crit­ical to explain to people the dif­fer­ence between sci­entific uncer­tainty (that is, the extent to which sci­ent­ists agree about the answer to a par­tic­ular ques­tion), and uncer­tainty that comes from deciding how to respond to what the cli­mate sci­ence tells us. In his book, Why we dis­agree about cli­mate change, the cli­mate sci­entist Mike Hulme shows how easy it is to con­fuse the dif­ferent types of uncer­tainty that sur­round cli­mate change (Hulme, 2009).

No matter how much sci­ence is con­ducted, it will never tell us which of a set of dif­ferent policies to choose. A sci­entist can tell you how much carbon is in the atmo­sphere, and cal­cu­late the effect­ive­ness of dif­ferent methods of redu­cing it (e.g. redu­cing the number of cars on the road vs. reg­u­lating emis­sions from cement factories). But a sci­entist cannot tell you which of these is the right choice to make – this is a decision for cit­izens and politi­cians. Being as clear as pos­sible about the dif­fer­ence between cli­mate sci­ence, and the choices we make based on that sci­ence, is essen­tial for effective com­mu­nic­a­tion – oth­er­wise, these dif­ferent types of uncer­tainty become confused.

http://talkingclimate.org/guides/a-guide-to-communicating-uncertainty-in-climate-science/ - http://talkingclimate.org/guides/a-guide-to-communicating-uncertainty-in-climate-science/


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 26 May 2013 at 4:37pm
A single return flight between New York and London produces 1.2 tons of greenhouse gases per passenger, the equivalent of a year’s allowable emissions if emissions were rationed fairly” among all 7 billion people on this planet.
 
 
Doctors, dentists, lawyers, engineers etc all have to take stringent examinations because lives depend on their knowledge.
 
Why not politicians too? They are responsible for many more lives.


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 26 May 2013 at 4:49pm
Originally posted by botak



The effects of global warming will have a far worse effect on the developing world than carbon taxes.

No idea what the solution is though, population growth needs to be checked which won't happen, big business still calls the shots in the developed world, corruption is endemic in the developing world, economic competition stops people from taking the initiative, can't say I'm optimistic,,,
 
Please have hope.
 
Have you heard of Dr.Hans Rosling...The Gapminder project?
 
Population growth and climate change explained by Hans Rosling
 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SxbprYyjyyU - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SxbprYyjyyU
 
(About 3 mins)
 

“Demand carbon dioxide data” says Hans Rosling to open data advocates at OKFestival

In classic Rosling style he started out debunking myths surrounding international development trends – including a special demonstration using toilet rolls to illustrate population growth.
 
While OECD and other international institutions hold CO2 data, much of this is not public or behind a paywall. “Let’s go there and liberate it!” he said, suggesting that we need a “data driven discussion of energy and resources”. While there have been numerous CO2 related applications and services about individual behaviour and lifestyle choices, he appealed to app developers: “Don’t do only small apps, do apps for the world”.
 
http://blog.okfn.org/2012/09/21/demand-carbon-dioxide-data-says-hans-rosling-to-open-data-advocates-at-okfestival/ - http://blog.okfn.org/2012/09/21/demand-carbon-dioxide-data-says-hans-rosling-to-open-data-advocates-at-okfestival/
 
 


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 27 May 2013 at 3:51pm

EDxChange - Dr.Hans Rosling - Child Mortailty, Family Planning & the Environment

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xt4KaB_gWDc - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xt4KaB_gWDc

(About 5 mins)



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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 27 May 2013 at 4:02pm

That’s one of Wendell’s recurring themes: Listen to the land.

There really is not that much to see until I try to see it through Wendell’s eyes, and then every bit of erosion becomes a tiny tragedy — or at least a human’s mistake — and every bit of forest floor becomes a bit of the genius of nature. (If you imitate nature, he’s said, you’ll use the land wisely.)

He knows the land the way I know the stops on the Lexington Avenue subway line and, predictably, I begin feeling like the fairly techie city person I am and wonder if it could have been otherwise. Wendell has, a sense of patience and understanding, a kind of calm despite full awareness of the storm. In Washington this past Monday, http://www.neh.gov/about/awards/jefferson-lecture/wendell-e-berry-lecture - Wendell delivered the 2012 Jefferson Lecture , the highest honor the federal government has for “distinguished intellectual achievement” in the humanities. He titled the talk “It All Turns on Affection.”

Monday, he spoke of the “mechanical indifference” of a financial trust, that it had the “indifference of a grinder to what it grinds,” saying, “It did not intend to victimize its victims. It simply followed its single purpose of the highest possible profit, and ignored the ‘side effects.’” This from a poet and an essayist who, by following his love of the land and its people, describes the current state of affairs as accurately and succinctly as anyone on earth: “The two great aims of industrialism — replacement of people by technology and concentration of wealth into the hands of a small plutocracy — seem close to fulfillment.”

I knew that Wendell and I agreed on these things when I went to visit him. Oddly, I felt, as I imagine others have in making the same trip, as if I were seeking wisdom. We spoke, as I said, for hours, and my two big questions for him were, essentially, “How are we going to change this?” and “What can city people do?”

He makes it clear that he doesn’t think anything is going to happen quickly, except perhaps the possible catastrophe that lurks in the minds of everyone who believes the earth to be overstressed. “You can describe the predicament that we’re in as an emergency,” he says, “and your trial is to learn to be patient in an emergency.”

Change, he says, is going to come from “people at the bottom” doing things differently. “[N]o great feat is going to happen to change all this; you’re going to have to humble yourself to be willing to do it one little bit at a time. You can’t make people do this. What you have to do is notice that they’re already doing it.”

Then he takes me to the barn, where there are seven newborn lambs. And he says, “When you are new at sheep-raising and your ewe has a lamb, your impulse is to stay there and help it nurse and see to it and all. After a while you know that the best thing you can do is walk out of the barn.”

We walk out of the barn, and say goodbye.

Three hours later, my phone rings. ( http://home.btconnect.com/tipiglen/berrynot.html - Wendell, famously, does not own a computer .) “Mark,” he says. “I’ve been thinking about that question about what city people can do. The main thing is to realize that country people can’t invent a better agriculture by ourselves. Industrial agriculture wasn’t invented by us, and we can’t uninvent it. We’ll need some help with that.”

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/04/24/wendell-berry-american-hero/ - http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/04/24/wendell-berry-american-hero/


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 27 May 2013 at 4:04pm

Allan Savory: How to green the world's deserts and reverse climate change

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vpTHi7O66pI - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vpTHi7O66pI

(About 22 mins)



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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 28 May 2013 at 6:21pm
"What is the measure of progress? It is possible to measure the progress of the last two or three hundred years in soil erosion. We can measure it in the rate of species extinction. We can measure it in pollution, in the toxicity of the world. Those things, like power and speed, are perfectly measurable. But we need also to raise the questions that are not quantitative.
 
How happy are people? What do we make of all this complaining? How healthy are people? How are love and beauty faring? What do we make of all this doctoring and medication that is going on all the time at such a great expense?"
 
 
~Wendell Berry


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 02 June 2013 at 4:59pm

In his 1961 study, “Disasters and Mental Health: Therapeutic Principles Drawn from Disaster Studies,” sociologist Charles Fritz asks an interesting question: “Why do large-scale disasters produce such mentally healthy conditions?” One of the answers is that a disaster shakes us loose of ordinary time. “In everyday life many human problems stem from people's preoccupation with the past and the future, rather than the present,” Fritz wrote. “Disasters provide a temporary liberation from the worries, inhibitions, and anxieties associated with the past and the future because they force people to concentrate their full attention on immediate moment-to-moment, day-to-day needs.” This shift in awareness, he added, “speeds the process of decision-making” and “facilitates the acceptance of change.” 

The state of mind Fritz describes resembles those sought in various spiritual traditions. It recalls Buddhism's emphasis on being in the moment, nonattachment, and compassion for all beings, and the Christian monastic tradition's emphasis on awareness of mortality and ephemerality. From this perspective, disaster can be understood as a crash course in consciousness.

. . . . The aftermath of disaster is often peculiarly hopeful, and in the rupture of the ordinary, real change often emerges. But this means that disaster threatens not only bodies, buildings, and property but also the status quo.

Disaster recovery is not just a rescue of the needy but also a scramble for power and legitimacy, one that the status quo usually-but not always-wins.

~Rebecca Solnit



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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 20 June 2013 at 8:49am

Sustainable development in an unequal world

Sharing the effort

Global governance has entered into a new and challenging era. Every country needs to contribute, to save both its own future and our common, global future. But the report has not helped me to imagine how countries will share this effort equitably.

“I believe we urgently need answers if we are going to see bold actions and build trust.”

What does justice mean for poorer populations and the young generation? What if a country has a substantial number of people struggling for a living while a few others become extremely wealthy? When it comes to emission mitigation and financial compensation, how bold are the big polluters prepared to be to make a fair deal for the other countries? Is it fair if technologically advanced countries urge others to take actions that would leave them unable to afford those same technologies?

I believe we urgently need answers if we are going to see bold actions and build trust. The report doesn’t try to provide all these answers. But I hope to see more creative and practical ideas, as well as political will at the highest levels, to envisage a sustainable world built on equitable, shared efforts.

http://theelders.org/article/sustainable-development-unequal-world - http://theelders.org/article/sustainable-development-unequal-world


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 29 March 2014 at 8:43am

Wendell Berry Reads A Poem on Hope

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2j_r4jb9AYw - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2j_r4jb9AYw

(About 6 mins)



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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 03 April 2014 at 3:07pm
How Art Can Bear Witness to Climate Change

Beautiful Sunsets (and Sunrises) in Art

On March 25, the Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics journal http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/14/2987/2014/acp-14-2987-2014.pdf - published an article that addresses pollution in art. Soon I’ll talk about that, but first a bit about the Arctic.

There is a kind of Arctic pollution that a photo helped me to understand. Upon seeing one of my photographs people have asked, “Are these colors real or manipulated?” The photograph in question is of a group of musk oxen on the Canning River Delta that I had taken in early May 2001, in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (see http://www.arcticrefugeart.org/banerjee/ban_100_muskox.html - here ). The temperature was about minus 35 degrees Fahrenheit; deep haze severely restricted visibility, as I lay flat on my belly with the lens touching snow to make the animals visible, barely. Indeed, I began to wonder how could there be such vibrant colors in an environment that is supposed to be free of pollution? I remember from my childhood many colorful sunrises and sunsets in Kolkata, where pollution in the air was all around us; it still is. There had to be particulates in the air to create those deep red-orange colors in the musk oxen photo, and I surmised that the source of the pollution was perhaps the nearby oil fields of Prudhoe Bay, but on probing further I also came to know about the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arctic_haze - Arctic haze that a handful of scientists have been studying. I don’t know if what you see in the photo is indeed Arctic haze or pollution from Prudhoe Bay, but, nevertheless, a http://www.safewater.org/PDFS/resourcesknowthefacts/Arctic_Haze_Fact_Sheet_07.pdf - fact sheet states :

“Arctic haze is a thin, persistent, brown haze that causes limited visibility on the horizons of what had been previously very clear Arctic skies. It is most visible in the early spring and can be seen from northern Greenland, the Arctic coasts of Canada and Alaska and occasionally in eastern Siberia. … The Arctic haze that accumulates by late winter, trapped under the dome of cold air, is as large as the continent of Africa! … Arctic haze is made up of a complex mix of microscopic particles and acidifying pollutants such as soot, hydrocarbons, and sulfates. Up to 90% of Arctic haze consists of sulfates. … We can find out where Arctic haze comes from because the chemicals that make up Arctic haze are like a footprint that can lead us back to their sources. The main sources of the sulfates found in Arctic haze are things like power plants, pulp and paper mills, and oil and gas activities. The other pollutants found in Arctic haze can be traced to industries such as vehicles, shipping and agriculture. The places in which these industries occur and where these pollutants thus originate are in the heavily populated and industrialized areas of Europe, North America and Asia.”

The question is: What is the long-term stress acidification from Arctic haze might put on the fragile Arctic ecology? While we don’t know this yet, the haze might also be contributing to the http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/04/080407132120.htm - rapid polar melt :

The UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change  http://ipcc-wg2.gov/AR5/images/uploads/IPCC_WG2AR5_SPM_Approved.pdf - has just released  the “Climate Change 2014: Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability | Summary for Policy Makers” report.

I don’t want to overstate the significance of art in addressing the Himalaya of environmental injuries that surround us today. I do want to point out, however, that while scientists have been telling us about earth’s climate in the http://www.amazon.com/Paleoclimate-Princeton-Primers-Climate-Michael/dp/0691145555/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1396222133&sr=1-1&keywords=paleoclimate - deep past , and into the http://www.amazon.com/Long-Thaw-Changing-Climate-Essentials/dp/0691148112/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1396222176&sr=1-1&keywords=the+long+thaw - distant future , artists on the other hand, have been bearing witness, in the present. They always have.

http://www.counterpunch.org/2014/04/01/beautiful-sunsets-and-sunrises-in-art/ - http://www.counterpunch.org/2014/04/01/beautiful-sunsets-and-sunrises-in-art/


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 22 April 2014 at 5:31pm
It All Turns on Affection

I will say, from my own belief and experience, that imagination thrives on contact, on tangible connection. For humans to have a responsible relationship to the world, they must imagine their places in it. To have a place, to live and belong in a place, to live from a place without destroying it, we must imagine it. By imagination we see it illuminated by its own unique character and by our love for it. By imagination we recognize with sympathy the fellow members, human and nonhuman, with whom we share our place. By that local experience we see the need to grant a sort of preemptive sympathy to all the fellow members, the neighbors, with whom we share the world. As imagination enables sympathy, sympathy enables affection. And it is in affection that we find the possibility of a neighborly, kind, and conserving economy.

Obviously there is some risk in making affection the pivot of an argument about economy. The charge will be made that affection is an emotion, merely “subjective,” and therefore that all affections are more or less equal: people may have affection for their children and their automobiles, their neighbors and their weapons. But the risk, I think, is only that affection is personal. If it is not personal, it is nothing; we don’t, at least, have to worry about governmental or corporate affection. And one of the endeavors of human cultures, from the beginning, has been to qualify and direct the influence of emotion. The word “affection” and the terms of value that cluster around it—love, care, sympathy, mercy, forbearance, respect, reverence—have histories and meanings that raise the issue of worth. We should, as our culture has warned us over and over again, give our affection to things that are true, just, and beautiful. When we give affection to things that are destructive, we are wrong. A large machine in a large, toxic, eroded cornfield is not, properly speaking, an object or a sign of affection.

Wendell Berry




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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 23 April 2014 at 4:14pm


It All Turns on Affection

The problem that ought to concern us first is the fairly recent dismantling of our old understanding and acceptance of human limits. For a long time we knew that we were not, and could never be, “as gods.” We knew, or retained the capacity to learn, that our intelligence could get us into trouble that it could not get us out of. We were intelligent enough to know that our intelligence, like our world, is limited. We seem to have known and feared the possibility of irreparable damage. But beginning in science and engineering, and continuing, by imitation, into other disciplines, we have progressed to the belief that humans are intelligent enough, or soon will be, to transcend all limits and to forestall or correct all bad results of the misuse of intelligence. Upon this belief rests the further belief that we can have “economic growth” without limit.


Economy in its original—and, I think, its proper—sense refers to household management. By extension, it refers to the husbanding of all the goods by which we live. An authentic economy, if we had one, would define and make, on the terms of thrift and affection, our connections to nature and to one another. Our present industrial system also makes those connections, but by pillage and indifference. Most economists think of this arrangement as “the economy.” Their columns and articles rarely if ever mention the land-communities and land-use economies. They never ask, in their professional oblivion, why we are willing to do permanent ecological and cultural damage “to strengthen the economy?”


The problem of sustainability is simple enough to state. It requires that the fertility cycle of birth, growth, maturity, death, and decay—what Albert Howard called “the Wheel of Life”—should turn continuously in place, so that the law of return is kept and nothing is wasted. For this to happen in the stewardship of humans, there must be a cultural cycle, in harmony with the fertility cycle, also continuously turning in place. The cultural cycle is an unending conversation between old people and young people, assuring the survival of local memory, which has, as long as it remains local, the greatest practical urgency and value. This is what is meant, and is all that is meant, by “sustainability.” The fertility cycle turns by the law of nature. The cultural cycle turns on affection.


That we live now in an economy that is not sustainable is not the fault only of a few mongers of power and heavy equipment. We all are implicated. We all, in the course of our daily economic life, consent to it, whether or not we approve of it. This is because of the increasing abstraction and unconsciousness of our connection to our economic sources in the land, the land-communities, and the land-use economies. In my region and within my memory, for example, human life has become less creaturely and more engineered, less familiar and more remote from local places, pleasures, and associations. Our knowledge, in short, has become increasingly statistical.


This is the sort of knowledge we now call “data” or “facts” or “information.” Or we call it “objective knowledge,” supposedly untainted by personal attachment, but nonetheless available for industrial and commercial exploitation. By means of such knowledge a category assumes dominion over its parts or members. With the coming of industrialism, the great industrialists, like kings and conquerors, become exploiters of statistical knowledge. And finally virtually all of us, in order to participate and survive in their system, have had to agree to their substitution of statistical knowledge for personal knowledge.


The argument of Howards End has its beginning in a manifesto against materialism:

It is the vice of a vulgar mind to be thrilled by bigness, to think that a thousand square miles are a thousand times more wonderful than one square mile . . . That is not imagination. No, it kills it. . . . Your universities? Oh, yes, you have learned men who collect . . . facts, and facts, and empires of facts. But which of them will rekindle the light within?


“The light within,” I think, means affection, affection as motive and guide. Knowledge without affection leads us astray every time. Affection leads, by way of good work, to authentic hope. The factual knowledge, in which we seem more and more to be placing our trust, leads only to hope of the discovery, endlessly deferrable, of an ultimate fact or smallest particle that at last will explain everything.

The climactic scene of Forster’s novel is the confrontation between its heroine, Margaret Schlegel, and her husband, the self-described “plain man of business,” Henry Wilcox. The issue is Henry’s determination to deal, as he thinks, “realistically” with a situation that calls for imagination, for affection, and then forgiveness. Margaret feels at the start of their confrontation that she is “fighting for women against men.” But she is not a feminist in the popular or political sense. What she opposes with all her might is Henry’s hardness of mind and heart that is “realistic” only because it is expedient and because it subtracts from reality the life of imagination and affection, of living souls. She opposes his refusal to see the practicality of the life of the soul.


Margaret’s premise, as she puts it to Henry, is the balance point of the book:  “It all turns on affection now . . . Affection. Don’t you see?”

In a speech delivered in 2006, “Revitalizing Rural Communities,” Frederick Kirschenmann quoted his friend Constance Falk, an economist: “There is a new vision emerging demonstrating how we can solve problems and at the same time create a better world, and it all depends on collaboration, love, respect, beauty, and fairness.”

Those two women, almost a century apart, speak for human wholeness against fragmentation, disorder, and heartbreak. The English philosopher and geometer, Keith Critchlow, brings his own light to the same point: “The human mind takes apart with its analytic habits of reasoning but the human heart puts things together because it loves them . . .”


http://www.neh.gov/about/awards/jefferson-lecture/wendell-e-berry-lecture - http://www.neh.gov/about/awards/jefferson-lecture/wendell-e-berry-lecture




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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 31 August 2014 at 3:34pm

Suicidal vs. Life-Giving Religious Narratives

Religious communities, among the many contributions they make, infuse narratives into communities. I call them framing-stories.

Three Suicidal Religious Framing-Stories

One of them is the us-versus-them narrative that builds on the idea that to have a strong identity, we have to be against people of other identities.

The second narrative is based on the idea of "us versus nature."

The third narrative, which is especially deeply rooted in our monotheistic faiths, is the "God-versus-us" narrative that sees God as our enemy and religion as saving us from God.

The Opposite, Life-Giving Spiritual Framing Stories

A spiritual alternative is the narrative of God for creation, God with creation, God in creation.

All of you who love Islam know that at its highest, Islam presents itself as a way of life: a way of ordering life toward peace and harmony with our fellow creatures.

So all of our religious traditions have at their deepest root this narrative of God for creation, God with creation, God in creation. That is something that we who call ourselves spiritual have to celebrate and elevate as a saving alternative to the suicidal narrative that's all too common among us.

Second, as an antidote and remedy to the us-versus-nature narrative, we have to discover the narrative of us for creation, us with creation, and us in creation. And of course, that's the narrative in the first chapters of Genesis: human beings caring for the garden and human beings having responsibility for the garden.

Finally, we can transcend the us-versus-them narrative, which makes having a strong religious identity synonymous with having a counter-dependent religious identity with other religions. We can transcend it with another narrative expressed in a couple of different ways. One is to say, "There is no them." In the Hebrew scriptures, at the center of our three monotheistic faiths, there's not one God who creates some people over here and another God that creates other people over there, leaving us inherently irreconcilable. Instead, the story of Adam is the story of our shared common humanity, our common source. Even the idea of God as judge is a grossly misunderstood concept in most Western Christian theology because we lost the Jewish ancient understanding that a judge isn't the one who comes to condemn you, a judge is the one who comes to bring you justice. When you're an oppressed person, the bringing of justice is really, really good news. So this idea of God as the universal judge says God has every other human being's well-being in mind. God is interested in the interests of the other, not just our interests. And that realization changes the narrative: you cannot have an us-versus-them narrative.

http://www.tikkun.org/nextgen/suicidal-vs-life-giving-religious-narratives - http://www.tikkun.org/nextgen/suicidal-vs-life-giving-religious-narratives



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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 08 September 2014 at 2:30pm

Living with Just Enough

By now we are all extremely familiar with the litany of challenges we face as a global species, the threats of scarcity which pit state against state and community against community, problems manmade and visible in nature: growing population, increasing urbanization, deforestation, damaged watersheds, over-consumption of resources, energy shortages, waste, pollution....All of us could easily add to this list. We know there will be no easy fixes, no panaceas, but nevertheless as we try to set priorities and search for the most promising ways to approach these problems, many of us find ourselves looking to different cultures and to earlier eras for inspiration. In this regard, the Edo period of Japan has a lot to teach us. We could in fact use it as a model of how to flip impending environmental collapse into sustainability, primarily by allowing a rich and insightful mindset rooted in centuries of experience and wisdom to guide our decisions.

The Edo Period began in 1603, at the close of 200 years of civil war, and lasted two and a half centuries, coming to an end in 1868 as the country opened to the world and was first exposed to the fruits of the industrial revolution. Most of what we think of as "traditional" Japanese design comes from this era, when shoguns ruled and society was a strictly delineated hierarchical pyramid with samurai at the top, merchants at the bottom, and farmers and craftsmen, the bulk of society, in the middle. During this time the population rose to about 30 million, roughly comparable to Canada or Peru today, and the city of Edo -- renamed Tokyo in 1868 -- was home to over 1.3 million residents. At the beginning of the Edo period, the people found that they had deforested their mountains and were suffering from a cascade of ill effects, such as damaged watersheds and decreasing agricultural productivity. Most resources, such as iron ore and potential fuel sources, were scarce; firewood itself was at a premium. Even more significantly, there was very little arable land, and by the mid-18th century all the land that could be used for farming was already utilized. The period began with shortages and famine, but after two or three generations of wise regeneration, the large population was enjoying a quality of life arguably higher than in any contemporary European country. The forests had been saved, agricultural production had increased manyfold, and culture and literacy were on the rise.

Beauty depended upon how well a thing helped people fulfill a host of unstated requirements that lent life its meaning and purpose and helped sustain it indefinitely into the future.

The specialization that so distinguishes our culture and technology today -- the very productive mental tools we have developed that enable us to break problems down into elements that can be worked on in isolation -- would seem very odd, even incomprehensible, to a Japanese of the Edo period.True, the society was rigidly stratified and in that sense specialized, and people worked for years to master specific trades. A miso shop was unlikely to sell kimonos. But the culture as a whole was pervaded by a sense of time in which outcomes were measured in centuries, and in which it was nearly impossible to plan even simple tasks without a broader awareness of chains of consequences that would emerge from one's actions, or of the origins, destinations, and connections among the people and things which supported human life like a vast web of interconnected spirit. As is the case in so many pre-industrial societies, people were trained from an early age to be generalists, to be multi-competent, and to always be aware of the big picture. Religion, particularly Zen Buddhism, but also Shinto and Confucianism, acted as a balanced bed of "common sense" which encouraged such thinking. Through the influence of these values, reflected in both commoner's proverbs and in the writings of the cultured elite, problems were defined in such a way that the need for long-term thinking, conservation of energy and resources, the need to work with instead of against natural forces, and the importance of providing meaningful work for everyone instead of endlessly seeking to minimize labor, became requirements so well understood they rarely needed to be explicitly stated.

http://www.dailygood.org/view.php?sid=317 - http://www.dailygood.org/view.php?sid=317


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 01 October 2014 at 5:24am

Why Your Health Is Bigger Than Your Body

New findings explain how politics, economics, and ecology can help or hurt our bodies.

Talking with Dr. Ted Schettler is probably unlike any conversation you have had with your physician. Raise the topic of breast cancer or diabetes or dementia, and Schettler starts talking about income disparities, industrial farming, and campaign finance reform.

The Harvard-educated physician, frustrated by the limitations of science in combating disease, believes that finding answers to the most persistent medical challenges of our time—conditions that now threaten to overwhelm our health care system—depends on understanding the human body as a system nested within a series of other, larger systems: one’s family and community, environment, culture, and socioeconomic class, all of which affect each other.

It is a complex, even daunting view—where does one begin when trying to solve problems this way?

Schettler, despite being steeped in traditional medicine, was unable to ignore these interrelationships: a degraded natural environment, a precarious local economy, and perennially sick people. “These things—the effect of the environment on peoples’ health—were never discussed at the medical conferences,” he said. “So it caused in me a major re-examination.”

Schettler went back to school, earned a master’s degree in public health, and began applying a scientist’s rigor to his wide-ranging pool of interests. Since then, he has researched connections between poverty, iron deficiency, and lead poisoning; insecticide use, Parkinson’s, and Alzheimer’s disease; income disparities and asthma.

He calls this new approach to medicine “the ecological paradigm of health.”

“It sounds like tree-huggers or something,” Schettler said in an interview. “But I mean ‘ecological’ in the sense that there are these multiple systems, one within the other—a family within a community, within a society, within a culture—and that’s the way ecologists tend to talk about ecosystems. It’s accepting up front that humans do not stand apart from the environment. We’re a major species, along with the mosquitoes and fish and trees and bacteria. And there are all of these wonderful interrelationships.”


http://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/its-your-body/why-your-health-is-bigger-than-your-body - http://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/its-your-body/why-your-health-is-bigger-than-your-body





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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 02 October 2014 at 2:23am

The 13-year-old who has the world planting trees

At the age of nine, Felix Finkbeiner hatched a plan to plant a million trees in his native Germany. Now he's a global eco-superhero

The answer to looming climate catastrophe: trees, lots of them.

What about the climate change skeptics?

'We children discussed this often,’ he told delegates at the UN in New York in January. 'We have an answer. If we follow the scientists that tell us there is a crisis and we act, and in 20 years we find out that they were wrong, we didn’t do any mistake. But if we follow the skeptics and in 20 years we find out that they were wrong, it will be too late to save our future.’

Adults, he cheekily told the assembled diplomats, are like monkeys. 'If you let a monkey choose if he wants one banana now or six bananas later, he always chooses the one banana now. We children [have] understood we cannot trust that adults alone will save our future. We have to take our future in our own hands.’

Felix is a gifted orator, unfettered by self-doubt, or by the complexity of the climate debate, and without the smug self-satisfaction that makes many overachieving children unbearable. He is all unaffected charm. Most of all, however, he has an ambition and instincts that are hard to characterize as anything other than political.

For example, 'we children’ is a phrase that he uses again and again, so often that it becomes clear that, as with Maathai, he is interested in achieving the political empowerment of a disenfranchised group through environmental work. Where she championed the rights of women, he is determined that children should have a voice. His reasoning is straightforward: 'For most adults the future seems to mean 20, 30 or even 40 years. But for us children 2100 could still be in our lifetime. For adults it is an academic question if sea levels rise three centimeters or seven meters by the end of this century. But for we children it is a question of survival.’


http://www.dailygood.org/more.php?n=5153 - http://www.dailygood.org/more.php?n=5153



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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 11 October 2014 at 3:57am

Free Your (Eco)Mind

Gradually it’s dawned on me: We humans are creatures of the mind. We perceive the world according to our core, often unacknowledged, assumptions. They determine, literally, what we can see and what we cannot. Nothing so wrong with that, perhaps—except that, in this crucial do-or-die moment, we’re stuck with a mental map that is life-destroying.

And the premise of this map is lack—not enough of anything, from energy to food to parking spots; not enough goods and not enough goodness. In such a world, we come to believe, it’s compete or die. The popular British writer Philip Pullman says, “we evolved to suit a way of life which is acquisitive, territorial, and combative” and that “we have to overcome millions of years of evolution” to make the changes we need to avoid global catastrophe.

If I believed that, I’d feel utterly hopeless. How can we align with the needs of the natural world if we first have to change basic human nature?

Fortunately, we don’t have to. A new way of seeing that is opening up to us can form a more life-serving mental map. I call it “eco-mind”—looking at the world through the lens of ecology. This worldview recognizes that we, no less than any other organism, live in relation to everything else. As the visionary German physicist Hans-Peter Dürr puts it, “There are no parts, only participants.”

As part of this shift, breakthroughs in a range of disciplines are confirming what we already know about ourselves, if we stop and think about it: That humans are complex creatures and what we do—from raising children to caring for elders to sharing with our neighbors—exhibits at least as much natural tendency to cooperate as to compete.


An eco-mind thinks ...

Less about quantities and more about qualities.

Less about fixed things and more about the ever-changing relationships that form them.

Less about limits and more about alignment.

Less about what and more about why.

Less about loss and more about possibility.


http://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/9-strategies-to-end-corporate-rule/free-your-eco-mind - http://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/9-strategies-to-end-corporate-rule/free-your-eco-mind




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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 15 October 2014 at 6:55am

Spiritual Ecology: The Cry of the Earth

Book Trailer

Showing the deep connection between our present ecological crisis and our lack of awareness of the sacred nature of creation, this series of essays from spiritual and environmental leaders around the world shows how humanity can transform its relationship with the Earth. Combining the thoughts and beliefs from a diverse range of essayists, this collection highlights the current ecological crisis and articulates a much-needed spiritual response to it. Perspectives from Buddhism, Sufism, Christianity, and Native American beliefs as well as physics, deep psychology, and other environmental disciplines, make this a well-rounded contribution.




http://vimeo.com/69037737 - http://vimeo.com/69037737



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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 21 October 2014 at 6:11am
Wendell Berry: Forget about big solutions to ecological emergency

Berry counsels hope. Yet, he’s not naive about the challenge of protecting everything valuable from destruction at the hands of greed.

    No amount of fiddling with capitalism to regulate and humanize it … can for long disguise its failure [to conserve the wealth and health of nature]. Eroded, wasted, or degraded soils; damaged or destroyed ecosystems; extinction of biodiversity, species; whole landscapes defaced, gouged, flooded, or blown up … thoughtless squandering of fossil fuels and fossil waters, of mine able minerals and ores, natural health and beauty replaced by a heartless and sickening ugliness. Perhaps its greatest success is an astounding increase in the destructiveness and therefore the profitability of war.

So, given that industrial capitalism is driving us all over the cliff, what’s there to be hopeful about?

First, it really doesn’t matter that the rich and their lackey governments will block big solutions because big projects don’t provide the real answer. Instead, the answer will come from millions of people in thousands of places around the world learning to love and then starting to defend those local places — both their nature and their culture.

Second, we need to accept that lots of little solutions may solve big problems well but, like all high quality work, it won’t happen quickly.

“This is the dreadful situation that young people are in. I think of them and I say well, the situation you’re in now is a situation that’s going to call for a lot of patience. And to be patient in an emergency is a terrible trial,” Berry says.

    I say to the young people, don’t get into this with the idea that you’re going to save it and solve all the problems even in your lifetime. The important thing to do is to learn all you can about where you are and if you’re going to work there it becomes even more important to learn everything you can about that place to make common cause with that place and then resigning yourself, becoming patient enough to work with it over a long time. And then what you do is increase the possibility that you will make a good example and what we’re looking for in this is good examples.

Watch Berry’s interview with Moyers and then spread it around the Web as an antidote to both complacency and cynicism.



http://transitionvoice.com/2013/10/wendell-berry-ecological-emergency-patience-and-hope/ - http://transitionvoice.com/2013/10/wendell-berry-ecological-emergency-patience-and-hope/


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 22 October 2014 at 7:47am
Green School in Bali

John Hardy's dream of building a green school comes alive in Bali. With bamboo architecture, no walls and a diverse range of teachers, this school not only teaches reading writing and arithmetic but also teaches how to reconnect to nature thus building future green leaders.

And you just have to follow these simple, simple rules: be local, let the environment lead and think about how your grandchildren might build...


http://www.ted.com/talks/john_hardy_my_green_school_dream?language=en - http://www.ted.com/talks/john_hardy_my_green_school_dream?language=en


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 28 October 2014 at 5:26pm
The Futility of Global Thinking----Abbreviated version of a commencement address given by poet Wendell Berry
at College of the Atlantic in Bar Harbor, Maine


"All public movements of thought quickly produce a language that works as a code, useless to the extent that it is abstract. It is readily evident, for example, that you can't conduct a relationship with another person in terms of rhetoric of the civil rights movement or the women's movement - as useful as those rhetorics may initially have been to personal relationships.

The same is true of the environment movement. The favorite adjective of this movement now seems to be planetary. This word is used, properly enough, to refer to the interdependence of places, and to the recognition, which is desirable and growing, that no place on the earth can be completely healthy until all places are. But the word planetary also refers to an abstract anxiety or an abstract passion that is desperate and useless exactly to the extent that it is abstract. How, after all, can anybody - any particular body - do anything to heal a planet? Nobody can do anything to heal a planet. The suggestion that anybody could do so is preposterous

The heroes of abstraction keep galloping in on their white horses to save the planet -- and they keep falling off in front of the grandstand. What we need, obviously, is a more intelligent - which is to say, a more accurate - description of the problem.

The description of a problem as planetary arouses a motivation for which, of necessity, there is no employment. The adjective planetary describes a problem in such a way that it cannot be solved. In fact, though we now have serious problems nearly everywhere on the planet, we have no problem that can accurately be described as planetary.

And, short of the total annihilation of the human race, there is no planetary solution. There are also no national, state, or country problems, and no national, state, or county solutions. That will-o'-the-wisp, the large-scale solution to the large-scale problem, which is so dear to governments, universities, and corporations, serves mostly to distract people from the small, private problems that they may, in fact, have the power to solve.

The problems, if we describe them accurately, are all private and small. Or they are so initially.

The problems are our lives.

In the "developed" countries, at least, the large problems occur because all of us are living either partly wrong or almost entirely wrong.

It was not just the greed of corporate shareholders and the hubris of corporate executives that put the fate of Prince William Sound into one ship; it was also our demand that energy be cheap and plentiful. The economies of our communities and households are wrong.

The answers to the human problems of ecology are to be found in economy. And the answers to the problems of economy are to be found in culture and in character. To fail to see this is to go on dividing the world falsely between guilty producers and innocent consumers.

The planetary versions - the heroic versions - of our problems have attracted great intelligence. Our problems, as they are caused and suffered in our lives, our households, and our communities, have attracted very little intelligence. There are some notable exceptions. A few people have learned to do a few things better.

But it is discouraging to reflect that, though we have been talking about most of our problems for decades, we are still mainly talking about them. The civil rights movement has not given us better communities. The women's movement has not given us better marriages or better households. The environment movement has not changes our parasitic relationship to nature. We have failed to produce new examples of good home and community economies, and we have nearly completed the destruction of the examples we once had.

Without examples, we are left with theory and the bureaucracy and the meddling that come with theory. We change our principles, our thoughts, and our words, but these are changes made in the air. Our lives go on unchanged. For the most part, the subcultures, the countercultures, the dissenters, and the opponents continue mindlessly - or perhaps just helplessly - to follow the pattern of the dominant society in its extravagance, its wastefulness, its dependencies, and its addictions.

The old problem remains: How do you get intelligence out of an institution or an organization? The question that must be addressed, therefore, is not how to care for the planet but how to care for each of the planet's millions of human and natural neighborhoods, each of its millions of small pieces and parcels of land, each one of which is in some precious way different from all the others.

Our understandable wish to preserve the planet must somehow be reduced to the scale of our competence - that is, to the wish to preserve all of its humble households and neighborhoods.

The religion and the environmentalism of the highly industrialized countries are at bottom a sham, because they make it their business to fight against something that they do not really wish to destroy. We all live by robbing nature, but our standard of living demands that the robbery shall continue. We must achieve the character and acquire the skills to live much poorer than we do. We must waste less. We must do more for ourselves and each other.

It is either that or continue merely to think and talk about changes that we are inviting catastrophe to make. The great obstacle is the conviction that we cannot change because we are dependent upon what is wrong. But that is the addict's excuse, and we know that it will not do. I am trying not to mislead you, or myself, about our situation. I think that we have hardly begun to realize the gravity of the mess we are in.

Our most serious problem, perhaps, is that we have become a nation of fantasists. We believe, apparently, in the infinite availability of finite resources. We persist in land-use methods that reduce the potentially infinite power of soil fertility to a finite quantity, which we then proceed to waste as if it were an infinite quantity. We have an economy that depends not upon the quality and quantity of necessary goods and services but on the behavior of a few stockbrokers.

We believe that democratic freedom can be preserved by people ignorant of the history of democracy and indifferent to the responsibilities of freedom. Our leaders have been for many years as oblivious to the realities and dangers of their time as were George III and Lord North. They believe that the difference between war and peace is still the overriding political difference - when, in fact, the difference has diminished to the point of insignificance.

How would you describe the difference between modern war and modern industry- between, say, bombing and strip mining, or between chemical warfare and chemical manufacturing? The difference seems to be only that in war the victimization of humans is directly intentional and in industry it is "accepted" as a "trade-off." Were the catastrophes of Love Canal, Chernobyl, and the Exxon Valdez episodes of war or of peace?

They were, in fact, peacetime acts of aggression, intentional to the extent that the risks were known and ignored. We are involved unremittingly in a war not against "foreign enemies" but against the world, against our freedom, and indeed against our existence. Our so-called industrial accidents should be looked upon as revenges of Nature. We forgot that Nature is necessarily party to all our enterprises and that it imposes conditions of its own.

Now Nature is plainly saying to us : "If you put the fates of whole communities or cities or regions or ecosystems at risk in single ships or factories or power plants, then I will furnish the drunk or the fool or the imbecile who will make the necessary small mistake."

And so, graduates, my advice to you is simply my hope for us all: Beware the justice of Nature. Understand that there can be no successful human economy apart from Nature or in defiance of Nature.

Understand that no amount of education can overcome the innate limits of human intelligence and responsibility. We are not smart enough or conscious enough or alert enough to work responsibly on a gigantic scale. In making things always bigger and more centralized, we make them both more vulnerable in themselves and more dangerous to everything else.

Learn, therefore, to prefer small-scale elegance and generosity to large-scale greed, crudity, and glamour.

Make a home.

Help to make a community.

Be loyal to what you have made.

Put the interest of the community first.

Love you neighbors - not the neighbors you pick out, but the ones you have.

Love this miraculous world that we did not make, that is a gift to us.

As far as you are able make your lives dependent upon your local place, neighborhood, and household - which thrive by care and generosity - and independent of the industrial economy, which thrives by damage.

Find work, if you can, that does no damage.

Enjoy your work. Work well."


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 30 October 2014 at 4:58pm
"We today are constantly greedy and we're encouraged to be greedy, particularly by advertising, which tries to persuade us to buy many things that we don't need. We're even encouraged to be greedy by government authorities, who want us to spend, spend, spend, because that is good for the economy, or so it is supposed.


But the world is flooded today in the West with all sorts of unnecessary goods, which we are encouraged to buy. In fact, one reason that we have people, particularly in England, working appalling long hours with little chance to be with their family, little energy to be with their children, working as they say to make ends meet, but working also because they need the money to buy a better television, a better this, a better that, to buy things that are not essential and are not really necessary. Now, Islam is very clear upon this point. Excess is condemned. And excessive greed is certainly and very powerfully condemned.


But very often we don't even recognize that we have become greedy people. . . . We don't need these things, but in demanding them, in wanting them, in buying them, we are in fact contributing, in the small way, individually, to the depletion of the resources of this planet. And this is something that is easy to forget because we shall not see immediate disaster as the result. It is our grandchildren and our great grandchildren who are likely to suffer.


It is a matter for the individual sometimes to sit back, particularly when they see a very tempting advertisement in the paper at morning, something reduced price, something they don't need, but all the same, you know, buying a bargain is saving money, or so we often feel, and it is a matter of thinking twice, of thinking three times, before rushing out to add to our possessions which we cannot take with us when we die, and which for the most part are not really necessary to our well-being in this life."   

~Charles le Gai Eaton (ra)~



http://www.livingislam.org/k/hges_e.html - http://www.livingislam.org/k/hges_e.html


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 05 November 2014 at 3:01pm
How to Worry Less about Money


Troubles are urgent. They ask for direct action. … By contrast, worries often say more about the worrier than about the world.

So, addressing money worries should be quite different from dealing with money troubles. To address our worries we have to give attention to the pattern of thinking (ideology) and to the scheme of values (culture) as these are played out in our won individual, private existences.

This is a problem because the theme of money is so deep and pervasive in our lives. One’s relationship with money is lifelong, it colors one’s sense of identity, it shapes one’s attitude to other people, it connects and splits generations; money is the arena in which greed and generosity are played out, in which wisdom is exercised and folly committed. Freedom, desire, power, status, work, possession: these huge ideas that rule life are enacted, almost always, in and around money.


Our worries — when it comes to money — are about psychology as much as economics, the soul as much as the bank balance.


The crucial developmental step in the economic lives of individuals and societies is their ability to cross from the pursuit of middle-order goods to higher-order goods. Sometimes we need to lessen our attachment to the middle needs like status and glamor in order to concentrate on higher things. This doesn’t take more money; it takes more independence of mind.

There are quite profound reasons why we should care simultaneously about having and doing. Both are connected to flourishing.

What we do with our lives is obviously central to who we are. What we expend our mental energy on, what we put our emotional resources into, where we deploy courage or daring or prudence or commitment: these are major parts of existence and are inevitably much connected with work and earning money. And we need these parts of existence in order to find proper application in activities that deserve our best efforts. We don’t’ want to reserve our central capacities for the margins and weekends of life.

Money does not liberate people in the way that we assume it must.

There is a very imperfect relationship between desire and flourishing.
Desire aims at pleasure. Whereas the achievement of a good life depends upon the good we create. And the opportunity to follow whatever desire one might happen to have is the enemy of the effort, concentration, devotion, patience and self-sacrifice that are necessary if we are to achieve worthwhile ends.

       
-John Armstrong




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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 06 November 2014 at 2:19pm
Something quite serious has been lost. . . . This decline in general-interest science coverage comes at a time of divergent directions in the general public. At one level, there seems to be increasing ignorance. After all, it’s not just science news coverage that has suffered, but also the teaching of science in schools. And we just went through a political season that saw how all this can play out, with major political figures spouting off one silly statement after another, particularly about women’s health. . . .

But something else is going on, as well. Even as we have in some pockets what seems like increasing ignorance of science, we have at the same time, a growing interest of many. It’s easy to see, from where I sit, how high that interest is. Articles about anything scientific, from the current findings in human evolution to the latest rover landing on Mars, not to mention new genetic approaches to cancer — and yes, even the Higgs boson — zoom to the top of our newspaper’s most emailed list.

We know our readers love science and cannot get enough of it. And it’s not just our readers. As the rover Curiosity approached Mars, people of all ages in all parts of the country had “Curiosity parties” to watch news of the landing. Mars parties! Social media, too, has shown us how much interest there is across the board, with YouTube videos and tweets on science often becoming instant megahits.

So what we have is a high interest and a lot of misinformation floating around. And we have fewer and fewer places that provide real information to a general audience that is understandable, at least by those of us who do not yet have our doctorates in astrophysics. The disconnect is what we should all be worried about.


~Barbara Strauch, science editor of The New York Times ~





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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 07 November 2014 at 6:32am
Most of the smart people I know want nothing to do with politics. We avoid it like the plague — like Edge avoids it, in fact. Is this because we feel that politics isn’t where anything significant happens? Or because we’re too taken up with what we’re doing, be it Quantum Physics or Statistical Genomics or Generative Music? Or because we’re too polite to get into arguments with people? Or because we just think that things will work out fine if we let them be — that The Invisible Hand or The Technosphere will mysteriously sort them out?


Whatever the reasons for our quiescence, politics is still being done — just not by us. It’s politics that gave us Iraq and Afghanistan and a few hundred thousand casualties. It’s politics that’s bleeding the poorer nations for the debts of their former dictators. It’s politics that allows special interests to run the country. It’s politics that helped the banks wreck the economy.

But we don’t do politics. We expect other people to do it for us, and grumble when they get it wrong. We feel that our responsibility stops at the ballot box, if we even get that far. After that we’re as laissez-faire as we can get away with.

What worries me is that while we’re laissez-ing, someone else is faire-ing.


~Music Pioneer Brian Eno (Generative Music) ~


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 08 November 2014 at 4:39pm
An Antidote for Paradoxical Times


When the student body of an elite private school in Silicon Valley was given the chance to vote on who would give their graduation address, their first pick was Nipun Mehta. An unexpected choice for these teenagers, who belong to what Time magazine called the "Me Me Me Generation." Mehta's journey is the antithesis of self-serving. More than a decade ago, he walked away from a lucrative career in high-tech, to explore the connection between inner change and external impact. ServiceSpace, the non-profit he founded has now drawn over 450,000 members across the globe. In this electrifying address that garnered a standing ovation, Nipun calls out the paradoxical crisis of disconnection in our hyper-connected world -- and offers up three powerful keys that hold the antidote.



http://www.karmatube.org/videos.php?id=4300 - http://www.karmatube.org/videos.php?id=4300


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 09 November 2014 at 3:02pm
Interview with James Seeba: Medicine Journey

Seeba: I would say the observation—the fact—that in the maintenance of health the most difficult issues are the most simple, most fundamental, and least emphasized. That is, the degradation of the food chain, our water, and our air, and conditions of our general social life. It’s absolutely the easiest thing in the world to leave out, the most difficult to address. Without addressing that in the vast majority of clinical situations, at best, your results are going to be limited, I think. I’m not speaking of crisis situations, but of general health and long term results. That I’ve verified for myself over and over again. Whether it’s arthritis, or chronic sinusitis, digestive problems, tumor formation, auto-immune illnesses, chronic fatigue, whatever it is, sooner or later you’ve got to back and look at what people are eating, how they’re eating, the type of water they’re drinking, and how they’re living. This is absolutely central. The way out of these problems are varied, and this is where the practice of medicine gets very interesting because there are a lot of different ways up the mountain. But without addressing these things the fundamental health problems are not getting addressed, in my opinion. These are probably the most important factors in the now epidemic degeneration of the health of our people in the industrialized world.

So you keep going back to the very basics of life which is the food you eat. All biochemical processes are tied to the food, and the air, and the water you drink. Common sense would have you go back to that. But it’s not taken with the kind of seriousness in the medical profession it should be, not even approaching what it should be. And frankly, there’s not a lot of money to be made from a type of medicine where you have to use substances that are non-patentable, for instance. So there’s no interest in trying to relate to this natural process involving the food and the air and how to deal with illnesses with therapies that are ecologically related to our own place in evolution, therapies that make use of botanicals naturally existing which have similar effects to those of analog medicines— because there’s no money in it. You can’t patent them and so there’s no impetus to use them.

Progesterone is a very good example. Progesterone is a product that many cultures, when you examine them, have used. For instance, among the Triaband people there isn’t even a word for menopause. There’s no concept of this passage, no breast cancer, endometriosis, ovarian tumors, etc. Of course, they have other health problems. But what we see is that on a daily basis they are eat a plant, the diascoria plant, which is where progesterone comes from. All progesterones have always come from the wild yam plant, but in order to sell it as a non-botanical, which means you can patent it, the molecule gets changed a little bit. It’s crazy. You have a molecule that’s more or less identical to the body’s naturally occuring one, and for economic reasons you change it a little and get "progestogen" which is given to women and has all kinds of side effects. You see that over and over again—the controversy between botanical, or planttract medicines and "artificial" or "man-made" medicines.

It comes back to this lack of appreciation of the very basics of health which goes back to agriculture and our attitudes toward natural products vs. "man-made" products, and to our attempts to manipulate processes that have been on the planet for a long, long time, without taking into account what the effects of that might be. As a result we end up with the situation we have in the world today which by anyone’s account has to be described as an epidemic of degenerative illnesses in the industrialized world. It even has some biologists contemplating the extinction of our species because the environmental estrogens are ubiquitous now. There has been about a 40% decrease in the sperm count in men since the introduction of these products into our environment. Taking that out on a straight line projection and you can see what could happen.

RW: I wonder if there’s a kind of direct analogy between the disorders of the body and the disorders of society? Perhaps so.

Seeba: Indeed. One of the chief complaints that I hear clinically, is fatigue. So, how do you address fatigue? If, in your whole world what’s of value is stimulation and activity, and you’ve got fatigue, my goodness sakes, what are you up against? You see the confrontation—between our world where activity is the value, and your own physical situation, which is lack of energy. You’ve got all these little short term solutions, sugar, coffee, alcohol, cigarettes, drugs that stimulate. Or, if the pain of it all is too much, there are the drugs that obliterate. It’s not a question of why I’m exhausted, but of finding strategies of getting enough energy to face the next day. And the very things being used to get to the next day eventually will cause a collapse somewhere.



http://www.conversations.org/story.php?sid=18 - http://www.conversations.org/story.php?sid=18


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 10 November 2014 at 4:29am
Why The Economist’s recent assault on “ethical food” missed the mark

The sustainable-food movement’s very DNA is shot through with a commitment to political engagement. “Eat responsibly,” declared Wendell Berry in his seminal 1990 essay “The Pleasures of Eating.” By that, he didn’t mean blithely hop into the SUV and head to a national supermarket chain to pick up a pricey bag of anonymously grown organic salad, as The Economist‘s caricature would have it.

Instead, Berry urged people to become active participants in food production. He hoped that by gaining knowledge about where food comes from, people would become more, not less, politically engaged. The feel-good consumerism skewered by The Economist has little to do with Berry’s influential ethos of knowing and active participation — an intellectual tradition that thrives today in the work of Michael Pollan and other writers.

If The Economist‘s overriding premise — that the sustainable-food movement has decayed into a sort of self-congratulating shopping club — is fundamentally ridiculous, it doesn’t do much better on the particulars.

To make the case that organic farming threatens tropical rainforests, the magazine trots out Nobel laureate Norman Borlaug, perhaps industrial agriculture’s greatest apologist. Borlaug, a sort of anti-Wendell Berry, spearheaded the Green Revolution movement, financed by U.S. foundations, to promote the use of hybrid seeds, pesticides, and fertilizers by farmers in the global south.



But is chemical-dependent farming really more productive than organic? Samuel Fromartz, author of Organic Inc., debunked that claim in a recent comment on Gristmill. Fromartz points out that chemical farming may churn out more food per acre under ideal conditions, but over the long term — including drought periods — the yield difference dwindles. Moreover, pummeling the soil with chemicals may eventually sap land of any productivity at all. As Fromartz points out, India — which bought Borlaug’s Green Revolution package wholesale, and is often cited as one of the effort’s great successes — is now experiencing a severe soil- and water-depletion crisis.

The magazine wants us to return to the chain supermarkets and spend our energy instead on pushing politicians toward action in the form of “a global carbon tax; reform of the world trade system; and the abolition of agricultural tariffs and subsidies.”

It’s bizarre advice, coming from a free-market magazine: severely limit your own options and ask the government to solve your problems. And while the political goals it supports are no doubt worthy, they in no way absolve citizens from the need to wrest control of their food decisions from corporations and actively create the food system they want.



http://grist.org/article/economist/ - http://grist.org/article/economist/


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 12 November 2014 at 2:34am
prophetic Guidelines for caring for the Environment

1.Plant a tree even if it is your last deed.

2.Planting trees is a renewable source of Hasanat.

3.Conserve resources even when used for rituals.

4.Keeping environment clean is important.

5.No for Over-Consumption!Consider recycling and fixing before buying new items.

6.Animals should be cared for...

The green hadiths mentioned in the context...


http://www.onislam.net/english/oimedia/onislamen/images/media/2014/glimpses-from-the-prophet-part-1.pdf - http://www.onislam.net/english/oimedia/onislamen/images/media/2014/glimpses-from-the-prophet-part-1.pdf

(Page 19-24)


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 01 December 2014 at 2:35am
Escaping the Matrix
By Richard K. Moore     


Richard K. Moore is an expatriate software programmer from Silicon Valley who has lived for the past six years in rural Ireland. However, capitalizing on one of the better side effects of globalization, he and Canadian collaborator Jan Slakov have coordinated Internet discussions about new economic and political paradigms among hundreds of people worldwide, via e-mail lists and the Citizens for a Democratic Renaissance Web site. This article is a distillation of Moore's book-in-progress, which can be found in fuller form at http://cyberjournal.org. Richard can be reached at richard@cyberjournal.org.

The defining dramatic moment in the film The Matrix [Warner Bros., 1999] occurs just after Morpheus invites Neo to choose between a red pill and a blue pill. The red pill promises "the truth, nothing more." Neo takes the red pill and awakes to reality?something utterly different from anything Neo, or the audience, could have expected. What Neo had assumed to be reality turns out to be only a collective illusion, fabricated by the Matrix and fed to a population that is asleep, cocooned in grotesque embryonic pods. In Plato's famous parable about the shadows on the walls of the cave, true reality is at least reflected in perceived reality. In the Matrix world, true reality and perceived reality exist on entirely different planes.

The story is intended as metaphor, and the parallels that drew my attention had to do with political reality. This article offers a particular perspective on what's going on in the world and how things got to be that way in this era of globalization. From that red-pill perspective, everyday media-consensus reality like the Matrix in the film is seen to be a fabricated collective illusion. Like Neo, I didn't know what I was looking for when my investigation began, but I knew that what I was being told didn't make sense. I read scores of histories and biographies, observing connections between them, and began to develop my own theories about roots of various historical events.

I found myself largely in agreement with writers like Noam Chomsky and Michael Parenti, but I also perceived important patterns that others seemed to have missed. When I started tracing historical forces, and began to interpret present-day events from a historical perspective, I could see the same old dynamics at work and found a meaning in unfolding events far different from what official pronouncements proclaimed. Such pronouncements are, after all, public relations fare, given out by politicians who want to look good to the voters. Most of us expect rhetoric from politicians, and take what they say with a grain of salt. But as my own picture of present reality came into focus, "grain of salt" no longer worked as a metaphor. I began to see that consensus reality as generated by official rhetoric and amplified by mass media bears very little relationship to actual reality. "The matrix" was a metaphor I was ready for.

In consensus reality (the blue-pill perspective) "left" and "right" are the two ends of the political spectrum. Politics is a tug-of-war between competing factions, carried out by political parties and elected representatives. Society gets pulled this way and that within the political spectrum, reflecting the interests of whichever party won the last election. The left and right are therefore political enemies. Each side is convinced that it knows how to make society better; each believes the other enjoys undue influence; and each blames the other for the political stalemate that apparently prevents society from dealing effectively with its problems.

This perspective on the political process, and on the roles of left and right, is very far from reality. It is a fabricated collective illusion. Morpheus tells Neo that the Matrix is "the world that was pulled over your eyes to hide you from the truth....As long as the Matrix exists, humanity cannot be free." Consensus political reality is precisely such a matrix. Later we will take a fresh look at the role of left and right, and at national politics. But first we must develop our red-pill historical perspective. I've had to condense the arguments to bare essentials; please see the annotated sources at the end for more thorough treatments of particular topics...

http://www.wholeearth.com/issue/2101/article/130/escaping.the.matrix - http://www.wholeearth.com/issue/2101/article/130/escaping.the.matrix

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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 04 December 2014 at 3:56pm

The Economics of Happiness Film Trailer




The Economics of Happiness describes a world moving simultaneously in two opposing directions. On the one hand, government and big business continue to promote globalization and the consolidation of corporate power. At the same time, people around the world are resisting those policies – and, far from the old institutions of power, they’re starting to forge a very different future. Communities are coming together to re-build more human scale, ecological economies based on a new paradigm – an economics of localization.





http://www.theeconomicsofhappiness.org - http://www.theeconomicsofhappiness.org

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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 14 January 2015 at 4:06pm
What is Ecopedagogy?

Ecopedagogy is a discourse, a movement, and an approach to education that has emerged from leftist educators in Central and South America including Paulo Freire, Moacir Gadotti and Leonardo Boff that seeks to re-educate “planetary citizens” to care for, respect and take action for all life. How can we, as citizens of the planet, participate in the creation of a world that we want instead of simply observing those who are profiting off of extraction and exploitation create our world for us? What does an education look like that can encourage people to face what is happening, take responsibility for ourselves and work to create healthy, vibrant resilient communities that serve everyone, no one excluded. What kind of education is really relevant today, given our current social and ecological crisis? How is traditional environmental education not relevant? These are some of the questions that are asked by ecopedagogy, which it attempts respond to.

Okay, but what is it really?

As a movement and an approach to education, Ecopedagogy is alive; it is open and fluid to be defined by its practitioners who engage critically with it. In this way it remains continuously relevant. There are however, some basic principles outlined in the Ecopedagogy Charter, which have been elaborated and interpreted by subsequent works. Some of these principles include;

Popular Education: Ecopedagogy is an extension of Paulo Freire’s seminal work, Pedagogy of the Oppressed. Many of the concepts of power and oppression are expanded to include the non-human world as oppressed as well. As a heir of Pedagogy of the Oppressed, Ecopedagogy is grounded in popular education in which power is shared, participatory dialogue is the key methodology, learning leads to action, and learning starts from and responds to the learner’s lived experiences.


Post-Issue activism: Issues of social and economic justice, democracy and ecologal integrity intersect and are interdependent. Ultimately none of them are possible without all of them intact. Educators can choose which ever issue their learners are most personally connected with however as an “entry point” or location to start from to then move towards an integrated understanding of the others.


Planetary Citizenship: Our lived reality is becoming globalized, we should globalize our sense of community, responsibilities and our commitments as well.


Art Education: Ecopedagogy encourages people to develop the capacity to feel, intuit, imagine, create, relate, and express themselves. In this way we move from object to subject, able to participate in articulating and creating the world we want. This implies that the multiple languages/ intelligences of theatre, music, visual art, photography, dance etc. are fundamental to engage with as tools of expression and creation in the educational project.


Care: Dis-care of each other and of the planet has contributed to our current planetary crisis. Care can “conjure the strength to search for peace in the midsts of conflict”, “rescue the dignity of the condemned” and “permit a revolution of tenderness to prioritize the social over the individual.” ~Leonardo Boff, “Saber Cuidar”.


"Unless and until we have assigned meaning to our experience of our place, the earth, our bodies, the world as holy- we cast meaning outside of ourselves to “the closest and shiniest thing” Modern reference point for meaning and identity is consistently placed onto external authority, the media and fads, instead of from within. We need fellowship and communion- we are given a grafted version of “common experience”- but this does not offer relationship with the earth or communities." ~ Frank MacEowen



http://www.practicingfreedom.org/offerings/ecopedagogy/ - http://www.practicingfreedom.org/offerings/ecopedagogy/

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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 15 January 2015 at 4:17pm
“How people themselves perceive what they are doing is not a question that interests me. I mean, there are very few people who are going to look into the mirror and say, 'That person I see is a savage monster'; instead, they make up some construction that justifies what they do. If you ask the CEO of some major corporation what he does he will say, in all honesty, that he is slaving 20 hours a day to provide his customers with the best goods or services he can and creating the best possible working conditions for his employees. But then you take a look at what the corporation does, the effect of its legal structure, the vast inequalities in pay and conditions, and you see the reality is something far different.”

“Modern industrial civilisation has developed within a certain system of convenient myths. The driving force of modern industrial civilisation has been individual material gain, which is accepted as legitimate, even praiseworthy, on the grounds that private vices yield public benefits in the classic formulation.

Now, it's long been understood very well that a society that is based on this principle will destroy itself in time. It can only persist with whatever suffering and injustice it entails as long as it's possible to pretend that the destructive forces that humans create are limited: that the World is an infinite resource, and that the World is an infinite garbage-can. At this stage of History, either one of two things is possible: either the general population will take control of its own destiny and will concern itself with community-interests, guided by values of solidarity and sympathy and concern for others; or, alternatively, there will be no destiny for anyone to control.

As long as some specialised class is in a position of authority, it is going to set policy in the special interests that it serves. But the conditions of survival, let alone justice, require rational social planning in the interests of the community as a whole and, by now, that means the Global Community. The question is whether privileged élites should dominate mass-communication, and should use this power as they tell us they must, namely, to impose necessary illusions, manipulate and deceive the stupid majority, and remove them from the public arena. The question, in brief, is whether Democracy and Freedom are values to be preserved or threats to be avoided. In this possibly-terminal phase of human existence, Democracy and Freedom are more than values to be treasured, they may well be essential to survival.”

“Responsibility I believe accrues through privilege. People like you and me have an unbelievable amount of privilege and therefore we have a huge amount of responsibility. We live in free societies where we are not afraid of the police; we have extraordinary wealth available to us by global standards. If you have those things, then you have the kind of responsibility that a person does not have if he or she is slaving seventy hours a week to put food on the table; a responsibility at the very least to inform yourself about power. Beyond that, it is a question of whether you believe in moral certainties or not.”

“..people would like to think there's somebody up there who knows what he's doing. Since we don't participate, we don't control and we don't even think about the questions of crucial importance, we hope somebody is paying attention who has some competence. Let's hope the ship has a captain, in other words, since we're not taking in deciding what's going on. I think that's a factor. But also, it is an important feature of the ideological system to impose on people the feeling that they are incompetent to deal with these complex and important issues; they'd better leave it to the captain. One device is to develop a star system, an array of figures who are often media creations or creations of the academic propaganda establishment, whose deep insights we are supposed to admire and to whom we must happily and confidently assign the right to control our lives and control international affairs.”

“...the qualifications that I have to speak on world affairs are exactly the same ones Henry Kissinger has, and Walt Rostow has, or anybody in the Political Science Department, professional historians—none, none that you don't have. The only difference is, I don't pretend to have qualifications, nor do I pretend that qualifications are needed. I mean, if somebody were to ask me to give a talk on quantum physics, I'd refuse—because I don't understand enough. But world affairs are trivial: there's nothing in the social sciences or history or whatever that is beyond the intellectual capacities of an ordinary fifteen-year-old. You have to do a little work, you have to do some reading, you have to be able to think but there's nothing deep—if there are any theories around that require some special kind of training to understand, then they've been kept a carefully guarded secret.”

“Look, part of the whole technique of disempowering people is to make sure that the real agents of change fall out of history, and are never recognized in the culture for what they are. So it's necessary to distort history and make it look as if Great Men did everything - that's part of how you teach people they can't do anything, they're helpless, they just have to wait for some Great Man to come along and do it for them.”


“We shouldn't be looking for heroes, we should be looking for good ideas.”


“All over the place, from the popular culture to the propaganda system, there is constant pressure to make people feel that they are helpless, that the only role they can have is to ratify decisions and to consume.
Neoliberal democracy. Instead of citizens, it produces consumers. Instead of communities, it produces shopping malls. The net result is an atomized society of disengaged individuals who feel demoralized and socially powerless."

“If you assume that there is no hope, you guarantee that there will be no hope. If you assume that there is an instinct for freedom, that there are opportunities to change things, then there is a possibility that you can contribute to making a better world.Optimism is a strategy for making a better future. Because unless you believe that the future can be better, you are unlikely to step up and take responsibility for making it so.”




― Noam Chomsky


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 16 January 2015 at 5:13pm
ON TRANSFORMING OUR WORLD:
Critical Pedagogy for Interfaith Education



Religions, as traditions and bodies of thought, ethics, and practices, persuade adherents to look beyond themselves as individuals and consider their wider connectedness. Religious identities are communal in nature. They assert a shared humanity and compel a critical examination of our obligations to others in our own communities and beyond our own communities.

However, valuable resources offered by religions are often overshadowed by the struggles religious traditions face both internally and in their relationships with each other. Interfaith education finds its greatest challenges in addressing the hegemonic tendencies of religions, through which one tradition has dominated another; the histories of violence found within many of our religious traditions; and the exclusivist and triumphalist strands within religious traditions that promote intolerance and discrimination. There is a need to acknowledge the role of power both among and within religious traditions.How we define the religious other may have less to do with the other than it does with 'our' world, our own religious tradition. It is important then that we work to uncover the biases and assumptions that inform our thinking, and that we recognize the ways in which we might be tacitly complicit, or actively involved, in reinforcing oppression and hegemony. Yet, creating educational practices that address these issues is challenging.

Critical pedagogy is a pedagogical method, philosophy, and movement that has been developed within the past thirty or so years. This pedagogical approach seeks to promote educational experiences that are transformative, empowering, transgressive, and even subversive. Paulo Freire's Pedagogy of the Oppressed, which aims at helping students find a sense of agency in their lives through the process of "conscientization," is generally regarded as the foundational text of this approach."

From Freire's "pedagogy of the oppressed" to bell hooks's feminist pedagogy which aims at promoting "education as the practice of freedom," critical pedagogy has taken many forms. While it is difficult to arrive at a single definition of critical pedagogy, the various approaches to critical pedagogy share common themes. One is the questioning of how power operates in the construction of knowledge. As bell hooks explains, "More than ever before . . . educators are compelled to confront the biases that have shaped teaching practices in our society and to create new ways of knowing, different strategies for the sharing of knowledge."This involves rethinking a number of aspects of educational practices, including who makes the decisions about what and how to learn, who does the talking, and who takes the responsibility for learning. It also entails reassessing by who and how learning is gauged. Henry Giroux, another important theorist of critical pedagogy, identifies a common set of problems that various approaches to critical pedagogy all address in some way. "These problems include but are not limited to the relationship between knowledge and power, language and experience, ethics and authority, student agency and transformative politics, and teacher location and student formations."

Palmer tells us, "Because reality is communal, we learn best by interacting with it."

There is a need to explore the positive potential that religions have to offer our world. Far too often in our society today, people focus on the negative contributions that religions make to the world—fanaticism, zealotry, and triumphalism leading to discrimination, conflict and violence. Many people are so accustomed to this negative spin that they believe these tendencies reflect the true nature of religions, rather than a distortion of religions. Yet, many of the greatest leaders and social reformers of our time have been motivated by religious convictions—Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Dorothy Day, Mahatma Gandhi, Nelson Mandela.

The promise of critical interfaith pedagogy at its best is a process of engaging difference, coming to know others and ourselves, realizing the claims of community upon our lives, and providing the impetus and even the resources to work for constructive social change. As educators cultivate critical interfaith education, we are cultivating the capacity to transform our world.


http://www.crosscurrents.org/Puett2005.htm - http://www.crosscurrents.org/Puett2005.htm

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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 17 January 2015 at 2:57pm
“They’re driven by love. And they’re fierce.”
From Native activists to urban youth, new leadership finds ways to deal with climate chaos.


The climate crisis is no longer a future danger: Extreme weather, water shortages, heat waves, and flooding are here now. And the impacts of burning fossil fuels continue to worsen.



Why has it taken so long to respond? Naomi Klein’s new book, This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. the Climate, explores that question. Klein points to the “terrible timing” of the climate crisis coming into public awareness—with NASA scientist James Hansen’s 1988 testimony to Congress—right at the time free-market “neoliberal” ideology was on the rise. This ideology led to:

1) Anti-government sentiment, austerity budgets, tax cuts, and deregulation, which undercut government’s ability to lead a transition to a clean economy and to protect residents from climate impacts.

2) Global trade deals that override environmental regulations and local green-jobs initiatives.

3) Privatization of sectors needed to transition to renewables.

But Germany has gone the other direction, Klein reports. Taking back their electric utilities helped Germany generate a record 27 percent of electricity from renewables this year. Unlike many who write about climate change, Klein goes beyond analysis of the crisis. She reports on the grassroots activists who are standing up to the coal, tar sands, and gas industries and building alternatives that are green and just. These are the powerful people’s movements that together, she says, could “change everything.”


van Gelder: You talk in your book about the “unfinished liberation struggles.” Many of the people’s movements we celebrate—civil rights, anti-apartheid, women’s rights—succeeded in some ways, but failed to win economic power. Did you see in the People’s Climate March renewed attention to these “unfinished liberation struggles”?

Klein: The kind of hope that climate action represents—to people in the South Bronx and other low-income communities of color in the U.S., but also in countries like Bolivia—is because it directly addresses foundational issues around why our societies are so unequal. Colonialism predates coal, but coal supercharged the colonial project, allowing the pillaging of the Global South, and locked us into these incredibly unequal extractive relationships.


We in the Global North have built up an ecological debt. Fossil fuels built the modern world. And the countries that have a 200-year head start on emitting carbon have a special responsibility to both cut emissions first and fastest, and also to help countries that have not been contributing to this problem for nearly as long to leapfrog over fossil fuels and not be forced to choose between poverty and pollution. This is a process by which we begin to heal these colonial wounds.

And so, yeah, I talk about this as the unfinished business of liberation because so many of the past great social movements won on the legal and cultural sides but not on the economic side. There never were reparations for slavery. There never were the investments in the public sphere that the Civil Rights movement demanded.

So the dream is that in responding to climate change through a justice lens—through a lens that is not afraid to look at history and the real roots of inequality—we build a movement of movements that brings together all of these struggles. The hope is that climate is the biggest tent—it’s our atmosphere. We just have to know we’re all in the tent.

http://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/cities-are-now/naomi-klein-on-climate-heroes-who-inspire-her - http://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/cities-are-now/naomi-klein-on-climate-heroes-who-inspire-her

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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 25 January 2015 at 3:43pm
Degrowth, the Book

In industrialized societies, where so many people regard economic growth as the essence of human progress, the idea of deliberately rejecting growth is seen as insane. Yet that is more or less what the planet’s ecosystems are saying right now about the world economy.

The editors -- Giacomo D’Alisa, Federico Demaria, Giorgios Kallis – are three scholars at the Autonomous University of Barcelona, Spain, and members of the group Research & Degrowth. The editors describe degrowth as “a rejection of the illusion of growth and a call to repoliticize the public debate colonized by the idiom of economism.” The basic idea is to find new ways to achieve “the democratically-led shrinking of production and consumption with the aim of achieving social justice and ecological sustainability.”

Here’s how the book jacket describes the volume:

We live in an era of stagnation, rapid impoverishment, rising inequalities and socio-ecological disasters. In the dominant discourse, these are effects of economic crisis, lack of growth or underdevelopment. This book argues that growth is the cause of these problems and that it has become uneconomic, ecologically unsustainable and intrinsically unjust.

When the language in use is inadequate to articulate what begs to be articulated, then it is time for a new vocabulary. A movement of activists and intellectuals, first starting in France and then spreading to the rest of the world, has called for the decolonization of public debate from the idiom of economism and the abolishment of economic growth as a social objective. ‘Degrowth’ (‘décroissance’) has come to signify for them the desired direction of societies that will use fewer natural resources and will organize themselves to live radically differently. ‘Simplicity’, ‘conviviality’, ‘autonomy’, ‘care’, ‘commons’ and ‘dépense’ are some of the words that express what a degrowth society might look like.


http://bollier.org/blog/degrowth-book - http://bollier.org/blog/degrowth-book

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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 26 January 2015 at 6:54am

Wendell Berry


http://tune.pk/video/5769569/wendell-berry - http://tune.pk/video/5769569/wendell-berry


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 27 January 2015 at 6:40am
“The deep ecologists warn us not to be anthropocentric, but I know no way to look at the world, settled or wild, except through my own human eyes. I know that is wasn't created especially for my use, and I share the guilt for what members of my species, especially the migratory ones, have done to it. But I am the only instrument that I have access to by which I can enjoy the world and try to understand it. So I must believe that, at least to human perception, a place is not a place until people have been born in it, have grown up in it, have lived in it, known it, died in it--have both experienced and shaped it, as individuals, families, neighborhoods, and communities, over more than one generation. Some are born in their place, some find it, some realize after long searching that the place they left is the one they have been searching for. But whatever their relation to it, it is made a place only by slow accrual, like a coral reef.”

“We have been cut off, the past has been ended and the family has broken up and the present is adrift in its wheelchair. ... That is no gap between the generations, that is a gulf. The elements have changed, there are whole new orders of magnitude and kind. [...]

My grandparents had to live their way out of one world and into another, or into several others, making new out of old the way corals live their reef upward. I am on my grandparents' side. I believe in Time, as they did, and in the life chronological rather than in the life existential. We live in time and through it, we build our huts in its ruins, or used to, and we cannot afford all these abandonings.”


“It is not an unusual life curve for Westerners - to live i n and be shaped by the bigness, sparseness, space clarity & hopefulness of the West, to go away for study and enlargement and the perspective that distance and dissatisfaction can give, and then to return to what pleases the sight and enlists the loyalty and demands the commitment.”



“The moderns, carrying little baggage of the kind that Shelly called "merely cultural," not even living in the traditional air, but breathing into their space helmets a scientific mixture of synthetic gases (and polluted at that) are the true pioneers. Their circuitry seems to include no atavistic domestic sentiment, they have suffered empathectomy, their computers hum no ghostly feedback of Home, Sweet Home. How marvelously free they are! How unutterably deprived!”

“[The modern age] knows nothing about isolation and nothing about silence. In our quietest and loneliest hour the automatic ice-maker in the refrigerator will cluck and drop an ice cube, the automatic dishwasher will sigh through its changes, a plane will drone over, the nearest freeway will vibrate the air. Red and white lights will pass in the sky, lights will shine along highways and glance off windows. There is always a radio that can be turned to some all-night station, or a television set to turn artificial moonlight into the flickering images of the late show. We can put on a turntable whatever consolation we most respond to, Mozart or Copland or the Grateful Dead.”

"We simply need that wild country available to us, even if we never do more than drive to its edge and look in. For it can be a means of reassuring ourselves of our sanity as creatures, a part of the geography of hope."

"The wilderness idea has helped form our character and has shaped our history as a people. It has no more to do with recreation than churches have to do with recreation. Something will have gone out of us as a people if we ever let the remaining wilderness be destroyed, if we permit the last virgin forests to be turned into comic books and plastic cigarette cases, if we drive the few remaining species into zoos, or to extinction, if we pollute the last clear air and dirty the last clean streams and push our paved roads through the last of the silence, so that never again will Americans be free in their own country, from the noise, the exhaust, the stinks of human and automotive waste, and so that never again can we have the chance to see ourselves single, separate, vertical and individual in the world, part of the environment of trees and rocks and soil, brother to the other animals, part of the natural world and competent to belong in it."

"Without any remaining wilderness we are committed wholly, without chance for even momentary reflection and rest, to a headlong drive into our technological termite life, the brave new world of a completely man-controlled environment. We need wilderness preserved, as much of it as is still left and as many kinds because it was the challenge against which our character as a people was formed. The reminder and reassurance that it is still there is good for our spiritual health even if we never once in 10 years set foot in it. It is good for us when we are young because of the incomparable sanity it can bring briefly as vacation and rest into our insane lives. It is important to us when we are old simply because it is there. Important that it is, simply as idea. The frontier was necessary. For an American, insofar as he is new any different at all, is a civilized man who has renewed himself in the wild."


“[Y]ou were too alert to the figurative possibilities of words not to see the phrase [angle of repose] as descriptive of human as well as detrital rest. As you said, it was too good for mere dirt; you tried to apply it to your own wandering and uneasy life ... I wonder if you ever reached it...”

― Wallace Stegner


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 28 January 2015 at 4:55pm
TRANSCRIPT FOR SETH GODIN — THE ART OF NOTICING, AND THEN CREATING

MS. TIPPETT: I want to start with where I usually start my interviews, whoever I'm talking to. And actually in all that I've seen you write across the years, I haven't heard you talk about this too much. Was there a spiritual background to your childhood?

MR. GODIN: Well, I grew up with two incredible parents and learned a lot about faith. There wasn't a lot of religion and there was a lot of faith. And that dichotomy I think is really important, and it's informed a lot of the way I lived and what I've written about. And by faith I mean faith in community, faith in charity and in philanthropy, faith in innovation and what happens when people make a ruckus or do hard work, faith in education, faith in taking initiative. I mean I was a free-range kid...

I grew up in the this house where there was this understanding that if someone didn't have a place to go they stayed with you. And that if there was a way to help, you helped. And, you know, we weren't the most well-off people in town, but my parents understood that they had a position and a role in the community, and any chance they had to lead was one that they should take. And if they had a chance to support someone or connect with someone, they should.


MR. GODIN: Well, the reason I know it's true is because all I do for a living is notice things. And there's one view of the world — call it the Walmart view — that says that what people want, what all people want is as much as stuff as possible for as cheap a price as possible. And if you look at the world through that lens — and there are plenty of people who do — you can come up with a strategy to achieve that. And that's Black Friday sales and that's self-storage units. And that's somebody who's happy to push you to buy something you don't need. Because the object of the game is for them to have more stuff. And that's a world based on scarcity. I don't have enough stuff, how do I get more stuff?

MS. TIPPETT: Right.

MR. GODIN: There's a different view and we see it in so many places, but it doesn't get a lot of press — which is the view not based on scarcity but based on abundance. That in an abundance economy we, the thing we don't have enough of is we don't have enough connection — we're lonely. And we don't have enough time. And if people can offer us connection and meaning and a place where we can be our best selves — yes, we will seek that out. No, it probably doesn't help you build a big profitable public company, but yes, it helps you make a better difference to the community that you've chosen to live in.

MS. TIPPETT: Something that I'm really intrigued by — that I feel you're adding to — is this sense or this knowledge that we all have that we are living in a moment of great flux. We are living in evolutionary times. I read as I was digging into you that Charles Darwin was a really formative figure for you.

MR. GODIN: Yeah. People impart a lot into the notion of evolution — some of which wasn't Darwin's work itself. But what is important here is not only do times change, but those times change, not just our stories about ourselves and our expectations, but they actually are changing our brain. So you know, when the Industrial Revolution came, there were 20 years when basically everyone in Manchester, England, was an alcoholic. Instead of having like coffee carts, they had gin carts that went up and down the streets. Because it was so hard to shift from being a farmer to sitting in a dark room for 12 hours every day doing what you were told. But we evolved, we culturally evolved to be able to handle a New World Order. And so when we talk about evolution as a metaphorical thing where we have memetics and ideas laid on top of this idea of survival of the species and things changing over time, what fascinates me about it is that this bottom-up change in the world is everywhere all the time. So much more common than change that gets put down on us by a dictator or by someone who's putatively in charge.

MS. TIPPETT: Right.

MR. GODIN: And yet we ignore this bottom-up thing when in fact it's the thing we are most likely to be able to touch and change.

That — the Linux operating system, which is on a billion computers around the world, was written by a group of strangers who have never met, who are part of the same tribe. And so the challenge of our future is to say, are we going to connect and amplify positive tribes that want to make things better for all of us? Or are we going to degrade to warring tribes that are willing to bring other groups down just so they can get ahead?


http://www.onbeing.org/program/seth-godin-the-art-of-noticing-and-then-creating/transcript/7080 - http://www.onbeing.org/program/seth-godin-the-art-of-noticing-and-then-creating/transcript/7080

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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 30 January 2015 at 5:42pm
When My Husband Was Fired, I Felt Shame—Then Gratitude

I had grown up identifying joblessness with shame and failure. But here we were, on the other side of the employment equation, and for the first moment in my grown-up life, everything felt … right. We felt surprisingly safe. We felt creative. We were suddenly intellectually engaged. We were stimulated by our environment and by the challenges ahead. We spent the day tromping through the snow, exploring the forests and fields surrounding our new home, oblivious to time.

The coming days were graced with loving visits from family, neighborly gifts of food and winter vegetables, kind notes, offers of short-term work, tips on job leads, and words of encouragement. My conclusion that the community didn’t want us was wrong. What we soon learned, as Bob continued to seek (but not find) secure employment and I finished school and unsuccessfully sought work, was that the community did want us. But the economy didn’t.

That was an important lesson. As a result, what took hold in our souls on November 1, 1999, ultimately became a choice to take a role in a nationwide radical homemaking movement. For the uninitiated, this is a conscious attempt to live an ecologically responsible life and insist that family, community, and the fair treatment of others govern our daily choices. Interestingly, while on this path, we have endured countless accusations that we are at the vanguard of a movement that is causing women and men to “withdraw from society.” As an advocate of radical homemaking, I have been accused of helping others to live a home-centered life, thereby robbing society of intelligent citizens’ talents and education.

Moving forward without the cushion of a steady paycheck was our first step toward rebuilding a new kind of economy in our community.
The outdated assumption in this critique is that home is separate from society. This separation is an invention of the industrial revolution, when men were the first members of the household pushed out to find work. Prior to industrialization, home was the foundation of society, from the time the feudal system began breaking down in Europe onward. Here in the United States, our nation was founded on hearth and home. The self-reliance of American homesteads is what empowered our forefathers to overthrow colonial rule. It is what built our young nation.

Contrary to the criticisms, radical homemakers are not removing themselves from society. They are removing themselves from the modern extractive economy. This is an economy that outpaces the capacity of our planet, that commands the vast majority of people to clamor for jobs that demand well beyond 40 hours of work per week, and that disregards the importance of family and community as a basic human entitlement. It should not be confused with society...

The extractive economy may value public volunteer service, but not the private care of family. It may value certain well-compensated career choices, but not the less glamorous work of tilling soil, pulling weeds, tending livestock, stacking firewood, helping neighbors, or even cooking and cleaning (two activities without which no human society can function). Also, the accusation that radical homemakers are withdrawing from society overlooks the entrepreneurial work that many of us do to create a life-serving economy, whether it is starting an online business, opening up a farmer’s market stall, or bartering skills and resources with neighbors.

All of these small entrepreneurial ventures, coupled with the efforts to restore the family hearth and community life, are the work of radical homemakers. The result will be a society where people are secure; where their locally centered daily lives are buffered from the throes of global economic forces; and where “getting fired” is understood as being “set free.”

http://www.yesmagazine.org/happiness/when-my-husband-was-fired-from-his-job-i-felt-shame-then-gratitude - http://www.yesmagazine.org/happiness/when-my-husband-was-fired-from-his-job-i-felt-shame-then-gratitude

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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 15 February 2015 at 4:00am
Functional Medicine

I just did a blog post where I mentioned this and you’ll see that there’s a functional medicine systems model that I developed. It’s a series of concentric circles. It’s the way that I understand how disease develops. The core of that circle is environment. Another word for it actually that’s fairly new is called the exposome. This is what scientists are using now to refer to the sum total of environmental influences. That’s everything that’s nongenetic. So it could range from diet during our lifetime. But not only that, it’s our mother’s diet during her lifetime and our father’s diet prior to conception, which we now know influences our health. Mother’s diet during pregnancy. It’s early life influences, like whether we were born vaginally or via C-section, whether we were breastfed or fed formula, stress levels of our primary caregivers. Then the status of our gut flora, our exposure to antibiotics and other medications early on in life, that would have influenced the development of our gut flora. Our exercise and physical activity, stress levels, exposure to environmental toxins like mercury amalgams, BPA, volatile organic compounds, pesticides. It’s pretty mind-blowing to think of that, but that’s all encompassed within this term called the exposome, environmental influences.

Then the next ring out from that are genetics and epigenetics. The environmental influences that we’re subjected to or exposed to interact with our unique genome and epigenome, to then express or manifest in certain underlying patterns or mechanisms of disease. So these could be blood sugar dysregulation, autoimmunity, problems with methylation, digestive issues, leaky gut. Then these mechanisms, in turn, express certain diseases. So diabetes, heart disease, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), all the things that Western medicine is kind of focused on. Of course, these diseases and mechanisms then ultimately express themselves as symptoms that we experience as people and patients.

When you understand disease and health from that perspective, then that can serve as the framework for how you go about treating patients in the clinic, and then how I would go about teaching you how to do that in the training program. The first module that we’re hopefully going to launch in the spring, maybe late spring of next year, is going to be all about the exposome or environment. So how to modify all of the modifiable environmental factors to create the healthiest starting place, core fundamental foundation for health. That will be looking at how to change diet, lifestyle, and some of these other influences for a whole variety of health conditions and needs. So for someone who comes to see you and they have Hashimoto’s, they have a number of symptoms, but they’re also training for some competition, how do you address that person? How do you address someone who wants to lose weight, but who tried a low-carb diet, and it’s not working for them? How do you address somebody that has high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and their doctor wants to put them on medication? What are the sorts of things, interventions that you can do for that person to normalize their function without resorting to medication? This will be heavily focused on ancestral, you know, nutrient-dense diets, you can call it Paleo, Paleo-based. But as anyone listening to this knows, I’m not dogmatic about Paleo, it’s more of a starting place and a template for me than anything else. When it comes down to it, this is at least 80% of what you should be doing in any clinical encounter, no matter if you’re a doctor, a nutritionist, osteopath, or naturopath. If you address these core environmental factors in your patients or clients, you’re going to heal 80% of people. Even in a complex patient, you’re going to deal with 80% of the difficulty that they’re experiencing.


http://chriskresser.com/how-to-build-a-career-in-paleo-functional-medicine - http://chriskresser.com/how-to-build-a-career-in-paleo-functional-medicine

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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 16 February 2015 at 10:22am
The Sociology of Dead Children

Experts have put urban violence under the microscope. You might call it the sociology of dead kids.

There's a lot less here than meets the eye, or so it seemed when I read about a new study by researchers at Yale called "Tragic, but not random: The social contagion of nonfatal gunshot injuries." It's an attempt to create categories of likely future shooting victims in Chicago and, thus, determine who among us is most in danger. Well, sure, why not? But in the process, the study, at least as it was reported a few days ago in the Chicago Sun-Times, utterly depersonalized the potential victims, along with the communities in which they lived, reducing them to components in a mathematical formula.

The researchers "sought to go beyond a racial explanation for nonfatal shootings," according to the Sun-Times. "They were trying to explain why a specific young African-American male in a high-crime neighborhood becomes a shooting victim, while another young black man in the same neighborhood doesn't, the study said."

It was all so cold and "scientific," so grandly removed from the hoo-hah of growing up in the big city - of life, death, guns, gangs, poverty and the criminal justice system. As we go about the business of trying to create meaningful lives, it turns out that disinterested mega-forces, as impersonal as gravity, are colluding to determine our fate. Don't worry. Scientists are studying these forces. They'll get them figured out. Meanwhile, go shopping. Or whatever.

Yeah, that was it. What ground against my sensibilities wasn't the science itself, but its transmutation, via the clueless media, into popular culture. The omnipresent assumption of the mainstream media is that you and I are "consumers" - consumers, ultimately, of reality itself - and we live in our culture and our world as spectators rather than participants. This means the reality that's conveyed to us is simplistic and gawk-worthy, rather than complex, multidimensional and evolving. Such news promotes and prolongs the status quo, including the troubles embedded therein, even when it purports to report on solutions to these troubles.

This is our world and it feels, increasingly, like a cul-de-sac without empathy. Shortly after I read about the sociology of dead children, I read about the death of 13-year-old Mohammed Tuaiman, who lived in Yemen. The boy was killed by a U.S. drone attack at the end of January. His death had news value because, a few weeks earlier, he had spoken to Western journalists, according to a story at Common Dreams, "about his pervasive fear of the U.S. drones flying overhead. .

"Mohammed's father and one of his brothers were killed by a U.S. drone in 2011, which sparked the young boy's fear of what he called the U.S. 'death machines.' Subsequently interviewed by the Guardian, and given a camera in order to document his life in war-torn Yemen, Mohammed spoke earnestly and openly about the dangers and fears that plagued his life."

The connection between the two stories is intuitive, but not random. The level of thinking in each is the same: impersonal control, maintenance of security from a distance. How long before the "manpower-strapped" Chicago Police Department begins employing drone technology to keep its eye on the city's scientifically determined at-risk young people?

Missing from the Sun-Times story was any mention of community, at least as something organic and protective. Also missing were words such as valuing, listening, respecting - without which, my God, security for anyone is a travesty. Missing also was any mention of militarized police or our national obsession with war. These are the forces of dehumanization and they put all of us at risk.




http://www.iviews.com/Articles/articles.asp?ref=IV1502-6016 - http://www.iviews.com/Articles/articles.asp?ref=IV1502-6016

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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 17 February 2015 at 10:20am


"When everything is subject to money, then the scarcity of money makes everything scarce, including the basis of human life and happiness. Such is the life of the slave—one whose actions are compelled by threat to survival. Perhaps the deepest indication of our slavery is the monetization of time."



“When we must pay the true price for the depletion of nature’s gifts, materials will become more precious to us, and economic logic will reinforce, and not contradict, our heart’s desire to treat the world with reverence and, when we receive nature’s gifts, to use them well.”


“The present convergence of crises––in money, energy, education, health, water, soil, climate, politics, the environment, and more––is a birth crisis, expelling us from the old world into a new.”

“The financial crisis we are facing today arises from the fact that there is almost no more social, cultural, natural, and spiritual capital left to convert into money.”


“The things we need most are the things we have become most afraid of, such as adventure, intimacy, and authentic communication. We avert our eyes and stick to comfortable topics. We hold it as a virtue to be private, to be discreet, so that no one sees our dirty laundry. We are uncomfortable with intimacy and connection, which are among the greatest of our unmet needs today. To be truly seen and heard, to be truly known, is a deep human need. Our hunger for it is so omnipresent, so much apart of our life experience, that we no more know what it is missing than a fish knows it is wet. We need more intimacy than nearly anyone considers normal. Always hungry for it, we seek solace and sustenance in the closest available substitutes: television, shopping, pornography, conspicuous consumption — anything to ease the hurt, to feel connected, or to project an image by which we might be seen or known, or at least see and know ourselves.”

“The American Dream betrayed even those who achieved it, lonely in their overtime careers and their McMansions, narcotized to the ongoing ruination of nature and culture but aching because of it, endlessly consuming and accumulating to quell the insistent voice: “I wasn’t put here on Earth to sell a product.” “I wasn’t put here on Earth to increase market share.” “I wasn’t put here on Earth to make numbers grow.”

We protest not only at our exclusion from the American Dream; we protest at its bleakness. If it cannot include everyone on Earth, every ecosystem and bioregion, every people and culture in its richness; if the wealth of one must be the debt of another; if it entails sweatshops and underclasses and fracking and all the rest of the ugliness our system has created, then we want none of it.

No one deserves to live in a world built upon the degradation of human beings, forests, waters, and the rest of our living planet. Speaking to our brethren on Wall Street: No one deserves to spend their lives playing with numbers while the world burns.”


“Addiction, self-sabotage, procrastination, laziness, rage, chronic fatigue, and depression are all ways that we withhold our full participation in the program of life we are offered. When the conscious mind cannot find a reason to say no, the unconscious says no in its own way.”

“The state of interbeing is a vulnerable state. It is the vulnerability of the naive altruist, of the trusting lover, of the unguarded sharer. To enter it, one must leave behind the seeming shelter of a control-based life, protected by walls of cynicism, judgment, and blame.”

“Ultimately, work on self is inseperable from work in the world. Each mirrors the other; each is a vehicle for the other. When we change ourselves, our values and actions change as well. When we do work in the world, internal issues arise that we must face or be rendered ineffective.”


“Contemporaneous with the financial crisis we have an ecological crisis and a health crisis. They are intimately interlinked. We cannot convert much more of the earth into money, or much more of our health into money, before the basis of life itself is threatened.”
“What does economic growth actually mean? It means more consumption – and consumption of a specific kind: more consumption of goods and services that are exchanged for money. That means that if people stop caring for their own children and instead pay for childcare, the economy grows. The same if people stop cooking for themselves and purchase restaurant takeaways instead.

Economists say this is a good thing. After all, you wouldn’t pay for childcare or takeaway food if it weren’t of benefit to you, right? So, the more things people are paying for, the more benefits are being had. Besides, it is more efficient for one daycare centre to handle 30 children than for each family to do it themselves. That’s why we are all so much richer, happier and less busy than we were a generation ago. Right?”

“The world is on fire! Why am I sitting in front of my computer? It is because I don’t have a fire extinguisher for the world, and there isn’t a global 911 to call.”


“It is quite normal to fear what one most desires. We desire to transcend the Story of the World that has come to enslave us, that indeed is killing the planet. We fear what the end of that story will bring: the demise of much that is familiar.

Fear it or not, it is happening already.”

“When you hear the phrase “rescue the financial system,” translate it in your mind into “keep the debts on the books.” They are trying to find a way for you (and debtor nations too) to keep paying and for the debt to keep growing.”


“Is it too much to ask, to live in a world where our human gifts go toward the benefit of all? Where our daily activities contribute to the healing of the biosphere and the well-being of other people?”

― Charles Eisenstein, The More Beautiful World Our Hearts Know Is Possible









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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 20 February 2015 at 3:15pm
Occupy Your Heart– The Revolution Is Love

Love is the felt experience of connection to another being. An economist says ‘more for you is less for me.’ But the lover knows that more of you is more for me too. If you love somebody their happiness is your happiness. Their pain is your pain. Your sense of self expands to include other beings. This shift of consciousness is universal in everybody, 99% and 1%. ~ Charles Eisenstein





https://vimeo.com/32156441 - https://vimeo.com/32156441

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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 23 February 2015 at 3:10pm
Five ways that people frame climate change debates


Words are powerful. The word ‘consumer’, for example, isn’t just an innocent part of the language: it triggers a frame – a set of assumptions about what you should think and how you should behave.

Inside this frame, your job as a consumer is simply to choose between different options available to you for consumption. You might not realise that you have no say over what choices were put on the menu: that’s outside the frame.

Framing happens in all sorts of contexts, from obesity to economic growth. Spotting frames is an invaluable skill because noticing a frame opens the door to looking outside it, where new and innovative ideas may be lurking.


In the case of climate change, framing abounds as CEOs, politicians, NGOs and many more besides vie to frame the debate to suit their agendas - not always with the best environmental outcomes in mind. But even when their intentions are good, they can remain unknowingly trapped in frames.

With this in mind, here are five frames to help build your framespotting skills:

http://www.theguardian.com/sustainable-business/2015/feb/23/five-ways-that-people-frame-climate-change-debates - http://www.theguardian.com/sustainable-business/2015/feb/23/five-ways-that-people-frame-climate-change-debates

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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 24 February 2015 at 4:26pm


The Great Turning is a name for the essential adventure of our time: the shift from the industrial growth society to a life-sustaining civilization.

The ecological and social crises we face are inflamed by an economic system dependent on accelerating growth. This self-destructing political economy sets its goals and measures its performance in terms of ever-increasing corporate profits--in other words by how fast materials can be extracted from Earth and turned into consumer products, weapons, and waste.

General systems theory, emerging from the life sciences, brings fresh evidence to confirm ancient, indigenous teachings: the Earth is alive, mind is pervasive, all beings are our relations. This realization changes everything. It changes our perceptions of who we are and what we need, and how we can trustfully act together for a decent, noble future.

“The most remarkable feature of this historical moment on Earth is not that we are on the way to destroying the world—we’ve actually been on the way for quite a while. It is that we are beginning to wake up, as from a millennia-long sleep, to a whole new relationship to our world, to ourselves and each other.”

The truth is that all aspects of the current crisis reflect the same mistake, setting ourselves apart and using others for our gain

There are the holding actions, the changing actions, and the vision of the future — what we want to see happen for the Earth. All are essential.



Of course, even when you see the world as a trap and posit a fundamental separation between liberation of self and transformation of society, you can still feel a compassionate impulse to help its suffering beings. In that case you tend to view the personal and the political in a sequential fashion. "I'll get enlightened first, and then I'll engage in social action." Those who are not engaged in spiritual pursuits put it differently: "I'll get my head straight first, I'll get psychoanalyzed, I'll overcome my inhibitions or neuroses or my hang-ups (whatever description you give to samsara) and then I'll wade into the fray." Presupposing that world and self are essentially separate, they imagine they can heal one before healing the other. This stance conveys the impression that human consciousness inhabits some haven, or locker-room, independent of the collective situation -- and then trots onto the playing field when it is geared up and ready.

It is my experience that the world itself has a role to play in our liberation. Its very pressures, pains, and risks can wake us up -- release us from the bonds of ego and guide us home to our vast, true nature. For some of us, our love of the world is so passionate that we cannot ask it to wait until we are enlightened.

"If the world is to be healed through human efforts, I am convinced it will be by ordinary people, people whose love for this life is even greater than their fear. People who can open to the web of life that called us into being".


― Joanna Macy







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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 25 February 2015 at 4:36pm
Liking Is for Cowards. Go for What Hurts

When I was in college, and for many years after, I liked the natural world. Didn’t love it, but definitely liked it. It can be very pretty, nature. And since I was looking for things to find wrong with the world, I naturally gravitated to environmentalism, because there were certainly plenty of things wrong with the environment. And the more I looked at what was wrong — an exploding world population, exploding levels of resource consumption, rising global temperatures, the trashing of the oceans, the logging of our last old-growth forests — the angrier I became.

Finally, in the mid-1990s, I made a conscious decision to stop worrying about the environment. There was nothing meaningful that I personally could do to save the planet, and I wanted to get on with devoting myself to the things I loved. […]

But then a funny thing happened to me. It’s a long story, but basically I fell in love with birds. I did this not without significant resistance, because it’s very uncool to be a birdwatcher, because anything that betrays real passion is by definition uncool. But little by little, in spite of myself, I developed this passion, and although one-half of a passion is obsession, the other half is love.

And so, yes, I kept a meticulous list of the birds I’d seen, and, yes, I went to inordinate lengths to see new species. But, no less important, whenever I looked at a bird, any bird, even a pigeon or a robin, I could feel my heart overflow with love. […]

And here’s where a curious paradox emerged. My anger and pain and despair about the planet were only increased by my concern for wild birds, and yet, as I began to get involved in bird conservation and learned more about the many threats that birds face, it became easier, not harder, to live with my anger and despair and pain.

How does this happen? I think, for one thing, that my love of birds became a portal to an important, less self-centered part of myself that I’d never even known existed. Instead of continuing to drift forward through my life as a global citizen, liking and disliking and withholding my commitment for some later date, I was forced to confront a self that I had to either straight-up accept or flat-out reject.

Which is what love will do to a person. Because the fundamental fact about all of us is that we’re alive for a while but will die before long. This fact is the real root cause of all our anger and pain and despair. And you can either run from this fact or, by way of love, you can embrace it.

When you stay in your room and rage or sneer or shrug your shoulders, as I did for many years, the world and its problems are impossibly daunting. But when you go out and put yourself in real relation to real people, or even just real animals, there’s a very real danger that you might love some of them.

And who knows what might happen to you then?

--Jonathan Franzen

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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 28 February 2015 at 7:35am
We are the Ones We've Been Waiting For



You have been telling people that this is the Eleventh Hour, now you must go back and tell the people that this is the Hour. And there are things to be considered…

Where are you living?
What are you doing?
What are your relationships?
Are you in right relation?
Where is your water?

Know your garden.
It is time to speak your truth.
Create your community.
Be good to each other.
And do not look outside yourself for your leader.

Then he clasped his hands together, smiled, and said, “This could be a good time! There is a river flowing now very fast. It is so great and swift that there are those who will be afraid. They will try to hold on to the shore. They will feel they are being torn apart and will suffer greatly. Know the river has its destination. The elders say we must let go of the shore, push off into the middle of the river, keep our eyes open, and our heads above the water.

And I say, see who is in there with you and celebrate. At this time in history, we are to take nothing personally, least of all ourselves. For the moment that we do, our spiritual growth and journey come to a halt.

The time of the one wolf is over. Gather yourselves! Banish the word ’struggle’ from your attitude and your vocabulary. All that we do now must be done in a sacred manner and in celebration.

We are the ones we’ve been waiting for.

Hopi Elders' Prophecy

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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 01 March 2015 at 6:39am
Business Lessons from A Quiet Gardener


The people who know me best know that at heart I am just a quiet gardener. My garden has probably taught me the most about how things grow - and thrive in a vibrant and sustainable manner. These lessons have shaped my approach to encouraging responsible growth in business and to the ways I apply my intention, attention and energy.

A gardener sees the world as a system of interdependent parts - where healthy, sustaining relationships are essential to the vitality of the whole. "A real gardener is not a person who cultivates flowers, but a person who cultivates the soil." In business this has translated for me into the importance of developing agreements and partnerships where vision and values, purpose and intent are explicitly articulated, considered and aligned among all stakeholders of an enterprise - customers, employees, suppliers, shareholders, and the broader community and natural environment.

The garden has taught me about patience and persistence and the ethical principles of generosity and reciprocity. It has illuminated the importance of appreciating the cycles of life and decay. For the gardener, composting is a transformative act - whereby last season's clippings (or failures) can become next year's source of vigor.

I've learned that it's not just what you plant, but how you plant it that brings long - term rewards in life, work and the garden. Gardeners know that once strong roots are established, growth is often exponential rather than linear.

Also gardening, like business, is inherently a local activity, set within an ever-changing and unpredictable global climate. Showing up in person, shovel - and humility in hand is essential.

Gardeners, like entrepreneurs, are obsessed with latent potential - and can be known to be pathologically optimistic. We can vividly imagine the bloom and the scent of the rose even in deepest of winter. As the American naturalist Henry David Thoreau once wrote: "I have great faith in a seed. Convince me that you have a seed there, and I am prepared to expect wonders."

In essence, the gardener's work is a life of care. We cultivate abundance from scarce resources. We nurture, encourage, fertilize - and prune when necessary - while being respectful of the true and wild nature of all things. We know that creating enduring value requires vision, passion, hard work and the spirit of others.

I am just coming to understand this work of business gardening - and investing in keeping people healthy - as an act of universal responsibility. His Holiness Dalai Lama reminds me: "Each of us must learn to work not just for one self, one's own family or one's nation, but for the benefit of all humankind. Universal responsibility is the key to human survival. It is the best foundation for world peace."


-William Rosenzweig, from his Acceptance Speech for "Oslo Business for Peace Award"


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 02 March 2015 at 3:51pm
Conscious Simplicity


Here are three major ways that I see the idea of simplicity presented in today’s popular media:

1) Crude or Regressive Simplicity: The mainstream media often shows simplicity as a path of regress instead of progress. Simplicity is frequently presented as anti-­‐technology and anti-­‐innovation, a backward-­‐looking way of life that seeks a romantic return to a bygone era. A regressive simplicity is often portrayed as a utopian, back-­‐to-­‐nature movement with families leaving the stresses of an urban life in favor of living in the woods, or on a farm, or in a recreational vehicle, or on a boat. This is a stereotypical view of a crudely simple lifestyle -- a throwback to an earlier time and more primitive condition -- with no indoor toilet, no phone, no computer, no television, and no car. No thanks! Seen in this way, simplicity is a cartoon lifestyle that seems naive, disconnected, and irrelevant -- an approach to living that can be easily dismissed as impractical and unworkable. Regarding simplicity as regressive and primitive makes it easier to embrace a "business as usual" approach to living in the world.

2) Cosmetic or Superficial Simplicity: In recent years, a different view of simplicity has begun to appear -- a cosmetic simplicity that attempts to cover over deep defects in our modern ways of living by giving the appearance of meaningful change. Shallow simplicity assumes that green technologies -- such as fuel­‐efficient cars, fluorescent light bulbs, and recycling -- will fix our problems, give us breathing room, and allow us to continue pretty much as we have in the past without requiring that we make fundamental changes in how we live and work. Cosmetic simplicity puts green lipstick on our unsustainable lives to give them the outward appearance of health and happiness. A superficial simplicity gives a false sense of security by implying that small measures will solve great difficulties and allow us to continue along our current path of growth for decades or more.

3) Deep or Conscious Simplicity: Occasionally presented in the mass media and poorly understood by the general public is a conscious simplicity that represents a deep, graceful, and sophisticated transformation in our ways of living -- the work we do, the transportation we use, the homes and neighborhoods in which we live, the food we eat, the clothes we wear, and much more. A sophisticated and graceful simplicity seeks to heal our relationship with the Earth, with one another, and with the sacred universe. Conscious simplicity is not simple. This is a life way that is growing and flowering with a garden of expressions. Deep simplicity fits aesthetically and sustainably into the real world of the twenty-­first century.

Today's world requires far more than crude or cosmetic changes in our manner of living. If we are to maintain the integrity of the Earth as a living system, we require deep and creative changes in our overall levels and patterns of living and consuming. Simplicity is not an alternative lifestyle for a marginal few, but rather a creative choice for the mainstream majority. What does a life of conscious simplicity look like? There is no cookbook we can turn to with easy recipes for the simple life. The world is moving into new territory and we are all inventing as we go.

Duane Elgin - excerpt from Voluntary Simplicity

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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 04 March 2015 at 6:09am
Living at the Right Speed

Carl Honore



Fast and Slow do more than just describe a rate of change. They are shorthand for ways of being, or philosophies of life. Fast is busy, controlling, aggressive, hurried, analytical, stressed, superficial, impatient, active, quantity-over-quality. Slow is the opposite: calm, careful, receptive, still, intuitive, unhurried, patient, reflective, quality-over-quantity. It is about making real and meaningful connections -- with people, culture, work, food, everything. The paradox is that Slow does not always mean slow. As we shall see, performing a task in a Slow manner often yields faster results. It is also possible to do things quickly while maintaining a Slow frame of mind. A century after Rudyard Kipling wrote of keeping your head while all about you are losing theirs, people are learning how to keep their cool, how to remain Slow inside, even as they rush to meet a deadline at work, or to get the children to school on time.

Despite what some critics say, the Slow movement is not about doing everything at a snail's pace. Nor is it a Luddite attempt to drag the whole world back to some pre-industrial utopia. On the contrary, the movement is made up of people like you and me, people who want to live better in a fast-paced, modern environment. That is why the Slow philosophy can be summed up in a single word: balance. Be fast when it makes sense to be fast, and be slow when slowness is called for. Seek to live at what musicians call the tempo giusto -- the right speed.



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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 05 March 2015 at 1:44am
Radiating Photons of Goodwill



Every now and then, I'll meet an escapee, someone who has broken free of self-centeredness and lit out for the territory of compassion. You've met them, too, those people who seem to emit a steady stream of, for want of a better word, love-vibes. As soon as you come within range, you feel embraced, accepted for who you are. For those of us who suspect that you rarely get something for nothing, such geniality can be discomfiting. Yet it feels so good to be around them. They stand there, radiating photons of goodwill, and despite yourself you beam back, and the world, in a twinkling, changes.

I appreciate these compassion-mongers, even marvel at them. But I’ve rarely thought that I could be one of them. Sure, I’ve tried to live a benign life, putting my shoulder to the wheel for peace, justice, and Mother Earth. Like most people, I adore my off spring, even when they drive me crazy; love my parents, despite the corkscrew of childhood; dote on my siblings (though there is that scrapbook of old slights); and treasure my friends (even if they sometimes let me down). Conventional wisdom wouldn't fault me for saving the best stuff for my nearest and dearest and giving the rest of humanity the left overs.

Thus it is, say the sages, that the harvest of kindness -- of kindredness --
is winnowed down to a precious few grains. For at the center of all spiritual traditions is the beacon of a truly radical proposal: Open your heart to everybody. Everybody.

Is this even possible?

Nelson Mandela once remarked that he befriended his jailers, those grim, khaki-clad overseers of his decades of hard labor in a limestone quarry, by "exploiting their good qualities." Asked if he believed all people were kind at their core, he responded, "There is no doubt whatsoever, provided you are able to arouse their inherent goodness." If that sounds like wishful thinking, well, he actually did it.

Marc Ian Barasch, in The Compassionate Life



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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 08 March 2015 at 6:11pm



How, I am asking, can women improve themselves by submitting to the same specialization, degradation, trivialization, and tyrannization of work that men have submitted to? And that question is made legitimate by another: How have men improved themselves by submitting to it? The answer is that men have not, and women cannot, improve themselves by submitting to it.

Women have complained, justly, about the behavior of “macho” men. But despite their he-man pretensions and their captivation by masculine heroes of sports, war, and the Old West, most men are now entirely accustomed to obeying and currying the favor of their bosses. Because of this, of course, they hate their jobs—they mutter, “Thank God it’s Friday” and “Pretty good for Monday”— but they do as they are told. They are more compliant than most housewives have been. Their characters combine feudal submissiveness with modern helplessness. They have accepted almost without protest, and often with consumptive relief, their dispossession of any usable property and, with that, their loss of economic independence and their consequent subordination to bosses. They have submitted to the destruction of the household economy and thus of the household, to the loss of home employment and self-employment, to the disintegration of their families and communities, to the desecration and pillage of their country, and they have continued abjectly to believe, obey, and vote for the people who have most eagerly abetted this ruin and who have most profited from it. These men, moreover, are helpless to do anything for themselves or anyone else without money, and so for money they do whatever they are told. They know that their ability to be useful is precisely defined by their willingness to be somebody else’s tool. Is it any wonder that they talk tough and worship athletes and cowboys? Is it any wonder that some of them are violent?

It is clear that women cannot justly be excluded from the daily fracas by which the industrial economy divides the spoils of society and nature, but their inclusion is a poor justice and no reason for applause. The enterprise is as devastating with women in it as it was before. There is no sign that women are exerting a “civilizing influence” upon it. To have an equal part in our juggernaut of national vandalism is to be a vandal. To call this vandalism “liberation” is to prolong, and even ratify, a dangerous confusion that was once principally masculine.

A broader, deeper criticism is necessary. The problem is not just the exploitation of women by men. A greater problem is that women and men alike are consenting to an economy that exploits women and men and everything else.

Another decent possibility my critics implicitly deny is that of work as a gift. Not one of them supposed that my wife may be a consulting engineer who helps me in her spare time out of the goodness of her heart; instead they suppose that she is “a household drudge.” But what appears to infuriate them the most is their supposition that she works for nothing. They assume—and this is the orthodox assumption of the industrial economy—that the only help worth giving is not given at all, but sold. Love, friendship, neighborliness, compassion, duty—what are they? We are realists. We will be most happy to receive your check.


FEMINISM, THE BODY, AND THE MACHINE-Wendell Berry




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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 09 March 2015 at 3:20am
Mis estimados,
Do not lose heart. We were made for these times.-Clarissa Pinkola Estés



We all have a heritage and history of being gutted, and yet remember this especially … we have also, of necessity, perfected the knack of resurrection.

Over and over again we have been the living proof that that which has been exiled, lost, or foundered – can be restored to life again. This is as true and sturdy a prognosis for the destroyed worlds around us as it was for our own once mortally wounded selves.

…Though we are not invulnerable, our visibility supports us to laugh in the face of cynics who say “fat chance,” and “management before mercy,” and other evidences of complete absence of soul sense. This, and our having been ‘to Hell and back’ on at least one momentous occasion, makes us seasoned vessels for certain. Even if you do not feel that you are, you are.

Even if your puny little ego wants to contest the enormity of your soul, the smaller self can never for long subordinate the larger Self. In matters of death and rebirth, you have surpassed the benchmarks many times. Believe the evidence of any one of your past testings and trials. Here it is: Are you still standing? The answer is, Yes! (And no adverbs like “barely” are allowed here). If you are still standing, ragged flags or no, you are able. Thus, you have passed the bar. And even raised it. You are seaworthy.

…In any dark time, there is a tendency to veer toward fainting over how much is wrong or unmended in the world. Do not focus on that. Do not make yourself ill with overwhelm. There is a tendency too to fall into being weakened by perseverating on what is outside your reach, by what cannot yet be. Do not focus there. That is spending the wind without raising the sails.

We are needed, that is all we can know. And though we meet resistance, we more so will meet great souls who will hail us, love us and guide us, and we will know them when they appear. Didn’t you say you were a believer? Didn’t you say you pledged to listen to a voice greater? Didn’t you ask for grace? Don’t you remember that to be in grace means to submit to the Voice greater? You have all the resource you need to ride any wave, to surface from any trough.



…In the language of aviators and sailors, ours is to sail forward now, all balls out. Understand the paradox: If you study the physics of a waterspout, you will see that the outer vortex whirls far more rapidly than the inner one. To calm the storm means to quiet the outer layer, to cause it, by whatever countervailing means, to swirl much less, to more evenly match the velocity of the inner, far less volatile core – till whatever has been lifted into such a vicious funnel falls back to Earth, lays down, is peaceable again.

One of the most important steps you can take to help calm the storm is to not allow yourself to be taken in a flurry of overwrought emotion or despair – thereby accidentally contributing to the swale and the swirl. Ours is not the task of fixing the entire world all at once, but of stretching out to mend the part of the world that is within our reach.

Any small, calm thing that one soul can do to help another soul, to assist some portion of this poor suffering world, will help immensely.

It is not given to us to know which acts or by whom, will cause the critical mass to tip toward an enduring good. What is needed for dramatic change is an accumulation of acts – adding, adding to, adding more, continuing. We know that it does not take “everyone on Earth” to bring justice and peace, but only a small, determined group who will not give up during the first, second, or hundredth gale.

…One of the most calming and powerful actions you can do to intervene in a stormy world is to stand up and show your soul. Soul on deck shines like gold in dark times.

The light of the soul throws sparks, can send up flares, builds signal fires … causes proper matters to catch fire. To display the lantern of soul in shadowy times like these – to be fierce and to show mercy toward others, both — are acts of immense bravery and greatest necessity. Struggling souls catch light from other souls who are fully lit and willing to show it. If you would help to calm the tumult, this is one of the strongest things you can do.

…There will always be times in the midst of “success right around the corner, but as yet still unseen” when you feel discouraged. I too have felt despair many times in my life, but I do not keep a chair for it; I will not entertain it. It is not allowed to eat from my plate.

The reason is this: In my uttermost bones I know something, as do you. It is that there can be no despair when you remember why you came to Earth, who you serve, and who sent you here. The good words we say and the good deeds we do are not ours: They are the words and deeds of the One who brought us here.

In that spirit, I hope you will write this on your wall: When a great ship is in harbor and moored, it is safe, there can be no doubt. But … that is not what great ships are built for.

…This comes with much love and prayer that you remember who you came from, and why you came to this beautiful, needful Earth.




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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 13 March 2015 at 3:12am
Food Choices

The common reality of the current state of our halal meat is not a pretty picture. Industrialized farming practices do not follow Islamic guidelines. Often times we fail to draw a distinction between zabiha and halal. The two are not synonymous. Halal in its entire depth covers more ground than hand slaughtering in the name of Allah. It is also the manner in which an animal lives. A natural life in natural conditions, with a natural diet. It's also pertinent that the animal doesn't see another animal slaughtered. If these requirements are not met, how can we be certain the meat we are eating is halal?

Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) was known for his simple and often meatless diet. With colonization came the correlation between meat and wealth. Along came the factory farming industry with its policies that make life challenging for small farmers and impossible for voiceless animals.

Capitalism is a profit driven concept that puts our ethical compass on the back burner. It's a system that will try to mislead us by using deceptive terms that are shrouded in mystery like free-range, which doesn't mean free at all. However, we can do our best to take a stand against injustice.

With every dollar you spend, you vote for what manufacturing policies you support. Grocery shopping is when our food choices are entirely in our hands. This is when I choose to be as vegan and cruelty free as possible because my Islam teaches me respect for animals. I cannot and will not finance an industry with my purchases that perpetuates cruelty. We don't have to fund and condone abhorrent farming practices. We have an abundance of choices here. Let's make the right ones.


"Confessions of a Muslim Vegetarian" - Zehra Abbas


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 15 March 2015 at 5:01pm
Replace the Gospel of Money: An Interview With David Korten

What if we measured wealth in terms of life, and how well we serve it?


Paton: You’re saying it’s the traditional development model, or transnational capitalism, that damages Earth as a living community, including not just humans but all life forms. Yet we all depend on money, on the market economy. Do you really think we can just stop that dependence?

Korten: We will still use money and markets, but strip away Wall Street’s control of money’s creation and allocation. There was a time in the United States when most of our financial institutions were local. Which essentially meant that local communities were able to create their own credit, or their own money, in response to their own needs. We still depended on banks, but it was a much more democratic process.

Paton: Like George Bailey’s building and loan in It’s a Wonderful Life.

Korten: Exactly. If more of our money circulated in our communities rather than the Wall Street casino, it would facilitate people organizing locally to meet more of their economic needs with local resources. Control of money is the ultimate mechanism of social control in a society in which most every person depends on money for the basic means of living—food, water, shelter, heat, transportation, entertainment. This leads us into the voluntary simplicity movement: The less I’m dependent on money, the freer I am. Realize that the only legitimate purpose of the economy is to serve life, is to serve us as living beings making our living in co-productive partnership with living Earth.


Paton: Most of us respond to a 10-dollar bill. Or a bonus at work. Or a new car.

Korten: But we respond to that because we accept the “Sacred Money and Markets” story that money is wealth, a fabrication that is literally killing us.

Paton: So you say that our choice is between working with Earth and working against her?

Korten: It comes back to this: Are we a part of nature? Or apart from nature?

Paton: Why do you insist we adopt this “Living Earth” story?

Korten: Because we humans live by stories.

Paton: And that means…?

Korten: It means that to organize as ordered societies, we need a shared framework—basic values and assumptions—so that when I relate to you, I’ve got some idea of how you’re going to respond, because we share our basic story.

Paton: Do we have a choice?

Korten: Yeah, change or die. Quite literally. You really can’t grasp the new story—as a society—and continue to live the way we live. First you begin to move toward more voluntary simplicity, which is, literally, reducing your dependence on money. You start doing more things yourself. You pay much more attention to your relationships, to the gift economy. You perhaps get a deeper sense of being part of and a contributor to a living universe evolving toward ever greater complexity, beauty, awareness, and possibility. What would that mean for society, and then what does it mean for how I live? What is my contribution to the change society needs? I have a responsibility to be part of this change—which begins by changing the story.


http://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/together-with-earth/replace-the-gospel-of-money-interview-with-david-korten - http://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/together-with-earth/replace-the-gospel-of-money-interview-with-david-korten

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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 16 March 2015 at 7:27pm
The Great Tragedy of Speed


Speed in work has compensations. Speed gets noticed. Speed is praised by others. Speed is self-important. Speed absolves us. Speed means we don't really belong to any particular thing or person we are visiting and thus appears to elevate us above the ground of our labors.

When it becomes all-consuming, speed is the ultimate defense, the antidote to stopping and really looking. If we really saw what we were doing and who we had become, we feel we might not survive the stopping and the accompanying self-appraisal. So we don't stop, and the faster we go, the harder it becomes to stop. We keep moving on whenever any form of true commitment seems to surface.

Speed is also warning, a throbbing, insistent indicator that some cliff edge or other is very near, a sure diagnostic sign that we are living someone else's life and doing someone else's work. But speed saves us the pain of all that stopping; speed can be such a balm, a saving grace, a way we tell ourselves, in unconscious ways, that we are really not participating.

"The great tragedy of speed as an answer to the complexities and responsibilities of existence is that very soon we cannot recognize anything or anyone who is not traveling at the same velocity as we are. We see only those moving in the same whirling orbit and only those moving with the same urgency. Soon we begin to suffer a form of amnesia, caused by the blurred vision of velocity itself, where those germane to our humanity are dropped from our minds one by one. We start to lose sight of any colleagues who are moving at a slower pace, and we start to lose sight of the bigger, slower cycles that underlie our work. We especially lose sight of the big, unfolding wave form passing through our lives that is indicative of our central character.

On the personal side, as slaves to speed, we start to lose sight of family members, especially children, or those who are ill or infirm, who are not flying through the world as quickly and determinedly as we are. Just as seriously, we begin to leave behind the parts of our own selves that limp a little, the vulnerabilities that actually give us color and character. We forget that our sanity is dependent on a relationship with longer, more patient cycles extending beyond the urgencies and madness of the office."

-David Whyte



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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 19 March 2015 at 5:10pm

KEEPING QUIET

Now we will count to twelve
and we will all keep still.

For once on the face of the earth
let's not speak in any language,
let's stop for one second,
and not move our arms so much.

It would be an exotic moment
without rush, without engines,
we would all be together
in a sudden strangeness.

Fishermen in the cold sea
would not harm whales
and the man gathering salt
would look at his hurt hands.

Those who prepare green wars,
wars with gas, wars with fire,
victory with no survivors,
would put on clean clothes
and walk about with their brothers
in the shade, doing nothing.

What I want should not be confused
with total inactivity.
Life is what it is about;
I want no truck with death.

If we were not so single-minded
about keeping our lives moving,
and for once could do nothing,
perhaps a huge silence
might interrupt this sadness
of never understanding ourselves
and of threatening ourselves with death.
Perhaps the earth can teach us
as when everything seems dead
and later proves to be alive.

Now I'll count up to twelve
and you keep quiet and I will go.

Pablo Neruda

Extravagaria (translated by Alastair Reid)


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 22 March 2015 at 6:50pm
WELCOME TO THE FUTURE ECONOMY

To better weigh the progress of innovative business models in the new economy, the E3 Network—a national network of economists focused on equity and environment—deployed researchers around the country to separate hype from reality. Armed with an analytical framework developed by our steering committee, these researchers looked deeply into how new business models function, what their impacts are, how scaleable they are, and how replicable they are.

http://futureecon.org/future-economy/welcome-future-economy - futureecon.org/future-economy/welcome-future-economy


FIGHTING POVERTY WITH PARKS



“When I first came here eleven years ago, there were a lot of gangs,” says Peraza, stocky and upbeat and in his mid-30s. “People wouldn’t even bother buying bikes—they felt like it was throwing money in the garbage because they were always getting stolen.” Peraza eventually convinced Hacienda to build a safe bike storage room, and he started a bike club.

Then, in 2010 he landed a job planting trees with Verde, a Hacienda spin-off focused on creating jobs and greening the neighborhood. Before long he was working with a coalition of neighborhood groups, including Verde and Hacienda, in an ambitious venture that promises to transform the neighborhood’s identity: the conversion of a twenty-five-acre former gravel pit and construction waste dump into a new public park.

The park is the most visible example of an emerging economy built around green assets and citizen empowerment in Cully, a case I analyzed in depth for the Future Economy Initiative.

In Verde’s hands, sustainability becomes a neighborhood-wide anti-poverty strategy, addressing unemployment, displacement, health, and access to services and neighborhood amenities simultaneously...


http://futureecon.org/future-economy/fighting-poverty-with-parks - futureecon.org/future-economy/fighting-poverty-with-parks

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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 24 March 2015 at 6:23pm
Gracy Olmstead: Jayber Crow is deeply rooted in his community. He’s opposed to war and much of the so-called “progress” that goes on around him. Would you call Jayber Crow a conservative?

Wendell Berry: It never occurred to me to think of Jayber as a “conservative.” I don’t think that would have helped, though he is instinctively and in principle a conserver. His membership is not in a party or a public movement, but in Port William. He is a man of unsteady faith in love with a place, a perishing little town, a community, a woman—with all that is redemptive and good—struggling to be worthy. I didn’t (and don’t) think of him as a “liberal” either.

Jayber to me is Jayber unclassified.

The same for Edmund Burke, whose writings and speeches I have read eagerly and at considerable length.

I don’t read him to be confirmed in a party allegiance. I read him for his steadfast affirmation of qualities I see as, in a high sense, human. I read him for his decency, the luster of his intelligence and character, his patience and endurance in thinking, his willingness to take a principled stand, the happiness of his prose.

He was a peacemaker, a lover of “order and beauty,” of “the amiable and conciliatory virtues of lenity, moderation, and tenderness.” As a man in politics should do, he preferred reason to the passions. He thought that “the separation of fame and virtue is an harsh divorce.” He said, “I do not like to see anything destroyed…” He said that a person “has a right to a fair portion of all which society, with all its combinations of skill and force, can do in his favor.” He said, “The poorest being that crawls on earth, contending to save itself from injustice and oppression, is an object respectable in the eyes of God and man.”

A useful exercise for an American is to ask which of our holders of office has ever spoken publicly in favor of beauty or the “virtue” of tenderness.


GO: You once wrote of the Gulf War, “But we know that this was descended from a history of war and that it evokes the fear of other wars that may descend from it.” Is war with ISIS also part of this chain—descended from the Iraq War, in particular? How do we stop this cycle?

WB: It does seem that there are lineages of war and that wars are the causes of wars. And it seems unlikely that wars cause peace. Wars cause victory and defeat, equivocal terms because in wars both sides lose much that they would rather keep, and they cause exhaustion. But victory, defeat, loss, and exhaustion don’t define peace. It is certain that peace does not cause war. Wars, moreover, tend not to end. Damage from our Civil War continues today. We are still under the influence of World War II. We still suffer the effects of the succession of wars that have followed.

But I don’t believe we can hope to make sense of our modern wars until we have acknowledged that war is good for business. The industrialization of war has made it far worse than before. And weapons, ammunition, explosives, the vehicles of battle—like throwaway bottles, made to be destroyed and expensively replaced—are ideal products of industrialism.

Peace assuredly would pay even larger dividends, but to the wrong people. It is not at all clear how you could make a billion dollars by being peaceable. And so we don’t consider or study the means of peace, or make them available to our leaders. We speak well of peace, we say we want it, we have paid the lives of innumerable other people and unaccountable wealth supposedly to get it, but we seem not to mind, we seem not to notice, that all we have got for so much loss, for so long, is more war.

http://www.theamericanconservative.com/articles/wendell-berry-burkean/ - http://www.theamericanconservative.com/articles/wendell-berry-burkean/

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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 26 March 2015 at 5:42pm
Wealth vs. Money

"There is no patent. Could you patent the sun?"


The words are those of Jonas Salk, developer of the polio vaccine, speaking to Edward R. Murrow in 1955, as quoted recently in an essay by Paul Buchheit. What was he thinking? Six decades later, the words have such a counter-resonance with prevailing thought. They exude an old-fashioned humility and innocence, like . . . striking it rich isn't necessarily the ultimate point of life?

I read these words and sense so much spilled wisdom in them, so much wasted hope. The world we've created is governed these days by two unquestioned principles: commodify and dominate. And it's chewing up the resources that used to belong to every occupant of the planet.

"Eighty people hold the same amount of wealth as the world's 3.6 billion poorest people, according to an analysis just released from Oxfam," Mona Chalabi wrote in January at FiveThirtyEight.com. "The report from the global anti-poverty organization finds that since 2009, the wealth of those 80 richest has doubled in nominal terms - while the wealth of the poorest 50 percent of the world's population has fallen."

The winners keep winning and everyone loses.

Thus there is an "urgent need to tackle the vested interests of the 1 percent," writes Winnie Byanyima, executive director of Oxfam International. Wealth is a wedge to maintain wealth and widen the gap between those who have and those who don't. Wealth seeks to privatize the world and shut most people out.

"Wealth is used to entrench inequality, not to trickle down and solve it. . . ." she writes. "Across the world, we see that great money doesn't only buy a nice car or a better education or healthcare. It can buy power: impunity from justice; an election; a pliant media; favourable laws. With the privatisation of our universities it can even buy the world of ideas."

It's the opposite of the philosophy implicit in Salk's comment: that what we do as individuals we do for the good of the whole, and, indeed, there is no separation between the individual and the whole. As Lewis Mumford once wrote, as quoted by Charles Eisenstein in his book Sacred Economics: "A patent is a device that enables one man to claim special financial rewards for being the last link in the complicated social process that produced the invention."

The point I'm reaching for is not about being nice or charitable but about how we need to notch up our sense of what it means to be realistic. We are not alone in this world. We are intricately and complexly connected to it, and we need a system of being - political, social, cultural and economic - fully and enthusiastically cognizant of this fact. We need to reorganize humanity around this awareness, especially economically, because the current system blinds us to this crucial reality.


"I believe we can build a human economy where people are the bottom line," Byanyima writes, to which I would add: not just people but the whole planet. And it begins with a change in awareness: that wealth and money are not interchangeable concepts and, indeed, that wealth can be experienced but not, in fact, "held." And the 80 billionaires who control the same amount of capital as the world's 3.6 billion most impoverished residents may have corralled an astonishing amount of power over others but have wealth equal only to their level of spiritual awareness, which is an awareness that begins, perhaps, with a surrender of the self to the larger context in which we are alive.

You might call this context evolution. When we live our lives to the fullest, we contribute to the greater whole and this is the basis of spiritual fulfillment. It can't be hoarded; it can't be gamed; it's not a zero-sum process, in which more spiritual fulfillment for me means less for you.

"What was once sacred to us . . . is becoming no longer sacred," Eisenstein said in an interview with Jonathan Talat Phillips. "For example, just a couple generations ago, we revered growth: the expansion of the human realm, the conquest of nature, etc. Today our values are changing, and we want to protect and heal nature. But money is still rooted in the old values. So, what I mean by 'sacred economics' is the realigning of money with those things that are becoming sacred to us today, those things that we deeply value."

So this is our dilemma: Money is still rooted in the old values. Civilization had a 6,000-year growth spurt propelled by domination and conquest of the planet and one another. We're at the end of this spurt; we're running out of what we can conquer, but we're still enthralled to an economic system that insists that the conquests continue. We have to keep exploiting and privatizing the planet - "the commons," as Eisenstein calls it - chopping it up and selling it back to one another. This is an economic system that insists on proclaiming winners (very few) and losers (the many). It's an economic system that will sacrifice the public good when it's time to do so, and that time has come.


~Robert Koehler

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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 02 April 2015 at 5:55pm
Shaykh Hamza Yusuf: Healing Self, Healing Society - 2014 Festival of Faiths

Introduction begins at 6 Min 30 Seconds into this video.
Program begins at 15 Min 40 seconds into this video.

Shaykh Hamza Yusuf speaks at the 2014 Festival of Faiths: Sacred Earth Sacred Self in Louisville, Kentucky held at Actors Theatre of Louisville by the Center for Interfaith Relations.

Shaykh Hamza Yusuf is joined by Rabbi Joe Rooks Rapport for the second half of the session which features an audience Q&A.



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=asq_8S9qGvQ - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=asq_8S9qGvQ

(About 2 hours)

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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 28 December 2018 at 2:05pm

A Green Tree in Your Heart

"Keep a green tree in your heart and perhaps a singing bird will come."

Building community is a sacred process, so I begin here, with a Chinese proverb that a healer and social worker turned into a song. The sacred has an intensely personal dimension to it, and the singing bird rips it open for me. 

Three weeks ago I wrote a column called "The Barbara Tree," in which I talked about two things: the orange papier-mch bird that mysteriously appeared on a branch of the linden tree that had been planted in a nearby park in honor of my late wife; and a blog-in-progress I'm in the process of launching, with some friends, called Chicago Spirit, which seeks to celebrate the world-in-progress that so many people are creating: the world beyond war, Eco-exploitation, domination consciousness, spectator culture and the privatization of the commons.

I invited response, i.e., participation, having no idea what it would look like. This is not a simple world, as cynics would dismiss it. It's a world of risky reaching out, groping for connection. What I got was music, art, story. What I got was politics, courage and craftsmanship, sometimes wrapped around anger, more often wrapped around love. And birds and trees kept showing up in fascinating and heart-wrenching ways.


"I too lost my wife to a long term disease and I think of her often," wrote Michael Boyter. "Paula also loved birds and our back yard was transformed by her love and care into a national bird sanctuary."

And so begins community, at the level of loss and truth. "I have a college degree in Environmental Studies and Solar Energy Design," he went on. "I understand what we need to do to save our planet, our environment and our civilization. Has it gone too far down to be saved?\

"Repowering hope," he said, "that is something that needs to be done for the people of the USA and the world."

http://https://www.islamicity.org/7894/a-green-tree-in-your-heart/ - http://https://www.islamicity.org/7894/a-green-tree-in-your-heart/




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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 04 January 2019 at 1:49pm

Rudy Francisco - "When the Water Is Gone"


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vtJ9_mDYgNE - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vtJ9_mDYgNE

(2 mins)


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 05 January 2019 at 2:17pm

Save the World | National Geographic's Short Film Showcase


As the human population continues to grow, so does our impact on the environment. In fact, recent research has shown that three-quarters of Earth’s land surface is under pressure from human activity. In this short film, spoken word artist Prince Ea makes a powerful case for protecting the planet and challenges the human race to create a sustainable future.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B-nEYsyRlYo - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B-nEYsyRlYo

(About 4 mins)


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 08 January 2019 at 2:13pm

Look & See -- Exclusive Trailer-Wendell Berry



Produced by Robert Redford, Terrence Malick, and Nick Offerman and directed by Laura Dunn (The Unforeseen), the documentary is a beautiful and poignant portrait of the changing landscapes and shifting values of rural America in the era of industrial agriculture, as seen through the eye of American novelist, poet, and activist, Wendell Berry.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G2iPPpEFn7U - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G2iPPpEFn7U


(About 3 mins)


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 09 January 2019 at 1:54pm

Living indoors is slowly killing us


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Le-uRcqEaxA - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Le-uRcqEaxA


(About 3 mins)


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 14 January 2019 at 4:15pm

Beautiful Places: A Conversation with Wendell Berry


Listen to a conversation between two giants of the local economy movement in this extended episode. Helena Norberg-Hodge founded Local Futures, produced the film The Economics of Happiness, and wrote the book Ancient Futures: Learning from Ladakh. Wendell Berry is a poet and activist, an author of over 40 books, and a lifelong advocate for ecological health, the beauty of rural life, and small-scale farming. Their far-reaching discussion touches on human nature, technology, experiential knowledge, agriculture policy, happiness, wildness, and local food systems.

https://www.localfutures.org/local-bite/beautiful-places-a-conversation-with-wendell-berry/ - https://www.localfutures.org/local-bite/beautiful-places-a-conversation-with-wendell-berry/

(54 mins)


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 23 January 2019 at 1:32pm

How 12,000 Tonnes of Dumped Orange Peel Grew Into a Landscape Nobody Expected to Find

PETER DOCKRILL
30 AUG 2017

An experimental conservation project that was abandoned and almost forgotten about, has ended up producing an amazing ecological win nearly two decades after it was dreamt up.

The plan, which saw a juice company dump 1,000 truckloads of waste orange peel in a barren pasture in Costa Rica back in the mid 1990s, has eventually revitalised the desolate site into a thriving, lush forest.

That's one heck of a turnaround, especially since the project was forced to close in only its second year – but despite the early cancellation, the peel already deposited on the 3-hectare (7-acre) site led to a 176 percent increase in above-ground biomass.

"This is one of the only instances I've ever heard of where you can have cost-negative carbon sequestration," https://www.princeton.edu/news/2017/08/22/orange-new-green-how-orange-peels-revived-costa-rican-forest - says ecologist Timothy Treuer from Princeton University.

"It's not just a win-win between the company and the local park – it's a win for everyone."


https://www.sciencealert.com/how-12-000-tonnes-of-dumped-orange-peel-produced-something-nobody-imagined - https://www.sciencealert.com/how-12-000-tonnes-of-dumped-orange-peel-produced-something-nobody-imagined



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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 27 January 2019 at 3:48pm

Planet Warriors

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YHVycGEs3r0 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YHVycGEs3r0


(About 4 mins)


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 28 January 2019 at 2:22pm

David Attenborough: Environmentalism is a duty, not an interest


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NabcyTqJRXk - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NabcyTqJRXk

(About 5 mins)

David Attenborough at the WEF in Davos 2019 "'the Garden of Eden is no more"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QMGHEf9XuNg - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QMGHEf9XuNg


(About 6 mins)


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 30 January 2019 at 2:30pm

Thriving 23-Year-Old Permaculture Food Forest - An Invitation for Wildness

In the small town of Riverton at the bottom of New Zealand’s South Island is Robert and Robyn Guyton’s amazing 23-year-old food forest. The 2-acre property has been transformed from a neglected piece of land into a thriving ecosystem of native and exotic trees where birds and insects live in abundance. Robert and Robyn are a huge inspiration to us, not only for their beautiful approach to healing the land and saving heritage trees and seeds, but for the way they’ve impacted on their local community. They’ve operated an environment center in their town for over 20 years, where the community comes together to learn and discuss, buy produce and sit by the warm fire over a cuppa. We’ve even heard of folk who’ve up and moved to Riverton because they’re so inspired by the Guytons!


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6GJFL0MD9fc - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6GJFL0MD9fc


(About 20 mins)


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 03 February 2019 at 4:03pm

Our Future | Narrated by Morgan Freeman


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8YQIaOldDU8 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8YQIaOldDU8


(About 4 mins)


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 04 February 2019 at 3:31pm

Wendell Berry on Climate Change: To Save the Future, Live in the Present

In this selection from his new book, the poet and farmer Wendell Berry connects the dangers of the future to a failure to live fully in the here and now.


There is in fact much at hand and in reach that is good, useful, encouraging, and full of promise, although we seem less and less inclined to attend to or value what is at hand. We are always ready to set aside our present life, even our present happiness, to peruse the menu of future exterminations. If the future is threatened by the present, which it undoubtedly is, then the present is more threatened, and often is annihilated, by the future.“Oh, oh, oh,” cry the funerary experts, looking ahead through their black veils. “Life as we know it soon will end. If the governments don’t stop us, we’re going to destroy the world. The time is coming when we will have to do something to save the world. The time is coming when it will be too late to save the world. Oh, oh, oh.” If that is the way our minds are afflicted, we and our world are dead already. The present is going by and we are not in it. Maybe when the present is past, we will enjoy sitting in dark rooms and looking at pictures of it, even as the present keeps arriving in our absence.

Or maybe we could give up saving the world and start to live savingly in it. If using less energy would be a good idea for the future, that is because it is a good idea. The government could enforce such a saving by rationing fuels, citing the many good reasons, as it did during World War II. If the government should do something so sensible, I would respect it much more than I do. But to wish for good sense from the government only displaces good sense into the future, where it is of no use to anybody and is soon overcome by prophesies of doom. On the contrary, so few as just one of us can save energy right now by self-control, careful thought, and remembering the lost virtue of frugality. Spending less, burning less, traveling less may be a relief. A cooler, slower life may make us happier, more present to ourselves, and to others who need us to be present. Because of such rewards, a large problem may be effectively addressed by the many small solutions that, after all, are necessary, no matter what the government might do. The government might even do the right thing at last by imitating the people.

Only the present good is good. It is the presence of good—good work, good thoughts, good acts, good places—by which we know that the present does not have to be a nightmare of the future.

https://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/together-with-earth/wendell-berry-climate-change-future-present - https://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/together-with-earth/wendell-berry-climate-change-future-present






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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 07 February 2019 at 2:44pm

Minimalism: A Documentary About the Important Things (Official Trailer)

How might your life be better with less? MINIMALISM: A DOCUMENTARY ABOUT THE IMPORTANT THINGS examines the many flavors of minimalism by taking the audience inside the lives of minimalists from all walks of life—families, entrepreneurs, architects, artists, journalists, scientists, and even a former Wall Street broker—all of whom are striving to live a meaningful life with less.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Co1Iptd4p4 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Co1Iptd4p4

(3 mins)


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 09 February 2019 at 6:21am

Dutch ocean crusader Boyan Slat awarded top global environmental prize for Inspiration and Action


Boyan Slat becomes the youngest winner of the United Nation’s Champions of the Earth Award for inspiring efforts to cleanup the oceans.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4IqsD-HAYwk - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4IqsD-HAYwk

(About 3 mins)


How the oceans can clean themselves: Boyan Slat at TEDxDelft

18-year-old Boyan Slat combines environmentalism, entrepreneurism and technology to tackle global issues of sustainability. After diving in Greece, and coming across more plastic bags than fish, he wondered; "why can't we clean this up?" While still being on secondary school, he then decided to dedicate half a year of research to understand plastic pollution and the problems associated with cleaning it up. This ultimately led to his passive clean-up concept, which he presented at TEDxDelft 2012. Working to prove the feasibility of his concept, Boyan Slat currently gives lead to a team of approximately 50 people, and temporarily quit his Aerospace Engineering study to completely focus his efforts on The Ocean Cleanup.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ROW9F-c0kIQ - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ROW9F-c0kIQ

(About 12 mins)


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 20 February 2019 at 4:29pm

Healing Self, Healing Society - Shaykh Hamza Yusuf

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d0SYEYKm6ec - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d0SYEYKm6ec

(106 mins)

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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 26 February 2019 at 2:40pm

The fog catcher who brings water to the poor

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1_BJi4BkIAs - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1_BJi4BkIAs

(2 mins)


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 10 March 2019 at 12:31am

Kathleen Dean Moore on climate change, moral integrity, and hope

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qb4pJrJsCYo - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qb4pJrJsCYo

(11 mins)


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 15 April 2019 at 5:42pm

Zygmunt Bauman: Behind the world's 'crisis of humanity' l Talk to Al Jazeera


One of the most prominent philosophers of our time is Zygmunt Bauman. Born in Poland 90 years ago, he has thought and written extensively about the modern era, and what it is doing to us, coining the phrase, "liquid fear" - a tangible feeling of anxiety that has only vague contours but is still acutely present everywhere. We sit down with Zygmunt Bauman on Talk to Al Jazeera and take a step back to discuss what is happening in the world.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EG63MkQb1r4 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EG63MkQb1r4

(26 mins)


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 25 April 2019 at 3:23am

Save Water Doing Eco Wudhu - Project https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23GreenUmmah - #GreenUmmah

What is Project https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23GreenUmmah - #GreenUmmah ? Project https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23GreenUmmah - #GreenUmmah is a go-green campaign with the objective of promoting green practices to reduce the use of water and also cut down on waste by starting to take a more active role in caring for the environment and in following the sunnah of Rasullah SAW. Ever wondered how you can do your part to save our dying planet? Do you feel as if your contributions are insignificant to this big blue globe? We're here to tell you, every little effort counts. Rallying Muslims all over the world to a single proactive unified cause to save the environment... We bring you: Project https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23GreenUmmah - #GreenUmmah . Rasullullah SAW practiced life in moderation. Never one to waste, he is the exemplary human being we should all aim to emulate. In Project https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23GreenUmmah - #GreenUmmah , we aim to further emphasise the need to save water and reduce waste - something which has already been reiterated before by many other organisations. This will serve as a reminder to all that caring for the environment, is a continuous cause and not a one-off solution. One where we can empower and educate our future generation to carry on and lead the change toward better lifelong habits. This Eco Wudhu video - brilliantly directed by the prolific and illustrous Mr Sanif Olek, is the first step to many more efforts we aim to launch - in the hope to promote greater awareness towards caring for our environment. In this video, we demonstrate how one can save up to 10litres of water per wudhu, simply by switching the tap to a smaller stream. We are sure many of you out there have already been practicing this good habit - but it is always useful to have such a platform to keep the efforts going.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7_m4VCY5HUk - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7_m4VCY5HUk

(4 mins)



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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 16 May 2019 at 3:35pm

On Permaculture: Dr. Umar Faruq Abd-Allah

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vkaAA6Qxvrs - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vkaAA6Qxvrs

(14 mins)


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 17 May 2019 at 3:05pm

Wendell Berry Farming Program

Wendell Berry, the 81-year-old award-winning poet, fiction writer and essayist, has continued throughout his life to care for the Kentucky farm that generations of his family have tended. Seeking to pass on their farming legacy to a new generation, Berry and his family have formed an alliance with Saint Catharine College, a small Catholic liberal arts school run by the Dominican Sisters of Peace. Correspondent Judy Valente talks with Mary Berry, Wendell Berry’s daughter, and with nuns, students, and faculty members at the college about the lessons and values that spring from having a spiritual kinship with the land.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vGG5BED6dZI - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vGG5BED6dZI

(About 9 mins)


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 18 May 2019 at 7:47pm

Why humans are so bad at thinking about climate change

The biggest problem for the climate change fight isn’t technology – it’s human psychology.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DkZ7BJQupVA - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DkZ7BJQupVA

(10 mins)


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 19 May 2019 at 8:15pm

Nature Deficit Disorder

Global Voices for Justice interviews Richard Louv, author of The Nature Principle, Last Child in the Woods, The Web of Life, and other books. Louv shares a hopeful message for every area of life from more productive workplaces, to better classroom learning and healing our nature-starved spirits.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1e6_cY3-J3o - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1e6_cY3-J3o

(12 mins)


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah


Posted By: a well wisher
Date Posted: 20 May 2019 at 3:44pm

Why 30 Minutes of Nature a Day Is So Good for Your Health

Science is showing how immersion in nature speeds healing and acts as an antidote for many ailments.


Some of the most interesting research on the connection between health and nature is coming from Japan. Walking and spending time in forests, known as shinrin-yoku, or forest bathing, is a popular form of preventive health care in Japan. Studies are now proving the health benefits of spending time in forests. Yoshifumi Miyazaki from Chiba University, Japan, discovered that going for a 40-minute walk in a cedar forest lowers the level of cortisol, a stress hormone, as well as blood pressure and supports the immune system more than a similar 40-minute walk indoors in a lab. Qing Li from Nippon Medical School in Tokyo has shown that trees and plants emit compounds known as phytoncides that when inhaled give us therapeutic benefits akin to aromatherapy. Phytoncides also change the blood composition, which impacts our protection against cancer, boosts our immune system and lowers our blood pressure.

https://www.yesmagazine.org/happiness/health-nature-science-outside-20190410 - https://www.yesmagazine.org/happiness/health-nature-science-outside-20190410


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La ilaha ill-Allah, Muhammadur Rasulullah



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